Copyright
Thomas Wade.

Mundi et cordis: de rebus sempiternis et temporariis: carmina. Poems and sonnets online

. (page 1 of 8)
Online LibraryThomas WadeMundi et cordis: de rebus sempiternis et temporariis: carmina. Poems and sonnets → online text (page 1 of 8)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Ll







a f>»mtmm



PRESENTATION COPY

896. WADE (Thomas). Mundi et Cordis: De Rebus Sempiternis et Tern
Carmina. Poems and Sonnets. 8vo, boards, uncut. London : John Miller, 1835.

Wordsworth's copy from the author. With inscription, "William Wordsworth Esq with the
innermost heart-respects/' and autograph in Wordsworth's handwriting, "Wm Wordsworth, Rydal ]

Leigh Hunt says of this writer: "He is a poet; he is over-flowing with fancy and sensibility
without the finest subtleties of imagination."




I




r<s»)



K



Cornell University
Library



The original of this book is in
the Cornell University Library.

There are no known copyright restrictions in
the United States on the use of the text.



http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924104000595




cG





")



MUNDI ET CORDIS



CARMINA.



MUNDI ET CORDIS:



D E REBUS



SEMPITERNIS ET TEMPORARIIS



CARMINA.



POEMS AND SONNETS.



By THOMAS WADE.



(t Ed e si spento ogni benigno lume

" Del Ciel, per cui s'informa umana vita,

" Che per cosa mirabile s'addita

" Chi vuol far d'Elicona nascer flume ?"

Petrarch : Seventh Sonne/.



LONDON :

JOHN MILLER, HENRIETTA-STREET,

CO VENT-GAR DEN.



MDCCCXXXV.



MUNDI ET CORDIS:



D E REBUS



SEMPITERNIS ET TEMPORARIIS



CARMINA.



POEMS AND SONNETS.



By THOMAS WADE.



" Ed e si spento ogni benign o lume

" Del Ciel, per cui s'informa umana vita,

" Che per cosa mirabile s'addita

" Chi vuol far d'Elicona nascer riume ?"

Petrarch : Seventh Sonnet.



LONDON :

JOHN MILLER, HENRIETTA-STREET,

COVENT-GARDEN.



MDCCCXXXV,



vft




/A




*** *




t\Ljf



o&



LONDON



PRINTED BY T. C. SAVItL (LATE HARJETTE AND SAVIIL)
107, ST. martin's lane.



TO



BARRY CORNWALL, ESQ.



THIS VOLUME



is



INSCRIBED,



BY



HIS OBLIGED AND OBEDIENT



FRIEND AND SERVANT,



THE AUTHOR.



PREFACE.



In publishing this volume, its Author has not even the
happiness of hope. " In these times," he has but too
much reason to fear that it can receive only a slight atten-
tion even from those whose approbation he most covets,
and for which he would willingly do homage. Men in-
tensely engaged in a tumultuous and engrossing strife, are
not wont to take more than casual heed of the small bird
singing high over their heads, or of the minute flower throw-
ing forth its perfumes at their feet.

In a brief and momentarily-uncertain life, however, he
who, of the many a thousand verses which he may, im-
perceptibly, have written, shall be " fond" enough to deem
that there may happily be some few, or even but a solitary
one, that may embalm his name into an endurance beyond



VUl PREFACE.

that which is the ordinary privilege of dust, does ill to defer
to auspicious opportunity his humble pretensions to re-
membrance; and thus incur the risk of being belated in
that night in which " no man can work/'

Of the following Brevities, many have already been seen
in places where the honourable reception which they have
severally received is their Author's best assurance that they
are not altogether unworthy of appearing in their present
collected form. The greater portion of them, however, and
of the Sonnets more especially, are now for the first time
submitted to the Public.



Bearsted Green;

March, 1835.



CONTENTS.



MUNDI TEMPLUM.

POEMS.

PAO]

1. To PoEsr - - - 5

2. Phosphor and Hesper - - - - 13

3. The Coming of Night - - - 16

4. Dawn - - - 18

5. The Frozen Coast - - - - 20

6. The Winter Shore - 23

7. " Solvitur acris hyems" - - - - 25

8. " Golden-Cap" - 27

9. A Night amid the Sea-ward Hills - - - 29

10. Sympathy - 33

11. Nymphs - - - 34

12. To a Water-Drop - 36

13. To a New-fallen Lamb - 40

14. The Copse : To Alphonse de Lamartiue 42

15. The Nest - - - 45

16. Mind - 47

17. Reality - - 51



CONTENTS.



