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Thomas Wood Stevens.

The book of words of the pageant and masque of Saint Louis; online

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I



The Book of Words

of

The Pageant and Masque

of Saint Louis



The Words oj the Pageant by
THOMAS WOOD STEVENS

The IVords oJ the Masque by
PERCY MACKAYE




SECOSD EDITION



Published by Authority oJ the Book Committee

Saint Louis Pageant Drama Association

1914



The Pageant.
Copyrighted 1914, by Thomas Wood Stevens



The Masque.
Copyrighted 1914, by Percy MacKaye




PREFACE.

This historical pageant and the following civic
masque were prepared under the authority of the
Book Committee of the St. Louis Pageant Drama
Association, organized to present the Pageant and
Masque of St. Louis in Forest Park on May 28-31,
1914, in celebration of the 150th anniversary of the
founding of St. Louis.

The general procedure in both cases was outlined
or approved by the Committee, which selected the
historical episodes to be used in the Pageant, and
supervised the general preparation of this book.



Arthur E. Bost

^liss Zoe Akins,
Mr. Eugene Augert.
Mr. P. Taylor Bryan.
Mr. Wm. C. Breckenridge,
Rev. John C. Burke, S. J.,
Hon. Walter B. Douglas,
Mr. Alex DeMenil,
Miss Amelia Fruchte,
Hon. Chas. F. Krone,



wick, Chairman.

Mrs. Chas. P. Johnson,
Prof. John L. Lowes,
Mr. Theophile Papin,
Mr. William Marion Reedy,
Mr. Mont Schuyler,
^Ir. Walter B. Stevens,
Mr. Thomas E. Spencer,
^Ir. Gustavus Tuckerman,
Mr. Tyrrell Williams,

Book Committee.



277070



PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.

The demand for this book, consequent upon tlie
great success of the production in Forest Park, has
led the Executive Committee to issue a second edi-
tion.



The Saint Louis
Pageant Drama Association



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE.

John H. Guudlach, Chairman.
Heury W. Barth, Vice-Chairman.
Luther Ely Smith, Secretary.
Benjamin J. Taussig, Treasurer.
Charlotte Rumbold. Executive Secretary.
Dwight F. Davis. Arthur E. Bostwiek.

Mrs. Philip N. Moore. William La Beaurae.

Chas. A. Stix. F. H. Smith.

George W. Simmons. Lambert E. Walther.

Otto F. Karbe. Mrs. Sarah Spraggon.

FINANCE COMMITTEE.
Charles A. Stix, Chairman.



PRODUCTIONS COMMITTEE.

William La Beaurae, Chairman.

Charlotte Rumbold. Associate Chairman.

Chairmen of Sub-committees: Arthur E. Bostwiek,
Book: Eugene S. Wilson, Cast; Dwight F. Davis, Dancing;
Geo. E. Kessler, Stage Setting; Mrs. Frederick R. Von
Windegger, Costumes; Percival Chubb, Stage Management;
Chas. P. Pcttus. Proprrfirs; Charles M. Talbert. Audito-
rium; A. 1. Jafobs. Liffhfing; George D. Markham, Music.

5



TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE.
George J. Tansey, Chairman.

LEGAL COMMITTEE.
Lambert E. Walther, Chairman.

PRESERVATION OF HISTORICAL MATERIAL.
Mrs. Philip N. Moore. Chairman.

ASSOCIATIONS COMMITTEE.
Otto F. Karbe. Chairman.

ENTERTAINMENT COMMITTEE.
Melville L. Wilkinson, Chairman.

PUBLICITY COMMITTEE.
Herbert S. Gardner, Chairman.

CONFERENCE OF CITIES COMMITTEE.
Mrs. Ernest R. Kroeger, Chairman.

SANITARY COMMITTEE.
Dr. Max C. Starkloff, Chairman.

PUBLIC SAFETY COMMITTEE.
H. M. Blossom, Chairman.

POLICE COMMITTEE.
Samuel B. MePheeters, Cliairman.

AUTHORS AND DIRECTORS.

Thomas Wood Stevens,

Author and Director of the Pageant.

Percy MacKaye,

Author and Director of the Masque.

Joseph Lindon Smith, Stage Director of the Masque.

