Thomas William Herringshaw.

Local and national poets of America, with biographical sketches and choice selections from over one thousand living American poets; online

. (page 3 of 138)
Online LibraryThomas William HerringshawLocal and national poets of America, with biographical sketches and choice selections from over one thousand living American poets; → online text (page 3 of 138)
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Sturtevant, Susa H., - - Oshkosh, Wis. 816
Summers, Mrs. M. H., - Susanville, Cal. 685
Swan, Caroline D., - - Gardiner, Me. 383
Swanson, Mrs. Effie, - Royalton, Minn. 313
Swarthout, George W.,- Laingsbui-g, Mich. 640
Sweat, Mrs. Margaret, - Portland, Me. 635
Swisher, Mrs. Bella F., - Austin, Texas. 177
Switzer, Mrs. Lizzie A., - Austin, Ind. 357
Sylvester, Herbert M., - Portland, Me. 919



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Taber, Edward F., -
Taber, Charles A.,
Tanner, Alva A.,
Tanner, Mrs. Mary J., -
Tapley, Kimball Chase,
Targett, John Henry, -
Tate, Thomas E.,
Taylor, Henry Kyder-,
Taylor, W. A., -
Taylor, William, -
Ta3'lor, John Vincent,
Taylor, Daniel T., -
Taylor, Louise, ,.
Taylor, Mrs. Clara, -
Taylor, Mrs. Hannah, ■



Brooklyn, N.Y.

Wakefield, Mass.

Oakley, Idaho.

Provo City, Utah.

- St. John's, N. B.
Knig-htsville, Ind.

Osyka, Miss.

San Antonio, Tex.

- Columbus, O.

- Aurora, Ind.

- New York Citj'.
Hyde Park, Mass.

Nashville, Tenn.

Rockville, Conn.

Pasadena, Cal.



Terry, Hercules P., - - Eockport, Tex. 1010
Terry, Sallie Effie, - Big Clifty, Ky. 879

Thayer, Hiram, - - Bradford, la. 917

Thayer, Julia H., - Morgan Park, I IL 47
Thomas, Col. Sam P., - Hawesville, Ky. 308
Thomas, Edith Matilda, - - - - 514
Thomas, Mrs. W. H., - El Dorado, Kan. 109
Thomas, Mrs. Mary A.,- Springfield, Tenn. 949
Thompson, Maurice, - - - - 939

Thomson, Lydia Davis, - Byfleld, Mass. 883
Thorn, Carey V., - Memphis, Neb. 533

Tiffany, Mrs. Emma A., - Orwell, Ohio. 394
Tilton, Mrs. Lydia H., - Washington, D. C. 993
Tipton, Rev. Milton H., - Elgin, Pa. 185

Tirrill, Mrs. Eliza, - - Manchester, la. 849

Todd, F. Asbury, - - Van Wert, O. 297

Torrans, John B., - - Muscogee, I. T. 718
Townsend, Linus, - - Apollo, Pa. 963
Townsend, Mary Ashley, . . - 9(51

Tracy, Mrs. Harriet T., - Sacramento, Cal. 863
Train, Mrs. Emma, - North Collins, N.Y. 586
Trowbridge, John T., - - - -865

Tullis, John B., - Mooi'ingsport, La. 444
Turk, Lizzie May, - - Canton, Minn. 879

Turner, Tom S., - Massey, Texas. 285

Turnley, Hon. P. T., - Highland Park, HI. 37
Tyler, Mrs.M. G , - Huntsville, Kan, 333
Tyrrell, Seymour L., - Fox Lake, Wis. 904



Underwood, Isaac W., -

Updyke, C. W., -

Urich, Mrs. H. LaRue, -



- 812

Piano, Cal. 503

Wilmot, Dak. 1016



Van Burg, Mrs. Lizzie, - - Filley, Neb. 675
Van Denbnrg-, Olive, - Gloverville, N.Y. 397
Van Ness, Rev. John G., - Maquoketa, la. 413