PAGE



18. Delights - 53

19. Birds and Thoughts - - - - 55

20. " Us " - - - - - - 58

21. Our Life _ - ___ 60

22. Present and Future - 62

23. The Curse of Thought - - - 65

24. Despair _____ 67

25. Farewell to Mortal Life - - - 68

26. Corfe-Castle Ruins - 71

27. The " Belvidera" of Fanny Kerable - - 73

28. The Net-Braiders 74

29. To the Bird's-Eye Flower - - - 76

30. To the Bird's-Eye Flower : Hymn the Second - 78

31. To a Butterfly at Sea - - - 79

32. The Bird - - - 81

33. The Greeting (A Fragment) - - - 83

34. The Dream-Dancers . - - - - 86

35. The Statue - - - 88

36. The Waking Morn 90

37. A Lament for the Past - - - - 91



SONNETS.

1 . The Bride 95

2. Beauty Vanished - - - - - 96

3. The Mingling _____ 97

4. The Present 98



CONTENTS. XI



PAGE



5. The Triumph of Love - 99

6. The Parallel - - - - - -100

7. Comparison - - - _ _ \q\

8. On a Human Heart - - - - - 102

9. To Three Skulls 103

10. Sleep - ___„ 104

11. Space - - - 105

12. Revelation - - - - - - 106

13. Light in Gloom - - 107

14. Solace - - - - - - 108

15. The Journey - - - - - 109

16. Minds and the Universe - - - 110

17. Life and its Dreams - - - - 111

18. The Life Eternal - - - - - 112
19- Enchanted Ground - - - - 113

20. Hope's Need - - - - - 1 14

21. An Exhortation to Mankind - - - 115

22. To the People - - - - - 116

23. The To-Come 117

24. A Prophecy - - - - - 1 18

25. Of Poets - - - - 119

26. Shelley - - - 120

27. Shelley and Keats, and their " Reviewer" - 121

28. " Julian and Maddalo" - 122

29. Taglioni - 123

30. The Trance - - 124

31. The Reproof of Faith - 125



XU CONTENTS.

PJlOK

32. Atomics - - _ - _ 126

33. The Undeceiving - 127

34. Soul- Creation - - - - - 128

35. The Un-charmed - - - - 129
;ili. The Corruption - - - 130

37. " My Tablets, ho!" - - - - 131

38. To my Song - - - - - - 132

39. Royalty - - - - - - 133

40. Philosophy and Impulse. To G* T** - - 134

41. An Anticipation - 135



ADYTA CORDIS.

POEMS.

1. Pain, and Solace : a Vision - - - - 141

2. Prevention - - - - - 143

3. The Appeal - - - - - 145

4. The Cup of Joy - - 148

5. The Creed - - - 150

6. Love's Safety - - - 152

7. The Life of Flowers - - - - - 153

8. To a Glow-worm - - - - 156

9. Evening - - - - - - 161

JO. A Knell - - - 163

U. The Vow - - - - - - 165

12. Consolation - - - - - 167



CONTENTS. Xlll



PAGE



13. The Portrait - - - _ - 170

14. The Veil - - - . . ]72

15. The Heart- Thirst - - - - - 174

16. Fatalism - - - - - 17(3

17. Beauty's Predicament - - - - 178

18. That Day 180

19. A Plea for Absence - - - 183

SONNETS.

1. Indirection - - - - - .137

2. Remember Thee ? - - - - 189

3. " Many;" yet, but " One" - - - - 190

4. A Hymn to Melancholy - - - 191

5. The Change - - - - - 192

6. The Glow-worm - - - - 193

7. The River - - - - - - 194

8. The Letter - 195

9. Possession - - - - - -196

10. Resemblance - - - - - 197

11. The Written Portrait - - - - 198

12. " Here " and " There " - - - - 199

13. The Ring - - - 200

14. The Banquet - - - 201

15. The Hell-Mist - - - - - 202

16. Mother and Child - - - 203

17. The Dream - - - - - - 204

18. The Picture - 205



XIV CONTENTS.