Frederick S. Converse, Composer of the Masque Music.

Noel Poepping, Musical Director.

Frederick Fischer, Chorus Director.

Ernest R. Kroeger, Composer of March of the Pioneers.

Joseph Solari, Assistant Stage Director.

6




THE PAGEANT OF SAINT LOUIS

PERSONS REPRESENTED.

In Order of Entrance.

First Movement.

A High Priest.
A Young Chief.
A Hunter.
Hernando De Soto.
A Sachem.
A Calumet Bearer.
A Medicine Man.
A Boy.

Father Marciuette.
Louis JoUiet

Kol)ert Cavelier La Salle.
A Voyageur.

Henry de Tonty. ^ r^ u

Mound Builders. Indians, Hunters, Spanish and b rench
Explorers.

Second Movement.
Auguste Chouteau.
A Boatman.
Joseph Taillon.

7



A Missouri Chief.

Pierre Laclede.

Louis St. Ange de Belle Rive.

Captain Fraiieois De Volsey.

.ludfje Jos('i)h Lefebvre.

Jose})]i La))useiere.

A Settler.

Gov. Pedro Piernas.

Father Gibault.

Jean Baptiste Trudeau.

Raymond Quesnel.

Gov. Fernando de Leyba.

Madame Rigauelie.

Louis Coignard.

Charles Gratiot.

Pierre Chouteau.

Meriwether Lewis.

Capt. Amos Stoddard.

Carlos Dehault Delassus.

Indians, Settlers. Trappers, Spanish, French, English
and American Soldiers.



Third Movement.

William Henry Harrison.

James "Wilkinson.

John F. Riddiek.

Aaron Burr.

Pierre Chouteau.

William Clark.

Gov. Edward Coles.

Thomas H. Benton.

Marquis de Lafayette.

Capt. David B. Hill.

Private Moore.

Mayor William Carr Lane.

Alexander Bellisime.

James B. Bowlin.

Wilson McGunnegle.

Col. Thornton Grimsley.

Col. A. B. Chambers.

Mayor Bryan ]\Iullanphy.

Richard Spotswood Blennerhassett.

Dr. Sykes.

Col. Alex. W. Doniphan.

Hunters, Trappers, Pioneers, Indians, Farmers, Citizens.
Soldiers, Immigrants.

8




FIRST MOVEMENT

[The stage is set with trees aud with a few dwellings
of a monnd])uilder village partially concealed in the
foliage.

At the right of the stage is a partially constructed
inoimd ; on the top of this a fire, burned low.

Enter, as the overture closes, the High Priest and
two acolytes, coming up over the mound from the
back.]

THE HIGH PRIEST
The fire — the fire sleeps.
Blow away the ashes, my brothers,
That the smoke may rise upward,
And the cloud manitous be not angry.

[As he speaks, the two acolytes kneel and blow the
fire till the .smoke ascends.]

Smoke of our fire,

Speak for us to the cloud manitous — speak for ns.
Rid them let fall tlie sweet rain
That the corn may grow green in our fields,
For we are their children.
[To the acolytes.]

Stay, ray brothers.

Make the smoke talk to the far off lodges;
Make it carry our sorrow to the mounds ;
The mounds that are beyond the Great Kiver.
Make it say to the people that we cry aloud





That we weep for our chief, who was wise, wlio was

brave, who was strong —
For our chief is dead.

[The acolytes work over the fire with mats, making
the smoke rise in intermittent puffs.

The High Priest makes lamentation, calling the
people to the mound.]

Ohe, Olio, Ohe!

Our chief is cold — he is dead.

Ohe, Ohe, Ohe!

[The people come in, gathering around the foot of
the mound, beating their breasts and crying out with
the Priest. Others come in bringing the implements
of their daily work.]

THE PEOPLE

Ohe, Ohe, Ohe ! Our chief is dead.

[The various craftsmen of the tribe set about their
work, weaving upon looms, making pottery, chipping
flints, scraping hides, and the like.]

THE HIGH PRIEST
The earth, my children.
Bring hither the red earth.

Heap high this mound where our chief shall sleep.
[The people bring earth in baskets, coming up in
single file to lay it on the mound.
The High Priest chants.]