Vance, W.T., -
Vaughn, Frank E..
Veatch, Andrew A.,
Viney, John A., -
Vroom, Adelaide E.,



South Haven, Mich. 618
Leadville, Colo. 209
Brookeland, Tex. 1011
El Paso, Tex. 433
Salisburj', Mo. 440



Walden, Lizzie,
Wallace, M.,
Wallace, Joseph D., -
Wallace, W. DeWitt, -
Walsh, Mrs. Marie,
Ward, Rev. James T., -
Warder, Col. George W
Ware, Eugene Fitch, •
Warner, Daniel S.. -
Warren, Robert F.. -
Warrener, William J.,
Waters, Gay,



Union City, Ind.

- Huntsville, Tex.

- Oakdale, Pa.

La Fayette, Ind.

Brooklyn, N.Y.

Westminster, Md.

,- Kansas City, !Mo.

Fort; Scott, Kan.

Windsor, Mo.

Bellevicw,Ky.

Federal, Ohio.

Wilmington, Ohio.



Watkins, Jas. H. J., - East Schuyler, N.Y.



Watson, William F.,
Watson, Stephen M.,-
Wear, Robert Duke, -
Weaver, W. J.. -



Greenville, S. C.

- Portland, Mo.
Granbury.Tex.

- Mill Hall, Pa.



395
918
659
958
4:33
593

33
783
515

88
4.57
331
4S9
453
651
937
168



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LOCAL AND KATIONAL POETS OF AMERICA.



Webt), Mrs. Emily P.,
Webster, John A., -
Webster, Mrs. E. H.,-
Weeks, Laviuia P., -
AVeleome, Mrs. Lilla,
Wells, Mrs. E. B
Werden, EUas, -



Skowhegan, Me.

Jobuscra City, Kan.

Hyde Park, Mass.

Hopkinton, N. H;

- Scraiiton, Pa.

- Salt Lake City, Utah.

Pittsfleld, Mass.



White, Rev. Hiram B., - Orwell, Ohio.

White, Dillard D., - Bryan's Mill, Tex.
White, J. H., - - Archbold, Pa.

White, William W., - Ashford, Neb.
Whitehead, Mrs. L. K., - Eestus, Mo.

Whitehead. Edith L., - Nunda, N.Y.
Whiting-, Mrs. Mary, - - Belmond, Ta.
Whitman.Mrs. L. B.,- - Lewisburg-, Pa.
Whitman, Mrs. Isa, - - Buckfleld, Me.
Whitman, Plaisted, - Buckfleld, Me.

Whitman, Walt,

Whiting-, S. K., - Kansas City, Mo.
Whitney, Adeline D. T., - -
Whitney, Orson F.,- Salt Lake City, Utah.
Whitney, Hattie, - - St. Louis, Mo.

Whitien, Martha E., - Austin, Tex.
Whittet, Robert, - Eichmond, Va.

Whittier, John G., - Amesbury, Mass.

Wiard, Editha E., - Silver Creek, Neb.
Wieding-, William H., - Fort Branch, Ind.
Wight, Emma H., - Fisher's Hill, Va.
Wilcox, Ella Wheeler, - Meriden, Conn.
Wilcox, Dr. Hamilton, - Albert Lea, Minn.
Wilkes, Bev. W., - Syllacauga, Ala.
Willard, Hoi-ace B., - Fort Atkinson, Wis.
Williams, Eev. Dwight, - Cazenovia, N.Y.
Williams, Eev. D. B., Petersburg, Va.

Williams, Violet, - - Lansing, Iowa.

Williams, Daisy C, - - - Newark, O.
Williams, Mrs. Josephine, Centralia, Wash.
Williamson, Julia May, - Augusta, Me.
Willner, Eev. Wolf, - - Newark, N. J.
Wilson, Lemuel, Wessington Springs. Dak.
Wilson, Thomas E., - Eoxbury Mass.