PAGE



19. The Mirth of Sorrow - 206

20. The Sorrow of Mirth 207

21. The Symbol - - __ 208

22. To her Lover - 209
28. Unravelment - - - - - 210
124. The Wood - - . . . 2 li
26. The Crone - - - - . - 212

26. Three Discourses on One Text - - - 213

27. Promise - - - - _ -216

28. The Shame - - - - . 217

29. A Reply - - - 218

30. The Eve of Absence - 219

31. The Pencilled Letter : with the Answer - - 220

32. The Token-Flowers - 223

33. A Mystery's Solution - 224

34. Presence - - - 226

35. The Impossibility - - - 227

36. The " Amen" - - - 228

37. Fidelity - - - 229

38. The Mortal Muse - 230

39. To " the Constellated Flower, that never sets" - 231

40. Love and Poesy - - - 232

41. To "the Pearled Arcturi of the Earth" - - 233

42. Of the Poems of Shakspeare - - - 234

43. ToElectra - - - - - - 235

44. The Heart-Favourite - 236

45. Love- Worship - 237



CONTENTS. XV



TEMPORALIA.



POEMS AND SONNETS.



P A E



46. Contentment - 238

47. The Mandate - _ . - - 239

48. The Tear - 240

49. The Frozen Heart - - - _ - 241

50. The Delusion - 242

51. Love's Winter - 243

52. Bud and Blossom - 244

53. The Stars of Sleep - - - - - 245

54. Heart-Rebellion needed against the World - 246

55. The Tainted - - - - - 24/

56. The Misgiving - 248

57. Reminiscences - 249

58. An Exposition - - - - - 251

59. An Agony - 252

60. Love that Calculates - 253

61. Love's Admiration - 254

62. The Rivalry - - - 255

63. " The Chord-of -the-Dominant " - - - 256

64. A Mother to her New-born Child - - 257



1. The Three Great Days : To the French - - 261

2. France : The 27th, 28th and 29th of July, 1830 - - 269



XVI CONTENTS



PAGE



3. " Reform-Bill" Hymns :

1. The " Newspaper" - 270

2. A Song of the People - - - 271

3. To the Peers - - - - 273

4. To the Commons, at their Squabbles - 274

5. To the Hierarchy - - - - 275

6. To my Country - 275

4. The Bird and Child . - - - 277

5. A Song ' - - - 279

6. Calvus : with Calviultor's Answer - - 281

7. To a Malignant Person - - - 283

8. The Phaetons of Knowledge - - - 284

9. "Publishing" - - 285



MUNDI TEMPLUM.



POEMS AND SONNETS.



h



POEMS.



b 2



I.



TO POESY.

l.

Thou " Wine of Demons !" by dull Flesh abjured,
But the true Essence of all things divine !
The Incense that perfumeth Nature's shrine !

Nectar of the heart and brain !

Spirit's sun-unfolding Rain !
Deep Poesy ! I come to thee, allured
By all that I do hear, scent, touch, or see ;
From the flower's delicate aglet, where the bee
Makes music ; to the depths of sea and ether,
Where winds and waves in fierce love leap together,
And storms are thunder- voiced and lightning-plumed,
And worlds, Creation's sparks, extinguished and illumed !

2.

The mysteries which the Dreamers of old days
Did gird thee with, in many a solemn strain,
Are buried in the grave of our disdain :



Men now no altars to Apollo raise ;



6

And rich-brained Memory's glorious Daughters
Sink in Oblivion's Lethe-waters :
The Mount whence Eros shot his golden arrow
At jeering Phoebus' heart, revered by none,
Hath less advertence than a war-left barrow,
And every spring mates that of Helicon :
The blood-engender^ Horse, the winged vision !
With the child's steed becomes the man's derision ;
Round poet-brows no laurel crownlet clings,
And outward symbols all are scoff'd as idle things !

3.
But life and death remain unread ;
And by the same
Aspiring flame
Their poor inheritors are fed :
And thou and thy sublime rewards,
Deep-dwelling in the mind's regards,
Unchanged, are now as when dark Sappho writ,
Or Cams' wisdom on the world alit.

4.
Some idle voices are gone forth of late,
That thou art fading from the dreamless world ;
But darkness cannot yet decree light's date,
Nor thine imperial flag by slaves be furl'd !



From many a stately and electric pen
Thou still shalt rule and lighten amid men,
Blinding their common being
To teach diviner seeing !
Thou art immortal !
The lurid portal
Which openeth at life's last declivity

Is not for thee ;
For thou wilt hold thine high festivity

Of grief and glee
Till mind with matter shall no longer mingle,
And crush'd be every world where breathing soul doth tingle !

5.

Deep Cell of Honey ! evermore unclosed,

But filling fast as feasted on : thou Flower !