The earth — the red earth, my children.

Heap it high, that the spirits of the dead may

be glad,
That the earth-gods may dance in the darkness.
That the river manitous may not tear at our graves

when they are maddened with the floods of spring;
The earth, the red earth, my children.

[The chant is broken by a .sound of wailing and the
beating of tom-toms behind the mound, and a new
group enters in procession, bearing the dead chief to
the summit. They bring the dead chief's possessions
and range them around the body. The people wail and
beat their breasts; the High Priest stills them.]
10



Manitous of the earth, of the river, of the cloud,

And thou, blaster of Life,

Hear now the death song of our chief.

[As he chants the death song, the people bring earth
in baskets, and heap it around the dead chief.]

He is as the hare tree in snow time.

As the trodden leaf

He is withered,

As the fallen branch

He is broken:

Hear now his death song.

There is no lodge where his bow shall hang —

Only the lodge of the dead,

In the smoke of the dark caverns,

In the cold night;

Hear now his death song.

[Enter, from the left, crossing the stage at a run, the
Young Chief and two Hunters. They have bows, and
carry on their shoulders fresh buffalo skins. They
pause near the mound and call to the people.]

THE YOUNG CHIEF
Hearken, my Ijrothers !

The buffalo — they feed along the plain of the sun-
set.
We have heard. We have seen. We have slain.

[They throw down the skins.]
Behold the hot pelts we have taken.
We have run hither that our hunters may follow
them with arrows.

[There are loud cries from the people — "The buf-
falo! Take Bows!"]

THE HIGH PRIEST
[Standing between the Young Chief and the dead man.]

Stay my children.
Set not your feet to this luintiug.

11



Toil on in tlio s"ooJ red earth,

Tliat the nionnils may lift their heads above your

fields,
And the nianitous be not angry,
And the dead sleep sound.

THE YOUNG CHIEF
He is old, my brothers.
His feet are heavy for this hunting.
But we have seen the land bhick with tlic herds

against the sunset.
We call you to the trails and the feasting.

THE HIGH PRIEST
The corn will ripen if the fields be guarded,
But the lodge of the hunter is empty when the snows
break around it.

THE YOUNG CHIEF
The fields are for women.

Let them gather the corn. Let them grind it in
winter.

THE HIGH PRIEST

This hunter is young. He is the son of a chief.

I am old. And each year the buffalo graze nearer

the Great River.

Let the young chief command you.

But first let him stand here on the mound

Where I stand.

[He moves aside, showing the body of the dead chief.
The Young Chief comes up the mound. As he stands
beside the l)ody there is a pause ; then the High Priest
uncovers the head of the dead man. The Young Chief
cries out as if struck, and falls beside the body.]

THE FIRST HUNTER

[Speaking from below.]

A man lives or he dies.

Shall the herds pass onward and we still be hungry?

12



THE PEOPLE
Take bows ! To the bunting !

THE HIGH PRIEST
Call now on your Chief.
Let him lead you.

[The Young Cliii'f ris.'s jiid di-aws liiniself up to
speak.]

THE YOUNG CHIEF
You shall go to the feasting,
But I — I will not lead you.

[There is a great shout, and the men of the tribe
troop oif. The Young Chief stands looking straight
before him ; the High Priest crouches, watching them
go.]

THE HIGH PRIEST
The hunters go out — the young men,
And the mounds are left alone.

THE YOUNG CHIEF
Even so.

And the mounds, at the end of this hunting
Shall lift their heads no higher.
It is the way of our people.
It is the will of the Master of Life.

[The High Priest falls in a heap at the feet of the
Young Chief. The women come up bringing earth,
which they cast over the body of the dead man. When
the women go down from the mound, the other figures
have disappeared and the top of the mound is empty.
The women take up their looms and household affairs
and go off. following the men. The dwellings of the
mound-builders disappear, and for a moment the stage
is clear.

Enter a group of Osage Indians. Some of them
carry poles, and set up tepees; others go oyer and in-
spect the mound, curiously; still others kindle fires,
while the cooks bring water from the lagoon, going
down at the extreme right of the stage. The center is
occupied by a group of Indian children, who start



games in front of the wigwams, shouting lustily at their
play; they ai-e scattered for a moment by the passing
of a medicine nmn ; some of them follow and mock him,
and all resume their play whvu he has gone into the
lodge.

