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stone, commemorates William Gurle, cur wardo*
rum et libaconum. He died April 16th 1617,
cet. 78.

A mural monument of Sir John Brocket, of
Brocket Hall, in this parish, who died in 1598. By
the death of Sir James Brocket, this antient and
respectable family became extinct in the male line.

Here is a large monument with two ladies one
over the other, lying on their sides. One is dame
Elizabeth, wife of the aforesaid Sir John Brocket ;
she was widow to Gabriel Fowler, esquire, and
daughter of Roger Moore, esquire, by Agnes
Hussey, relict of three husbands, Moore, Curson,
and chief baron Saunders" 1 . The other figure is of
this Agnes, who died in 1588. This memorial was
erected by Richard Fowler, son to Lady Brocket,
by her first husband. .

An extraordinary person, see Granger III. 367 octavo.



GOBIONS. 559

A monument of Sir James Read, baronet, of
Brocket Hall, which descended to him by the
marriage of his grandfather Thomas Read, esquire,
with Maty, fifth daughter of Sir Thomas Brocket.
This is mural, with a bust of him and his wife, who
left daughters, coheirs.

From hence I continued my journey along the Gobions.
great road. Passed by Gobions, in the parish of
North Mims, which took its name from the old
family of the Gobions, its antient lords, as early as
the time of King Stephen*. The Mores afterwards
possessed it for some generations. Sir John, the
father of the celebrated Sir Thomas More, owned
it in the reign of Henry VII. and it became the
residence of that illustrious character till the time
of his cruel sacrifice; when the son was stripped
of every part of his fortune by the most arbitrary
attainders. It reverted again to the family, but
the grandson of Sir Thomas, being ruined by the
civil, wars, sold it to Sir Edzvard Desborevy. It
afterwards came by sale to Mr. Pitchford, and to Sir
Jeremiah Sambroke. From his sisters it devolved
to Mr. Freeman, of Hammels, and was afterwards
sold to the present owner, Mr. Hunter.

Not far from a place called Potters-bar, (proba-
bly from some pottery, such as is still carried on

* Salmon's Herts, 46v i



560 ENFIELD PALACE.

at Woodside, about two miles to the north, on the
same road) I entered the county of

MIDDLESEX :

kept along the edge of E?ijield Chace' 1 to Hadley ;
passed through Cheping Barnet, and, in less than
a mile beyond, quitted the great road at Pricklers
Hill; again skirted the Chace, descended Winch-
more Hill, and concluded the day's journey at En-
fold, the object of this little digression.
New River. The New River, the work of my illustrious
countryman Sir Hugh Middleton * (which on the
north edge of this parish, for some yards, as till
lately at Islington, is conveyed in a trough of wood
lined with lead, called The Boarded River, over a
brick arch fifteen feet high) was the first object of
my attention.

I next visited the antient brick house called
Enfield Palace, built by Sir Thomas Lovel, knight

of the Garter, and privy counsellor to Henry VII;



y This chace was inclosed by act of parliament in 1779 ; and
of the 8000 acres whereof it consisted, 2584 were appropriated
to the use of the Crown, and the residue divided between the
four adjoining parishes of Enfield, Edmonton, Hadley, and
South Mints.

e See some account of it in my Welsh Tour, vol. ii. p. 29.
ed. 1810. vol. ii.p. 152.



ENFIELD PALACE. 56l

where he died in 1524\ It is conjectured that
Henry VIII. bought it for a nursery for his chil-
dren b . Here Edward VI. received the first news
of his father's death, and his own accession. On
the chimney-piece of the great parlour are the arms
of England in a Garter, supported by a Lion and a
Griffin ; on the sides, the Rose and Portcullis
crowned ; with E. R. beneath. These initials are
also on the stucco in front of the house.

Queen Elizabeth used sometimes to make this
place a visit. Robert Cary Earl of Monmouth
informs us he once waited on her Highness at En-
field, where she went to take a dinner, and had
toiles set up in the park, to shoot at bucks, after
she had dined .