That on the steep of Life aye overpeerest

The ocean of Eternity, and rearest

Thy beauteous head beneath Time's hurricane power,

In which, though shaken, thou hast still reposed :

Even as a green bough waveth o'er a tomb,

Thy glories float above the old world's doom ;

And as sweet blossoms beat to earth by rain

Rise with fresh beauty in the morning sun —

When Barbarism hath thy grace o'errun,



8

Thou with a most tender
And more perfect splendour
Hast blushed reviving o 7 er the world again !

6.

Words, the keen instruments of Mind and Thought,
Are but the semblance which thou deign'st to wear
To make thy godhead visible to sense :
Then, on thy wings and in thy gaze intense
To Heaven by a divine assumption caught,
We mount amid the Soul's ascending thunder ;
Sublimer spirits for awhile appear,
And spurn this clay-work with disdaining wonder !
Deep-mirror'd, in the ocean of the Mind
Thy heavens are in reflected glory kindled ;
Till, like a Typhon, thunder-struck and blind,
We fall, in darkness crush'd — helpless, and dwindled
Into our insect-cells again ! but thou
Dost comfort us with balm :

A holy calm

Falls on our woe ;
We bathe in thy sweet waters of delight,
And, so refreshed, into our mortal night
Droop cheerful as the pinky daisy's eye,
That closeth in the twilight quietly.



9



7.

As many wander by the wondrous Ocean
Only to gather pebbles, thou to millions
Art but as vanity ; but that emotion
Which of the hearts who feast in thy pavilions
Is the ripe-gushing fruit and foaming wine,
Is deep as Bacchus' vat, or Mammon's mine !
Those who despise thee and thy dreamy glories,
Because they know thee not, are dreamers vainer,
Who sleep through their dark life, and think it light ;
Reality their spell-word : but thy sight
Out-glanceth dull day-life ; thy lofty stories
Are clear as their fond creeds, and thy religion plainer.

8.

Oh ! be thou with my dense soul interfused !
That it may float in buoyant gladness
Upon thy stream of sober madness
Over the grave, within itself bemused :
When I am dead, be thou my cenotaph !
As shakes the shingle-foam beneath the wind,
I quiver at thy breath, which whirls the chaff
From out the stored garners of the mind :
Thou dost anneal the spirit, till each hue
O' the outward Universe doth pierce it through



10

And there live colour' d in resemblance rife !
Thy lightning flashes from the clouds of life !
As the eye, eastward nVd afar,
Plucks from the dawn a paling star,
Seen but by a striving vision ;
Thou, with a sublime decision,
Forcest from the Universe
Many a dream and secret golden,
In its depths of glory folden,
And weav'st it into soul-essential Verse !
Like the storm-presaging bird
In the van of thunder heard,
Thou prophesiest of Eternity ;
And from the great To-Come clouds roll before thine eye !

9.

Like the Mseander's, thy sweet streams return,
From their diverse and mazy wandering,

To their bright fountain-urn ;

And to the spirit bring
Tidings of a diviner blossoming,
In meadows far away of endless Spring.
Nature's most common page with thee is fraught ;
Thy flowers expand around us, dew'd and sunny —
But the wing'd hearts by whom thy balm is sought
Are few, and fewer those that find the honey



11

Which sleepeth in the depths of thy perfume :
Bees amass sweetness from the lowliest flower ;
But vulgar insects o'er a world of bloom
Flit, and reveal no nectar-hiving power.

10.
Thy mighty elements, in peace prepared
In the creative chaos of the soul,
Are blent in fury ; and that storm is shared
By all who walk within thy sky's control :
But between them that in thy tempests pant
And thee, is seal'd a rainbow-covenant !
As in the banner'd gloom the dusk Night reareth
The solitary sea-bird disappeared,
Thou fadest in the depths of our despair ;

But Hope's bright dreams arise,

With future-wooing eyes —
And, lo ! thy re-apparent wings burn in the visible air!

11.

The theme that's inexhaustible must cease

All unaccomplished, or for ever flow :
I dedicate my transient being
To thy great altars, thou All-seeing !

Lead me in tumult to thy sovereign peace ;

And print thy kiss of love on my soul's brow !



12

Suffer my footsteps in thy Places Holy ;
And sanctify me with the melancholy
Bom of that exaltation ! — Lo ! I droop ;
And from thine ether to dim silence stoop-
Yet musing of thee : as the lark, descending,
Stills in the lower airs his gushing song ;
And on the quiet mead his voyage ending,
Sits hush'd, as his deep thought did the same strain prolong.