756
200
922
653
745
746
193
907
610
969
914
115
795
42
945
484
926
161
932
970
155
571
905
199
355
778
311
539
391
611



Wilson, Gilbert L., -
Wilson, Joseph T.,
Wilson, Mrs. E. A., -
Wilstaeh, John A., -
Wince, John Laight,
Wince, Mrs. Saiah,-
Winsett, Mary Cordelia,
Wjnter, William, -
Wintermute, Mrs. Martha,



Center Point, la.
Richmond, Va.

Norwich, Conn.
La Fayette, Ind.

Pierceton, Ind.

Pierceton, Ind.
Pikeville, Tenn.



Newark, O



Wirth, Charles, -
Witty, George G., -
Wolf, Mrs. Maggie,
Wood, Mrs. Emma,
Wood, Charles N., -
Wood, Julia A. A.,



- Fort Branch, Ind.

Milburn, Ky.

Dayton, O.

Easthampton, Mass.

Broome Center, N.Y.

St. Paul, Minn



Woodbridge, Prof. A. A., - Boston, Mass.
Woodmansee, Mrs. Emily, Salt Lake City.



Woodrow, Fred,
Woods, Mrs. Kate T., -
Woodward, Edward P., -
Woodward, Nathan A.,
Woodward, Mary C. S.,
Woolen, Frank D., -
Woolson, Mrs. Abba G.,
Worch, Eudolph,
Worthen, Mrs. A. H., -
Wright, Mrs. S. M..-
Wright, Mrs. C. M. H., -
Wright. Nehemiah,
Wyatt, Rosa, -
Wyttenbach, John, -



- Claremont,Va.

- Salem, Mass.
Portland, Me.

■ Batavia, N. Y.
Osborn, O.
Alma. Neb.

- Boston, Mass.
Jackson, Mich.

- Lynn, Mass.
Charles City, la.

Blaine, III.

Chatham, 111.

- Kennard, Ind.

• Rockport, Ind.



874
720
456
383
887
887
893
674
153
476
156
782
709
744
1003
, 913
807
660
445
655
951
234
80
908
471
1017
906
47
983
216
648



Yexter, William J., - - Winchester, O. 626
York, Charles S., • Chestnut Bluff, Tenn. 633
York, Wiliiam DeWitt - St. Louis, Mo. 679
Yost, Mrs. j\L Edith, Sulphur Springs, Ind. 809
Young, Mrs. Fannie Spear, Longview, Tex. 828



Ziegler, Rev. D. P.,
Zimmerman, J.,



Keystone, Kan. 947
- ' Herald, 111. 302



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LOCAL AND NATIONAL

POETS OF AMERICA.



COLONEL GEO.W. WARDER.

Born : Eichmond, Mo.
When but a boy in years Mr Warder taught
school, studied law, and was a practicing- at-
torney at Chillicothe, Mo. He is a lawyer, a
business man, a financier, a scholar, and a




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COLONKL r,t(). W. WARDER.

poet. Mr. Warder has issued three volumes
of verse, which have attracted considerable
attention, and established for the author an
enviable reputation; in 1873 appeared Poetic
Writings or College Poems; in 1874 Eden Deli
or Love's Wanderings; and his third volume,
a collection of his finest poems, entitled
Utopian Dreams and Lotus Leaves, was is-
sued from the London press in 1885. Since
his residence in Kansas City, Col. Warder has
attained a position of prominence and influ-
ence in the communitj'. He is president of
the Mining Exchange, a director in the Expo-
sition Association, the Warder Grand Opera
House,Newsboys Home, and is connected with
many enterprises and charitable institutions.



WOMAN.

Methinks, o'er all the realms of space.

Creative hand ne'er meant to trace
A nobler form, or fairer face,

With brighter charm, or sweeter grace.
Than woman, who was sent to cheer

Man in his lonely, hapless fate,
With kindness and afl:ection's tear.

And lead him to a higher state.
Her charming face and trusting heart

Wakes in his breast heroic flame;
For her he toils by strength and art.

To carve his way to wealth and fame.
He tills the soil, and sails the fleet.

Subdues the earth, explores its wilds,
To lay his treasures at her feet.