In the time of the great plague, in 1665, a very
flourishing school was kept here by Mr. Uvedale.
That gentleman was very fond of gardening, and,
among other trees, planted a cedar of Libanus; Great
which is still in being. The storm of 1 703 broke
off eight feet from the top. The dimensions of it
at present are :



Camden, i. 398.

b See the Antiquarian Repertory, ii. 23 1 j where a print of
this palace is given. It is now divided into several dwellings.

* His Memoirs, 2d edit. p. 136. .

2 o



Cedar.



36<2 WALTHAM CROSS.



Height 45 feet 9 inches.


Girth at top 3


7


Second girth 7


9


Third 10





Fourth 14


6 d



Worcester Not far from hence, on the north side of Four-

House.

tree-hill, stood Worcester House, built by the ac-
complished John Tibetot, or Tiptoft, Earl of Wor-
cester" f who was beheaded in 1470. The manor,
which still retains his title, descended to him from
his father, Sir John Tiptoft. The house was re-
built on higher ground, by Sir Nicholas Raynton,
knight, lord mayor of London in 1640, who died
in 1647, and has a splendid monument in Enfield
church. The place is now owned by Eliab Breton,
Esquire, who married a co-heiress of the Raynton
and JVolstenholme families.

I made a visit from hence to TValtham Abbey,
seated in Essex, about three miles from Enfield,
Waltham on the west side of the river Lea. I past by Wal-
tham Cross, one of the affectionate memorials of
Edward I. towards his beloved queen Eleanor.
The cross is in excellent preservation, and richly

d See the ingenious account of cedars planted in England,
by my respected friend the Reverend Sir John Culhan, bart.
Gent. Mag. 1779, p. 138.

c Norden's Middlesex, 19.



WALTHAM CHURCH. 5G3

adorned with gothic sculpture. This tract is a rich
flat of verdant meadows, watered by the Lea, and
bounded on each side by gentle risings. The
meads belonging to the abbey are distinguished by
the name of Halifield, or The holy field.

The present church oiWaltham is only the nave Church.
of the antient structure,which was in the form of a
cross, with a central tower ; the latter fell down after
the dissolution, and the new tower was built at one
end in 1555. Within are six massy pillars ; some
carved with spiral, others with zigzag furrows, like
those of the nave of Durham cathedral. The
arches are round ; above them are two rows of gal-
leries, in what is called the Saxon stile. At the
east end remains one vast ronnd arch of the tower.

The only monuments of any note, are those of
the Dennies. That of Sir Edzvard Denny, and
Joan his wife, has on it their figures, in a reclined
posture; he in armour; in front are the figures
of six of their sons and four of their daughters
kneeling. Sir Edward was of the privy chamber
to Queen Elizabeth ; governor of Kerry and Des-
monde, and colonel of some Irish forces. He died
in 1599, aged about fifty -two, and, I hope, merited
this eulogy inscribed on the tomb :

Learn, curious reader, how you pass;
Your once Sir Edward Damy was

2 o 2



564 WALTHAM ABBEY.

A courtier of the chamber,

A soldier of the field ;
Whose tongue could never flatter;

Whose heart could never yealde.

The tombs of Earl Harold, founder of the
abbey; of the famous Hugo Nevill, who slew a
lion in the Holy Land, and of several others, are
now lost, having perished with the fall of the tower
on the eastern part of the church, in which they
were placed f .
Abbey. The abbey stood near the church. Its only
remains are a gate and postern, with the arms of
England in the time of Henry III ; part of a clois-
ter, and an elliptic bridge over the moat. The
edifice was pulled down after the dissolution, and
the materials applied to building a mansion by Sir
Anthony Denny (father of Sir Edward) to whom
the place had been granted by Edward VI. His
lady afterwards purchased the reversion in fee of
JValtham manor, from the same prince, for be-
tween three and four thousand pounds, with seve-
ral large privileges in the adjoining forest 5 . This,
and the great estate of the family, passed after-
wards to the luxurious Hay Earl of Carlisle, by
his marriage with the heiress of Edward Denny
Earl of Norwich, grandson of Sir Anthony. The
f Weevcr, 644. Fuller's Hist. JValtham Abbey, 13.