13



II.



PHOSPHOR AND HESPER.

PHOSPHOR.

In a flood of ether I swim, I swim !

My argent lamp dewily burning ;
But, Sister ! thy splendour is dim, is dim !

As an eye to the grave returning —
Why is thy beauty mourning ?

HESPER.

I am weary and sick with dreams,

White Son of the Waking Morn !
For since the sun set in these western streams
I have slept in the midst of my golden beams.

The pillow of air adorning ;
And visions of time and space and heaven
The life in my heart have lulled, or riven;

And now I sink

On night's dim brink,
Like a soul to the grave, that is unforgiven —
Forlorn ! forlorn ! forlorn ! —

Art thou my sadness scorning ?



14



PHOSPHOR.

The starry curtain of the dawn
Hath my silver hand withdrawn,

( )rb of evening splendid !
My joy hath not birth from thy sadness ;
But the sun hath endow'd me with gladness :
From the crystal height of my eastern throne
I behold him ascending alone, alone !

Into heaven, with eye distended —
Like a thought of God in the poet's soul !
His herald-cloud is above me, tinted
With the light his purple kiss imprinted :

Its foldings pallid in dew unrol,
Which the lark, on my lustre calling,
Imbibes in its balmy falling :
I hear the star beneath me sighing
With the burning love on his pale heart lying —
Art thou, too, dying?

HESPER.

I seek my tomb

[n the purpled verge of the night-cloud's gloom
Like hope from the heart, I sink from heaven
Our queen is tranced in a ghostly swoon ;



15

Red-banner'd Mars faints by the fainting moon,
And the constellations around are driven
Into the depths of the brightening dawn —
Like dews by the sphere of a flower absorbed,

Or starting tears in the eye withdrawn !
Only thou art radiant-orb'd :
The morn o'ermantles the earth and sea —
Farewell ! they need not me :

O'er the gulf of night am I clouded !

PHOSPHOR.

Farewell ! I am failing like joy
Which its own sweet excess doth cloy —
Farewell ! in light I am shrouded !



16



III.
THE COMING OF NIGHT.

Night in the east, like to a shrouded nun,
Comes pacing, slow and melancholy, forth,
With all her mystical austerity,
Darkening the hills and billows ; but the west
Still holds fair Day, who, like a dying saint,
Gleams with a holy joy in her last hour,
Mantled in gold and azure ; and two stars
That on her lessening boundary hang in light,
Seem angels minist'ring to her last breath
Some heavenly consolation. Like death on life,
The pall of Night spreads ever on the track
Of fading Daylight, till the west, as east,
Is darkness. Lo ! the stars, Day's funeral lamps,
Hang thick and clustering in the vault of Heaven,
Mirror'd along the ocean, which peals forth
A requiem to the sun ; whilst those two orbs
That leant above the death-bed of the Day
Set, as in righteous sorrow, leaving Night
To all the wide inheritance of Heaven.
She wears her milky girdle o'er her robe



17

Starrily spangled ; and upon the cliffs
And complication of the circling hills.
The wave-swept shore, and all the amplitude
Of air and sea, broodeth in starry vastness.



c



18



IV.

D A W N.

I luiEAK upon the skylark's starry sleep :

Lo ! up to the unclouded vault he springs,

As a quick thought into the brain doth leap,

And to the cresting star of morning sings

A faint and trembling song ; again descending,

And with the interrupted silence blending.

The pale Dawn dreams amid the broken shadows

Of sky and air, of ocean, cliffs and meadows,

Like love, with eyes half-ope, through scatter'd hair

The morning star swings high its silver lamp

O'er the white portal of the ethereal east ;

And beaming upon Vesper, dim and damp

In the pale purple of the western air,

Lights her to sleep in the o'ercurtain'd night,

Fast fading from the banner of the morning

In the advancing van of its adorning.

The fixed star-spheres, from their watch released,

Retire within a veil of blinding light;

And, riding on Aurora's opening lid,

Seem but dream-tears within its lashes hid.



19

As the morn wakes upon her starlight pillow,
The moonbeam pales upon the tranquil billow,
And, like a radiant ghost, slow dies away
In the grey splendour of the kindling day.
In a dim vapour, on the horizon's verge,
Now setteth Hesper faint and weepingly ;
And from the caves of night a murky surge,
Advancing to the forehea d of the sky,
Enfolds in heaving clouds the day-star clear ;
And the cleft orb of the way-weary moon
And one far pilgrim planet's failing sphere
Alone in the dissolving ether swoon.



c 2



>20



v.