For her approving love and smiles.
In every land where women stand

In loving beauty by man's side.
His rudeness turns to manners bland.

And truth and honor in his pride.
First at the cradle and the grave.

With swelling heart and anxious breath.
She ope's the eyes of great and brave.

And shuts them in the glare of death.
Then lordly man, that scoffs at fear.

At your own hearth, or where ye roam,
Strive with true love to bless and cheer

This angel of our earthly home.



MEMORY AND IMAGINATION.

There's a world within as a world without.
And the mighty depths of the human soul
Is a boundless sea where the billows roll
To the zephyr's sigh, and the thunder's sliout;
Where voices come from the sobbing years
Like watching stars in their dreanij- splieres.
And the soul, Uke earth in its mystic flight.
Is half in shadow and half in light.
Thou mighty magicians to stir the heart
To its silent depths with thy voice of tears.
Pouring its pathos of tremulous fears.
Till the troubled sea of the soul will start.
And feeling and passion like billows roll
From the sighing heart to the sobbing soul;
Eyes dreamy and blue as the tranquil sea;
Face beaming and changeful, pleasing and
fair;



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34



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LOCAL AND NATIOXAL POETS OF AMJEKICA.



Voice sad and sweet as a Magdalen's prayer
To a pardoning Chi'ist when He set her free.
Thy genius, purpose and mission grand
Teaches men to feel and their souls expand,
That mercy may blend with her loving eyes.
The joys of earth with the dreams of the
skies.



THY FACE IS FAIR AND LOVELY.

Thy face is fair and lovely.

Thine eyes are softly blue.
And who could help but love thee.

Who knows thy heart so true.

Who knows the wealth and depth of love

That in thy bosom glows,
The purity like heaven above.

That from thy spirit flows.

Thy soul looks through the doors of sight.
And beams from out thine eye

With golden light, both pure and bright.
As angels passing by.

And once I gazed into those eyes
That beam with heavenly thought.

And felt the ties of love I prize.
Still nearer to me brought.

That hour I never shall forget.

But memory will retain it.
And time will only deeper set

That diamond gem within it.

Then fleeting time did plume her wing,

And dip her feet in pleasure,
And from the streams of bliss did bring

TJs gladness without measure.

The zephyrs sang unto the sea,
The golden stars were beaming.

While hope, like bird on pinions free.
Her sweetest dream was dreaming.

Endymion on the moonlit hills
Ne'er bathed in Cynthia's smiling,

And felt the sweet enrapturing thrills,
As in that hour's beguiling.



ee-



MARY ANDERSON.
Interpreter of truth and art,

With regal form and queenly grace?

A matchless poem is thy face.
Where glowing thoughts of beauty start
Like heart that speaketh unto heart.
What majesty of gentle truth

Is thy sweet charm of womanhood;

So winning, fair, and nobly good.
Like genius in its mystic youth,
A peerless thing of joy and truth.
Bright empress of a fairer land

Than czar, or king, or magnates rule.

Where beauty, heart and truth's at school.



And in angelic livery stand.
Like sunlit isles in summer land.
Thou standest proudly and alone
In art, expression, form and grace.
And changing beauties of thj- face.
And sweetness of thy voice and tone.
Like sceptred genius on a throne.
Then fair as love and sweet as bliss.
Press on and win the world's applause.
Nor in thy charming splendor pause
Till deathless fame thy brow shall kiss.
And heaven shall bring eternal bliss.



SADDEST THOUGHTS MAKE SWEETEST
SONG.

When the twilight shades are falling

And the even-tide is near.
Comes the voice of memory calling.

Soft as falling of a tear;
And from shadows dim and fleeting

Come the saddest songs and greeting;
Yet the sweetest that I hear.
And I dream the olden dreaming

In the gloaming by the way.
And life's rosy-tinted gleaming

Seems to crown the closing day;
And my heart and brain and being
Wrapt in visions I am seeing.

Sad, yet brightest that I may!
O! our saddest thoughts are sweetest!