WALTHAM ABBEY. 565

fortune was soon dissipated ; and the estate sold by
their heirs to Sir Samuel Jones of Northampton-
shire, who gave it to the Wakes ; it is at present
owned by Sir William Wake, baronet.

The abbey was founded in 1062, by Earl
Harold, afterwards king of England. It might
more properly be stiled a college, having a dean
and eleven secular black canons, who were excel-
lently provided for; six manors being appropriated
to the dean, and one to each canon. A copy of
the charter of confirmation by Edward the Con-
fessor is preserved by Sir William Dugdale* 1 .

After the battle of Hastings, Githa, the mo-
ther of Harold, and Osegod, and Ailric, by their
prayers and tears moved the Conqueror to deliver
to them the corpse of the Sa,von monarch, and of
his brethren Girth and Leofwin, to be interred
here. Harold's tomb was of rich grey marble,
with a cross fleury on it, and supported by four
pedestals K

Henry II. in 1 177, changed the foundation into
an abbot and regulars, of the order of St. Austin k .
The first abbot was Walter de Gaunt, who ob-
tained the privileges of the mitre, and of being
exempt from episcopal jurisdiction 1 .

Robert Fuller was the last abbot, who, with

h Monast. ii. 11. i Fuller's Waltham, 7.

* Tanner, 119. ' Willis, i. 191.



5GG COPTHALL.

seventeen of his religious, resigned the monastery
to the king, March 23d, 1540. Their whole num-
ber was twenty-four. Their revenue, according
to Dugdale, was . 900. 4*. 3d. ; to Speed,
. 1079. 12*. Id.

The largest tulip-tree, I believe, in England,
stands within the abbey precinct ; being fourteen
feet in circumference near the bottom.
Copthaix. From hence, at a distance, on a rising ground,
I saw Copt hall, once a villa and park belonging to
the abbots. Richard I. bestowed the lands on
Richard Fit z- Anchor, to hold them in fee, and
hereditarily of the abbey. He fixed himself at
this seat. At length the abbot became possessed
of it, and retained it till the dissolution. Queen
Elizabeth granted it to Sir Thomas Heneage. His
daughter, afterwards Countess of JVinchelsea, sold
it to the Earl of Middlesex, in the reign of James
I. Charles Earl of Dorset sold it, in 1700, to
Thomas TVcbster, Esquire, created Baronet in
1703 : and he sold it to Edward Cony ers, Esquire,
of Walthamstmv, whose grandson, John, is the
present possessor m .

m The late Mr. Conyers took down the old house (of which
a print may be seen in Farmer s History of Waltham Abbey)
and built the present on a higher site, about thirty years ago.
The beautiful east window in St. Margaret's church at West-
minster, came originally from the chapel of this old mansion.



THEOBALDS. 567

Returning the same way over the Lea, I
could not but reflect on the different appearance
this tract now makes, to what it did in the days of
King Alfred, when it was navigable for ships to e^"*/^ s tN
the Thames, and by which the piratical Danish 8 9 6 -
navy came up quite to Hertford. Our great
monarch instantly set about frittering this vast
water into various small streams; and, to the amaze-
ment of the free-booters, left their fleet on dry
land". At present a useful canal passes along the
country.

Close to Cheshunt stood the magnificent palace Theobalds.
of Theobalds, built by lord treasurer Burleigh.
When James I. came from Scotland to take pos-
session of the English throne, on May 3d, 1603,
he was received here by the lords of the privy
council, and was most sumptuously entertained by
the owner, Sir Robert Cecil, afterwards Earl of
Salisbury. James fell in love with the place, ob-
tained it from Cecil in exchange for Hatfield, en-
larged the park, and inclosed it with a brick
wall ten miles in circuit : it was resigned to the
king and queen, on the 22d of May 1607. A
poetical entertainment was made on the occasion,
by Ben Jonson, and suitable scenery invented, in
all probability by Inigo Jones . The Genius of

n Saxon Chr. 96. Chr. J. Bromton, SI 3.
Tour in Wales, ii. 142.