THE FROZEN COAST.

1829, 1830.

1.

The winter-wild Seas have laid bare the shore,

And shingle and sand from its stony floor

Swept, and left naked a desert of rocks

That was buried in pebbly depths before ;

And the spray of the waves on their massy blocks —

Of a thousand uncouth and fantastic forms,

The offspring misshapen of billows and storms —

Lies frozen, and white as an old man's hair :

Some are huddled and clad, others lonely and bare;

And from the weeds on the adamant crowd,

Thick, withered and starch'd,

By the keen winds parch'd,

The icicles hang their white frost-woven locks,

Which shell-fish and creatures scarce animate shroud.

Where the waves have receded that blent with the rills

Which rlow'd o'er the beach to the sea from the hills



21

And kiss'd them with freshness, of shingle-pierced ice
Lie glittering curves ; and the unmoving snow
Streaks the cliffs above and the beach below
And enwreathes the far hills with a varied device ;
And smooth frozen sea-weeds are scatter'd around,
Which, suddenly struck, gleam with stars at the wound

2.

A river, the far-pour'd oblation
Of mountain-streamings, in their congregation,
Beneath a veil of ice transparent,
Through which its crystal clear apparent
Gleams like love through chastity,
Flows along the dreary sand ;
Till, breaking from its icy shade,
'Twixt ice-banks, from its waters made,
It trickles coldly to the sea
That foams upon the frozen strand.

3.

On the vast cliffs that heavenward climb,
Which on their brows wear storm-recorded Time,
The frost hath wrought a work sublime !
The manifold descending fountains
Of these cleft and concave mountains



22

Are veil'd within their icy cells,

Portculliced by vast icicles,

That, dagger-like, in each rocky jag,

Hang threateningly from crag to crag ;

And where'er a curving roof

Beetles far into the air,

There is woven a glorious woof

Of ice-threads o'er the ceiling bare ;

Whilst broader streamlets here and there

From the cliff's summit to its base

Lie bright and still in frozen ripples,

Where the faint sunbeams, coldly nurst,

Draw slow drops from those icy nipples,

Which, chained by the frost in their downward chase.

Seem struggling in vain to leap forth as at first —

A charm on my eyes hath burst !

A waterfall bold,

In many a fold

From steep to steep wide sweeping,

Till, perpendicularly leaping,

It sprang to the rocky beach,

In vain hath strived to reach —

For the frozen airs, around it creeping,

In massy ice-bonds clasp it, sleeping,

And there it lives, unheard, but dread,

Like a mighty spirit dead !



2:3



VI.
THE WINTER SHORE.

JANUARY, 1830.

A mighty change it is, and ominous
Of mightier, sleeping in Eternity.
The bare cliffs seem half-sinking in the sand,
Heaved high by winter seas ; and their white crowns,
Struck by the whirlwinds, shed their hair-like snow
Upon the desolate air. Sullen and black,
Their huge backs rearing far along the waves,
The rocks lie barrenly, which there have lain,
Reveal'd, or hidden, from immemorial time ;
And o'er them hangs a sea- weed drapery,
Like some old Triton's hair, beneath which lurk-
Myriads of crowned shell-fish, things whose life,
Like a cellVl hermit's, seemeth profitless.
Vast slimy masses harden'd into stone
Rise smoothly from the surface of the Deep,
Each with a hundred thousand fairy cells
Perforate, like a honeycomb, and, cup-like,
Fill'd with the sea's salt crystal — the soft beds



24

Once of so many pebbles, thence divorced

By the continual waters, as they grew

Slowly to rock. The bleak shore is o'erspread

With sea-weeds green and sere, curl'd and dishevell'd,

As they were mermaids 7 tresses, wildly torn

For some sea-sorrow. The small mountain-stream,

Swoln to a river, laves the quivering beach,

And flows in many channels to the sea

Between high shingly banks, that shake for ever.

The solitary sea-bird, like a spirit,

Balanced in air upon his crescent wings,

Hangs floating in the winds, as he were lord


1 3 4 5 6 7 8

Online LibraryThomas WadeMundi et cordis: de rebus sempiternis et temporariis: carmina. Poems and sonnets → online text (page 1 of 8)