Enter a party of hunters, returning from the chase
with rabbits, wild fowl, and deer. Tiie cooks immedi-
ately set about preparing the feast.

Two runners enter from the right, going to the
tepee of the chief. Trumpets are heard, and tiie In-
dians troop to the back of the stage. Enter, from the
right, De ISoto and his command; they come ou above
the mouud, and swing down toward the audience, cen-
ter, the chiefs going up to meet them, the women and
children running away. De Soto gives to the chiefs
presents of colored cloth, etc.

He then holds up to them certain objects of gold and
silver, at w^hich the Indians show great curiosity. He
inquires by gesture whether they have such metals.
They shake their heads; De Soto and his ofiticers show
grave disappointment.

One of the Spanish captains comes forward and be-
seeches the commander to give up the search and turn
back. He pauses, and the}" draw away from him ; he
bows his head, deciding to give up the expedition and
return. He calls out the priests and carpenters, and
commands that a cross be set upon the mound ; this is
immediately done, the priests stand by the cross, and a
litany is sung, the soldiers responding and the Indians
standing with upraised arms. De Soto mounts his
horse and orders his army to march ; they pass around
the mound and off to the right. The Indians return to
their tepees.

As soon as the Spaniards are gone, the chiefs antl
medicine men call all the people of the village, beating
drums and shouting. The Calumet Dance is begun,
proceeds for a time, and is interrupted by warning
shouts from the mound, where watchers are stationed.
A messenger enters from the left, and delivers to the
chief of the village a red war-belt. The dancers scat-
ter. "War whoops are heard from the right of the stage,
and a smoking arrow falls and stands upright in the
center. The chief calls to his warriors, and they rush
forward, armed with bows and axes, and begin the War
Dance, which is interrupted by the appearance of the
14



enemy. The men of the village discharge their arrows
against their foes, and then rnsh upon them as they
appear in full view. The people of tlie village are
driven back, almost to their tepees, when the medicine
men lead a group over the mound and into the midst
of the invaders, who take fright and are driven back.
The tribes-men pursue them out of sight, and then fall
back for council.

Enter a deputation of the enemy, bearing aloft a
Calumet and white peace-belts. The Indians sit in coun-
cil, the Sachem of the village speaking first.]

SACHEM
You came with bows and axes. The roads were
closed. Now you come with the wiiite peace-belt
and the Calumet. You ask us to open the roads.
We are not childreii. No.

CALUMET BEARER

[Chief of the deputation from the enemy.]
We came with arrows because your braves have
hunted in our lands.

SACHEM
All lands are our hunting grounds. The Giver of
Light has made for the Osage all the hills and the
forests and the rivers, so far as his feet may tread.

CALUMET BEARER
Yet our people must have food, or they die. If you
will not open the roads, we will burn up your tribes
with the fire of our angei-.

[He lifts the peace-belt to throw it down.]

MEDICINE MAN
[Coming between them.]
I have heard your speaking. I have slept and the
Manitou has made for me a dream. Far to the
snow and the setting sun there is good hunting.
Far toward the summer and the flowing of the
river is good hunting. Let us open the roads, but
let us divide the lands.



CALU.AIKT li 10 A HER
Is tliis li-iic t;ilk lliis dream fi'din tlic ^ranitoii?

MEDICINE MAX
It is true talk.

CALUMET BEARER
Will yon stay hero, or go on to the snow and the snn-
set, that the roads may be open?

SACHEM

AVe will stay here with onr green growing corn.

CALUMET BEARER
We will not open the roads —

MEDICINE MAN

Let the Giver of Light speak to us. I will cast mine

axe, and the Manitou will make it fall as he wills.

[The others nod, and the Sachem whitens one side of

the axe ; the Calumet Bearer marks the other side with

crimson ; the Medicine Man tosses it high in air ; all

watch its flight. The men of the villasre nod and grnnt

their approval of the result.]

CALUMET BEARER

We will go on to another hnnting ground. Let the

roads be open.

[He putfs the Calumet and passes it to the circle;
the peace-belts are exchanged, and the Calumet Bearer
leads his people sadly away. For a moment the council
smokes in silence. Then a boy runs in and stands be-
fore the Sachem.]