For they span a broader sea.
Soaring eagle-winged and fleetest

O'er the world of memory.
Hope crowned, heavenward and untiring.
To the good and loved aspiring.

They are calling unto thee.
Like the murmur of bright rivers

In the Islands of the Blest,
Where the solemn music quivers

Like a birdling in its nest.
Come the smiles of those who love us
From the far-off heavens above us,

And our saddest songs are best.



KISS OTJR DARLING AND COME AWAY.

EXTKACT.

Dead! Our darling is dead, dear wife.
His angel spirit has heavenward fled;
His little feet will no longer tread
The rugged paths of this sorrowing Ufa.
Kiss his forehead of marble clay.
Kiss our darling and come away.
Fair was his lovely form, dear wife.
Bright and sunn.v his cherub face;
See what a dimple the angels did trace.
When they kissed him first on the shores of
life.
Kiss him again, for only to-day
Can you kiss our darling, and come away



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LOCAL AND NATIONAL POETS OF AMERICA.



35



REV. JEREMIAH E. RANKIN.

Born: Thornton, N. H.
Graduating at Andover theological semin-
ary in 1854, Mr. Raukiu has since preached in
Potsdam, N.Y., St. Albans, Vt., Lowell and
Charleston, Mass., and for thirteen years has
been pastor of the First Cougregational




REV. JEREMIAH EAMS RANKIN.

church of Washington, D. C, where he still
labors. The Kev. Rankin is called the Radi-
cal Poet Preacher of the Capital; he has a
clear and sympathetic voice, and has become
very popular. He has published numerous
hymns, poems and sermons. A volume en-
titled Subduing King-doms, and other Ser-
mons, appeared in 1883; and in 1889 appeared
Broken Cadences, a poem in three parts.



TEARS.

The tears which here are flowing

In this dark world below.
At night an angel bears them

Above earth's hills of snow.
It is so far to Heaven,

And tears so heavy be.
That many a tear is dropping'

Back to the deep, deep sea.
But, when to earth descending,

A gathered teardrop goes.
It blooms a thing of beauty,

A snow-white lily blows.
Perhaps a lily blossoms

On earth there blooms a flower.



As I from home an exile.
Have swept this twilight hour.



A BOON THE STARS.
O snawie feet, sae veined wi' blue,

ankles limp an' roun',

Wi greetin' een, I've sought for you,

All up the warl an' doun.
Aboon the stars? I ken, I ken.

What service do they there?
Does Heav'n itsel' need little men,

To make its mansions fair?
Do little feet riu in an' oot?

Is bairnheid laughter heard?
Ah ! that's the Heav'n me to suit,

1 catch the sweet, sweet word.
An' sal I meet my bairn aboon?

My bonnie, wee, wee bairn?
Hoo aft, at night, I sit an' croon,

Sae pierciu' is the aim !
An' mithers may be mithers there,

An' bairns still bairns may be,
Wi' glowin' cheek, an' flowin' hair.

An' childhood ecstasy?
At least, until I better ken,

I'll dream the pleasant thought;
Nor think our bairns grow up to men.

An' sae, alas, are not !



BROKEN CADENCES.

EXTRACT.

My childhood sense and vision
Of things elysian.

How can I ever lose?
For all things that I see
Are more to me.

If wet with life's fresh morning- dews:
The light they keep, in which at first
They on my being- burst.

For, not a paltry thing of years.

Whose sense grows dim and vision blears.
Can childhood be,
A transient ecstasy ;

It is God's kingdom, where

He keeps all things unfolding fair;
Where every sight
Perennial yields a fresh delight:

The colors cannot fade

His hand upon them laid.
Have we the sense divine, i
To know his touch and sign.
The childhood siMrit still shall find
The childliood mind.
If but life's burdens we unbind.

Ourselves escape from brooding cares.

If we but offer childhood's prayers.
The old time sights and sounds
Will burst their upland bounds,

And flood our being unawares:



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36



LOCAI. AND NATIONAL POETS OF AMERICA.