568 THEOBALDS.

the place is at first very anxious about her lot; at
last is reconciled to it by Mercury and the Fates,
and the piece concludes with a most flattering
chorus p . James was particularly fond of this
palace, and finished his days here in 1625. In
1651 , the greatest part of this magnificent place
(so particularly described by Hentzner) was
pulled down, and the plunder given to the soldiers.
The small remains (such as the room in which the
king died, and a portico with the painting of the
genealogical tree of the house of Cecil) were de-
molished in 1765, by the present owner, George
Prescot, Esquire, who leased out the site to a
builder, and erected a handsome house for him-
self a mile south of it ; so that its memory is only
preserved by the picture in the possession of Earl
Poulet, at Hinton St. George ; and the descrip-
tion, from Lord Burleigh's own hand-writing, pre-
served in Murderis State Papers q .

I returned by Enfield, pursued the direct
road to London, passed by Tottenham High Cross
(so called from a wooden cross formerly placed on
a little mount) and in a short time joined my friends
in the great metropolis.

P Ben Jonson's Works, v. 226.

' Mr. Gough's Br. Topogr. i. 426.



APPENDIX.



APPENDIX. I.



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APPENDIX. IT.



N II.



CATALOGUE OF THE PICTURES AT BLITHEFIELD. P. ne.



DRAWING ROOM.




The Rape of Europa -


Albano


A Landscape ; St. John baptising Christ




in the Wilderness


Zuccarelli


St. Jerome presenting his Works to the




Infant Jesus


Corregio


Rachel at the Well


C. Lotti


A Landscape the Flight into Egypt


Zuccarelli


A Bird Piece


Hondekccter


A Boy's Head


Fr. Bartolomeo-


The Annunciation of the Virgin


Domenichino


A small oval Landscape ; a Storm


G. Poussin


Portrait of a Singer


Murillo


Nativity of St. John


Al. Veronese


Virgin and Child


Raphael, in his




'irst manner


Players at Minciati ; Portraits


Alb. Durer


Oval Landscape ; Rocks, &c.


G. Poussin


Oval Portrait


Vandyck


Burning the Vatican (from the Car-




toons)


Raphael


A Magdalen


Guido


Boors drawing Wine from a Vat




A Concert -


Palamedesj


A Landscape, with Ruin


N. Poussin



APPENDIX. II.



57S



A Supper, with Singers
Virgin, and dead Christ
Head of St. John

Three Manfs, with the Body of Christ

(a copy from)
Moliere(p. 115.)
Stoning St. Stephen
Boors drinking

Altar-piece, with Virgin and Child
Fruit and dead Game -

Landscape, with a Mill Pool
An oval Head - m

A Pass of the Alps



Palamedes
Dan. de Volterra
Guercino

An. Caracci
Spanish School
Filippo Laura

Benv. Garofolo
Fyt

Van Goyen

Tintoret

Colomba



VESTIBULE.



Ruins of Roman Buildings - P. Panini

The Duke of Buckingham a - Giorgione

A Landscape - P. Brille

Angel appearing to the Shepherds And. Sacchi

A Landscape P. Brille

Jacob's Journey - - Castiglione

A Popish Idea ef the Trinity b - Alb. Durer
Virtue triumphing over Vice. A Sbozzo
of the great picture in the Council



a Engraved as such, under the title of Humphrey Stafford,
or Bagot, in the History of the Royal Tribes of Wales, by
Philip Yorke, Esq. but evidently the portrait of an Italian
nobleman, of a much later period. Ed.

b Christ in the lap of the Deity, who wears the Tiara ; a
Dove above. Painted on a gold ground. Ed.