SACHEM
Speak, young runner with face against the south
wind.

THE BOY

Canoes, on the great river. Two canoes. Pale faces
— seven pale face men. Their paddles dip in the
stream. They are Manitous.

16



SACHEM
I have heard of these pale faces.

THE BOY
One of them is a Black Gown.

SACHEM

From the northern country comes word in the
spring; to the Black Gown all roads are open.

[The Sachem comes down to the water's edge, and
the people of the village crowd around him, waiting
and watching.

Marquette and Jolliet enter in canoes, Marquette
coming first ; he speaks with the Sachem, and then, over
his shoulder, to Jolliet.]

MAKQUETTE
I am welcome?

SACHEM

I thank thee, Black Gown, and thee. Frenchman, for
the labor of yonr coming. Never shone the sun so
tenderly as to-day; never rustled the corn so pleas-
antly as now, since yon are with us. Our river,
which was so angry at the rocks that chafed it,
flows calm and silent, since the canoes of the white
men have passed. Black Gown, thou art beloved
of the Great Spirit. Ask him to cherish me and my
people.

MARQUETTE
>ry pi-ayers shall be said for your people.

SACHEM

We have heard from the north of the greatness of
the Manitou. ^fake thy dwelling with us, that we
may learn to know him.

17



MARQUETTE

[To Jolliet.]

They are eager for the teachings of the Cross. Shall
we not remain?

JOLLIET

We may not stay, father. The journey is long be-
fore us.

MARQUETTE

God be with you and bless you, my children. I will
return, I will bring you my faith — I and my
brothers. But now we must go on. Farewell.



SACHEM

Farewell to thee. Black Gown.

[The canoes move on, the eyes of the Indians follow-
ing them. As they pass from sight the Sachem steps
closer to the shore ; then he folds his arras, and the peo-
ple go back to the tepees, slowly, leaving the Sachem
alone. He stands for a moment, then follows the others,
and disappears inside his tepee.

Enter a new group of Indians, laden with furs ; some
of them lead horses bearing packs.

Enter, in canoes, La Salle and his party ; there are
fifty-four in all, Frenchmen and Indians. They dis-
embark, a number, however, remaining with the canoes.
Some of them bargain with the Indians, buying the
furs and taking them to the canoes. La Salle walks
apart with Tonty. A group of the Frenchmen ap-
proach La Salle, their hats in their hands. A Voy-
ageur speaks for the group.]

VOYAGEUR

We are come to ask, does the Sieur de la Salle intend
to go further down the river?

LA SALLE
He does.

18



VOYAGEUR
The river is filled with dangers. No Frenchman has
lived to follow it to its end. There is a great
water-fall —

LA SALLE
I have heard these tales before.

VOYAGEUR
The trade is good here, and to the northward.

LA SALLE
We go on, to the South.

VOYAGEUR

The Sienr de la Salle speaks for himself. We are

afraid.

LA SALLE

You have nothing to fear, save my anger.

[Others have gathered behind the Voyageur; their
demeanor at this becomes more openly rebellious.]

VOYAGEUR

It is not just. We must look to our own lives. ^^ e
dare not go on.

LA SALLE

Do I not command here?

TONTY

No man may question the authority of the Sieur de
la Salle.

LA SALLE

You ask me to turn back. You are afraid. The
wealth of these rivers is ours for the taking. These
lands are ours for the claiming. For this I have
waited, and planned, and fought. Do you think 1
will turn back because my boatmen are afraid?

19



VOVAUEUR
Our lives are our own. We will not go on.

[La Salle turns and faces them, drawing his sword.]

LA SALLE

Frenclimeu, our lives are in the service of the King.
We go on a voyage of glory, to claim for liim this
river and all its tributaries, to win for him an em-
pire. I will not turn back, now nor hereafter. I
will follow this river to the sea — not for myself,
not for you who go with me, but for France. Long
live the King !

TONTY AND OTHERS
[Who have gathered behind him.]
Long live the King !



LA SALLE



Forward !



[The Voyageur and his followers face La Salle for a
moment, then their heads drop, and thej^ take up their
packs and return to the canoes. La Salle going last ; the
canoes move on and disappear at the i-ight of the stage.]