JULIA HARRIS MAY.

Born: Strong, Me.
After graduating- at Mt. Holyoke seminary.
Miss Julia H. May then spent several years
teaching- in the south. Since 1868 Miss May




JULIA HARRIS MAY.

has been at the head of a private school in
Strong-. The poems of this lady have appear-
ed extensively in the leading religious and
literary journals.



IP WE COULD KNOW!
If ■we could know

Which of us, darling-, would be flrst to g-o,
Which would be first to breast the swelling

tide.
And step aline upon the other side, —
If we could know !

If it were you,

Should I walk softly, keeping death in -view?
Should I mj' love to you 'Host oft express?
Or, should I grieve you, darling, any less —
If it were you?

If it were I,
Should I improve the moments flitting by.
Should I more closely follow God's g-reatplan.
Be filled with sweeter charity to man.

If it were I?

If we could know !

We cannot, darling-; and 'tis better so.



I should forget, just as I do to-day.
And walk along the same old stumbling way.
If I could know.

I would not know
Which of us, darling, will be first to go.
I only wish the space may not be long-
Between the parting- and the greeting- song-,—
But when, or where, or how we're called to go,

I would not know.



ARE THEY GLAD?
If she were here

To take my hand, and ask, " What is it dear?"
She would not see the furrows on my face.
Nor note the silver where the gold had place;
Upon my faded lii) she'd leave a kiss.
And whisper: " Darling-," and she would not

miss
The vanished rose; or, if she did, would say,
" How you have ripened since I went away !"
The blemishes that others might despise
Would still be beautiful in mother's eyes.

If she were here

She would not mind the changes; if a tear

Should fill my eye I know that she would see.

And give sweet consolation unto me;

Yet, in her heart, some things would little

heed.
Knowing how much their discipline I need.
And so, 1 think, though Heaven be not far.
And friends can see us as we are.
They may be glad, like loving- motherhood.
Because they know all things work for g-ood.



THE AWAKING.

As a sweet baby, from his morning dream
Awakes, sometimes, and lies without a

soiind,
And all his rose-bud fingers twirl around.
The while his violet-eyes, half open, se^ m
Their petals to unfold, and pink cheeks beam
As if glad thoughts the little brain had

found;
But, when the mother's step upon the
ground
He hears, his red lips speak the word supreme
In mother's hearts, " agoo,"

So, we shall rise
Perchance, when we awake from life's brief

sleep.
Not all at once, but lie in rapt surprise.
And eye and lip all motionless shall keep
Until we speak, as new-born powers expand.
Some glad sti-ange word, that God shall un-
derstand.



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LOCAL AND NATIONAL POETS OF AMEUICA.



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HON.P. T. TURNLEY.

Born : Dandridge, Tenn., Sept. 6, 1827.
For twenty-six years Mr. Turnley was in the
army. He was married in 1853 to Miss Mary




HON. p. T. TURNLEY.

Rutter. Mr. Turnley is a resident of High-
land Park, 111., of which city he is Mayor.



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MY LITTLE CANOE.
I was dreaming- last night, of a beautiful

stream,
Of long- years ago, when scarcely thirteen,
Wlien the happiest hours that fell to my lot
In sunshine or shade, whether chilly or hot.
Were those which I spent without hat or a

shoe [canoe.

Poling round through the rapids in my little
Not an Indian who lived, whether young one

or old,
Could equal my skill in the use of the pole.
Over ledges of rock so higli and so thick
Whei-e the wild waters rushed so rapid and

quick, [true,

I could shoot my frail bark as an arrow so
Yet touch not a stone with my little canoe.
Down through the rapids, and over the

shoal,
I steered my canoe with a rough hickory pole;
Still down to the eddies so deep, clear and

calm, [sp;in.

That pebbles two fathoms appeared but a
Where the tall willow trees that grew on the

shore
Appeared roots to sky and tops down below.