574 APPENDIX. II.

Chamber of the Palace of St. Mark at
Venice - - Paolo Veronese

l/)t and his Daughters. (Engraved by

Strange) - . Guercino, in his

light manner
The Continence of Scipio - Seb. Conca

Judgment of Solomon - S. Vouet

The Feast of Levi (a Sketch) - P. Veronese

Inside of a Kitchen - Giac. Bassan

Women preparing Pot-herbs - Ostade

Landscape and Figures - Holbein

A Sketch - C. Cignani

Two Neapolitan Officers - Valentino

Boors at Cards - Teniers

Head ; a Study C. Maratti

A Poor Family Le Nain

Portrait of a young Italian Lady Rosalba

Petrarch's Triumph of Time. This pic-
ture contains Portraits. The figure
in scarlet, holding a bubble, is Pe-
trarch himself. The man in black, by
him, is Giovanni Villani, the Floren-
tine historian. The figure in green,
on the black horse, is the emperor.
The two, on white horses following
the car, are Roger King of Sicily, and
the Constable Cohnna, Petrarch's
friends and favourites. The figure on
foot, in black, with a long beard, pre-
ceded by two boys, in short students'
cloaks, is Bmnetti Latini - Old Franks



APPENDIX. II.



575



St. Peter's at Rome.
Cupids at Play
Virgin and Infant
Landscape, with Goats, &c.
the figures by



G. Occhiati
Rottenhammer
Italian School
P. Brille
An. Caracci



BREAKFAST ROOM.

Waltei* Chetwynde of Ingestrie - Sir P. Lely
A Battle Piece - - Bourgognone

Portrait of a Piper - - Fr. Hals

Virgin Mary - - C. Maratti

Christ bearing the Cross - Van Eyck

The Nativity - - Van Eyck

The Scourging of Christ - Van Eyck

A Flemish Officer and Woman on horse-
back - Blekers
An Italian Poet, or Improvisario, with

a Guitar ; supposed to be Ariosto Lanfranco
A Landscape from Both - De Heusch

Portrait of a Friar in the Character of

Diogenes - - Lanfranco

A Man driving Cattle - Castiglione

An old Man reading - Mrs. Anson

Landscape - - Van Goyen

Devereux Earl of Essex. (P. 113.)
Sir Walter Aston. (P. 112.)
Villiers Duke of Buckingham.
Henry Earl of Huntingdon. (P. 112.)
Lewis Bagot.

Portrait unknown. Date 1622, at. 40.
Lord Burleigh, (P. 111.)



576 APPENDIX. II.

STAIRCASE.

Hugo Grotius - - School of Rembrandt

Landscape ; Cattle and Figures Paiel.

A Fish Market - - Batt. Bassan

LIBRARY.

St. Paul shaking off the Viper Guercino, in his dark

manner.



N III.

EXPENCES IN THE REPAIRS OF LICHFIELD CATHEDRAL,
AFTER THE RESTORATION. P. 143.



[From. Mr. Greene of Lichfield's MSS.]



. s. d.



By the accounts of the late Bishop Hacket,
Mr. Glazier, and Mr. Harrison, the sum
of money received by them, for the re-
pairs of the cathedral church of Lichfield,
amounts to - 9092 1 7|

Besides two fair timber trees, which his
majesty gave out of Need-wood, inserted
but not valued, in the book of the said
accounts - - - 0$

As also, there is omitted out of the said ac-
counts, glazing seven of the south win-
dows, by Mr. Creswell; wherein his arms,
which (saith he) cost about - 30

Out of which . 9092 1*. 7fd. the late
Bishop Hacket gave out of his own purse,
to the repairs of the said cathedral 1683 12



PICTURES AT GORHAMBURY.

<. s. d.
Bishop Wood, when dean, gave - 50

And since bishop - - 10

And promised (saith Dean Smalhvood) more 100

In St. Peter's chapel (which is now a place to lay lad-
ders and scaffolding) was painted upon the wall St. Peter
crucified with his head downwards ; and two other apostles.
And in this place is the noted St. Chad's tomb (though de-
faced) removed from the Lady Choir, to be put here,
since the Restoration.



577



N IV.

ADDITIONAL LIST OF

PICTURES AT GORHAMBURY. Page 337.



DRAWING ROOM.




A Sea Piece -


S. Ruysdael


Landscape -


Zucarelli


Landscape and Figures


Mola


Theseus and his Mother


S. Rosa


Boors drinking


Tenters


Christ healing the Sick


Bassan


Back of a Woman


Titian


Landscape -


Zucarelli


Landscape -'


Dean


Landscape and Cattle


Berchem


View of a Port


Weeninx


Inside of a Church


P. Neeffs


Mercury and Battus


Domenichino


A portrait and figures


Teniers


Landscape and figures


Brueghel '



2p



578



APPENDIX. IV.