20



THE PROPHET

[Appearing before the Medicine Lodge at the right
of the stage, high up against the great tree-trunk. It
is now sunset.]

Great Manitou, whose camp-fire now l)uriis low,
Hark to luy speaking. Call tliy children home,
And paint their faces with thine onward fire,
And lead them down the war trail to thy rest.
For lo, the smokes of all our villages
Blow westward, and the hungry snows fall deep
Upon our hunting grounds. And green Mondamin
He of the corn-gift, loves us now no more.
The Black Gown held his calumet aloft,
jVnd we knelt down. We loved him well. He passed.
And in the end his magic too passed on.
For strong pale men with thunders in their hands
Came after him. Their eyes were filled with dreams
Of rich far places we had never found,
Beyond the blue horizons. They were brave.
They shouldered us aside, and made new trails
And all the manitous of hill and cloud
Crouched to their spells, and breathed their med-
icine.
Great Manitou,

Thy vision flames wdthin me, and I see
Into the west our nations trooping slow.
And here our council places desolate.
The paleface rears in stone his mighty lodge
And sets his town upon the crossing trails.
His totem changes, but as beavers build
To stand against the floods of spring, so ho
Makes stronger with each year his thunder-house.
And I, Manitou, I set my face
To thine, and follow thee, into the night.

[The Prophet disappears.]
21




SECOND MOVEMENT

[A boat appears at the right, towed by men with eor-
delles. Youug Auguste Chouteau stands in the prow.]

CHOUTEAU

This is the place, men. Make fast.
[They make fast the ropes.]

A BOATMAN
What place, Monsieur Chouteau?

CHOUTEAU
The place where Monsieur Laclede blazed the trees.
Here we are to take the goods ashore.

[The crew at once sets to work to unload the boat,
Chouteau directing them. As the packs are landed, the
men set up canvas and board shelters over them ; this
work progresses as the dialogue is spoken.

TAILLON
[Coming up to Chouteau.]
Monsieur Auguste.

CHOUTEAU
What is it, Taillon?

TAILLON
Monsieur Laclede has sent us here. He has told us
to take from you his commands. We do so. You
came with him before. We wish to ask what is to
be done here. Is it here Monsieur Laclede will
have his settlement?

00



CHOUTEAU
Yes.

TAILLON
And build his house?

CHOUTEAU
Yes.

TAILLON
And why in this place?

CHOUTEAU

He has examined all the land from Fort Chartres
to the Missouri. Ste. Genevieve will not do. It is
too far from the Missouri, and there is no place to
store the goods.

TAILLON

But here is no place to store the goods.

CHOUTEAU

Monsieur Laclede said to me, "Auguste, go to the
place where I blazed the trees. Clear the ground.
Build a large shed for the goods, and cabins for
the voyageurs. I give you two men you can trust,
who will help you very much. I will come soon."
That is what he told me. Taillon, you are one of
those two.

TAILLON

^fy respects. Monsieur Chouteau. We will do as you
command.

[lie turns to the work, and they raise the side of a
large shed ; Chouteau watches them for a moment, look-
ing down stream expectantly. 1

CHOUTEAU
Ah, Taillon — Monsieur Laclede comes !

[Taillon joins Chouteau ; Laclede appears in a canoe,
two voyageurs paddling.]

2.S



TAILLOX

Monsieur Laclede comes !

[The men crowd back oi Chouteau and Taillon as
Laclede lands; they doff their hats and bow.]

CHOUTEAU

You are most welcome, sir.

LACLEDE

[Looking at the sheds and work done.]
Well done, my lad. Taillon, the work moves. My
friends, in a little while the English will come to
take the land across the river. You are all loyal
subjects of France. I have chosen this place that
you may still be her subjects, in the hope that our
village may become considerable hereafter.
[A general murmur of applause from the men.]
You come here willingly, gladly?

[General assent.]
I pledge you what I have, and the good will of our
companj^ for your prosperity. Taillon, Marche-
teau, Kierceraux, Deschamps — what will you
choose to do in our village?

TAILLON

Monsieur Laclede, they are all for trading with tlu-
Indians, and growing rich.


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