Then silent and smooth on the waters serene.
My miniature craft would glide down the

stream.
Every object I saw on the land or in air
Seemed joined at the earth to anotlier as fair.
My own chubby face seemed actually two.
As seen In the deep, from my little canoe.
There, under yon oak, just below the old mill.
Where the rapids are lost, in the eddies so

still,
Where willows and weeds grow thick and so

rank, [bank.

And the buckeye and birch lean over the
Where oft I went swimming the summer's

day through.
Is the place, I am sure, where I tied my

canoe.
The pine board paddle, which blistered my

hand.
And the rough hickory' pole, I stuck in the

sand;
Slipped the old hempen line through a ring in

the bow.
Which I roguishly stole from Mark's little

scow.
Then tramped down the weeds, just wet with

the dew.
And made fast to a limb, my little canoe.
It was lonely and dark, 'neath that old oaken

tree,
And under those willows still darker to me;
For the few twinkling stars were hid from

my sight.
As they kissed tiny waves that leaped into

light;
Then an owl's sudden shriek, and solemn too-

hoo.
Made me tremble with fear as I tied mj-

canoe.

Of the many who lived on the farm at that

time.
Only Hannah and Mark still linger behind!
But of those whom I knew, to have lived on

that shore,
There appeared in my dream, a great many

more;
And high above all distinctly in view.
Sat one who had watched me in my canoe.
It was she who most loved liei; rollicking boy,
At the age when the lad tliinks most of his

toy;
And she looked just the same, to me in my

dream.
As when watching me splash in that beauti-
ful stream ;
But, the moment my dream seemed perfect

and true,
Mary moved her left arm and swamped my

canoo!



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LOCAL, AND jSTATIOJSTAL POETS OF AMERICA.







EPIGRAM.
I recount you a tale,

It is not very long-
And was writ on my heart as I heard it.
It has ne'er heen chanted

In story or song,
For only the feeling might word it.

'Twas the evening of battle;

AU day the shots sped
O'er the field which thefoeman was winning.
And yonder a hillock

Ringed round with the dead,
Marked the spot of its fatal beginning.

A battery planted

Begrimed o'er with smoke.
Frowned down on the pitiful scene.
And the sobs of the dying

The dead stillness broke
Where the boom of the cannon had been!

Its guns were all silent,

Not a man stood to tell
The tale of a day that was lost;
But each stiflfened corpse

On the spot where he fell,
Told they died every man at his post.

One last gun stood loaded ;

The fuse that had called
Half a score of brave souls to their God,
Was cleached in the hand

Whose strong sinews had palled
E'er it sped the dire missile of blood.

And now from the reeking sword.

Bleeding and pale.
The captain mounts up to his gun ;
'Tis our last shot, my braves;

It shall bear them our tale.
From the field that they dearly have won.

But sharp from the thicket

A horseman sprang- forth.
Dismounted and called the " Surrender!"
This land, thou aggressor.

Is the land of my birth,
And I am its faithful defender.

Your sword, dying man.

Quick dowQ on your knee,
For grace that you ne'er would have given,
A soldier strikes not.

At the wounded like thee.
Quick shrive you, and hie you to Heaven.

They stood face to face.

And the gaze eye to eye
Was a gaze full of hate and defiance;
Demand of the coward to yield;

My reply.
And this trusty sword my reliance.

Bach soldier that lies

On this gore-covered sod.



m-



Shall give nerve to my arm as I wield it,
And not till my spirit
Goes up to its God,
Shall living man say that I yield it.

I fight for the right

And my quarrel is just,
'Tis my country, when war is upon her;
The sword which I liold.

Has never seen rust,
Nor shall it now suffer dishonor.

But first tell me thy name.

And thy place vaunting foe?
'Tis no quakiug fear that demands it.
But 'twill strengthen my arm

That my spirit shall know
What heel spurns this dust as I leave it?

That proud foeman's brow.

Great rolling drops lave ;
His grim eyes with tears grew mellow,
For Bravery's eye



Online LibraryThomas William HerringshawLocal and national poets of America, with biographical sketches and choice selections from over one thousand living American poets; → online text (page 3 of 138)