Small Interior -


Stelnivyck


Cook Maid and Dead Game


Sir N. Bacon


Landscape ; Angel and Balaam


Swanefeld


Landscape - -


S. Rosa


Companion


S. Rosa


Men securing a Bull


P. Potter


St. Tliomas - -


S. Rosa


An Encampment


Wouvermarm


Small Landscape


Brueghel


Companion


Bruegliel


Landscape -


Bolognese


Mary Magdalen


Caracci


Our Saviour and St. Peter


Baroccio


Venus and Adonis


Titian


Holy Family


C. Maratti


St. Augustin


Ag. Caracci


Small Head


Schalken


Head


Vandyck


Landscape -


N. Poussin


Companion -


JS. Poussin



DRESSING ROOM.

Col. Taylor - Kneller

Mr. Grimston, son of William Viscount

Grimston - Kneller

Earl of Arundel.
Our Saviour ; a Sketch - Tintoretto



BED-CHAMBER.

Portrait of Mrs. IValler - Sir J. Reynold*

Flower Piece - T. Baptiste

Snow Piece - - Van Diest



CONVENT OF ST. ANDREWS. 579

Flower Piece - T. Baptiste

Inside of a Church - -P. Neeffs

Entering the Ark - /". Brueghel

LADY GRIMSTON's DRESSING ROOM.

Sea-port Moonlight - - Tliom. Wycke

Cupid m Vandyck

Student Drawing - - Schalken

Landscape J. Brueghel

A Shipwreck - A Van Diest

Landscape - - Paul Bril



NV.

THE RESIGNATION OR SURRENDER OF THE PRIOR AND CON-
VENT OF ST. ANDREWS, NORTHAMPTON : WITH A RECOG-
NITION OF THEIR MANIFOLD ENORMITIES. Page 408.

Most noble and vertuous prince, owr most rightuous and
gracyous soueraign lorde, and vndoubted founder, and in
erthe next vndre God supreme heed of this Englyshe
churche. We yowr gracys pore and most vnworthy sub-
iects, Francys, priour of yowr graces monastery of Saint
Andrew the apostle, within yowr graces town of North-
ampton, and the hoole couent of the same, being steryd by
the gryffe of owr conscience, vnto greate contricion for the
manifolde negligence, enormytes, and abuses, of long tyme
by vs and other owr predecessours, vndre the pretence and
shadow of perfyght religion, vsyd and commytted, to the
greuous displeasure of Almyghty God, the craftye decep-
cion, and subtell seduccion of the pure and symple myndys

2 p 2



580 APPENDIX. V.

of the good Christian people of this yoWr noble realme,
knovvlegen owr selffes to haue greuously offendyd God, and
yowr highnesse owr soueraign lord and founder. Aswell in
corrupting the conscience of yowr good Christian subiects,
with vayne, superstitious, and other vnprofitable ceremo-
nyes, the very means and playn induccions to the abomi-
nable synne of idolatry ; as in omyttyng the execucion of
suche deuowte and due observances, and charitable acts as
we were bounden to do, by the promises, and avovves made
by vs and our predecessors, vnto Almighty God, and to
yowr graces most noble progenitors, orygynall founders of
yowr saide monastery. For the which obseruances, and
dedys of charyte, only, yowre saide monastery was indowed
with sondry possessions, iewels, ornaments, and other goods,
moueable and vnmoueable, by yowr graces said noble pro-
genitors. The revenues of which possessions, we the saide
priour and couent, voluntaryly onely by owr propre con-
science compellyd, do recognyce, neither by vs, nor owr
predecessors to haue ben imploied accordyng to the origy-
nall intent of the founders of yowr saide monastery : that
is to saie, in the pure observaunce of Chrysts religion, ac-



Online LibraryThomas PennantThe journey from Chester to London → online text (page 31 of 34)