Timothy Flint.

A condensed geography and history of the western states, or the Mississippi valley online

. (page 47 of 85)
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oais, Indian com, ali.^e fitiits <^ the United States, with
the exception of orai^es and figs, gnm kxuriaBlly here^
-In East Tennessee, consideraUe attention is paid to raising
catde and horses, which are tlriT^i over ihe mountaiiis to
the Atlantic country for sate. In 1830, the number ni pw^-
sons employed in agriculture was 109,910; and in manu-
Pictures 7,860. The amount of articles mami&ctured was
estimated at between four and five millions of doUais/—
The principal articles were iron, hraap^ cotton and cor*
dage. The exports have hitherto been by the way of New
Orleans. Some olf the articles of the growth of this state
are sent to the head waters of the Ohio, and recently some
have been wagoned across the ridges to the waters of the
Alabama, and have found their way to the gulf by Mobile.
Neall|r one thousand persons are employed in conducting
the commerce of the state.

Chief Towns. Murfreesborough is the political me-
tropolis of the state. * It is situated on Stone^s river, thir-
ty-two miles soutb-e^t from Nashville; it contains about
fourteen hundred inhalritants; is central to the two great
divisions of the state, and is surrounded by a deU^tM and
thriving country.

Nashville is the commerdal capital of th^ state, and by
fiir the largest town in it It is very [rfeasandy situated on
the south diore of the Cumberland, adjacent to h^ and
fine Uuffi. Steam boats can ordinarily ascend to this
place, as long as they can descmid fitmi fine mouth oft die
Cumberiand te that of the Ohio. It is a place, that imUl
be ^ften visited, as a resort for the peof^e of the lower
country, during the sultry montfis. Scarcely any town in
he western country has recently advanced with more rapid
strides. It has a ovmber of handisome jmvate mansi^NiBi



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aad reqiecteUe poUic baiMifigs. 'Ehe sefeml ekiyeo)^ of
pttfBuit are followed bece. with industry andspirit. It m^
the seat ci a ooIIm;^, wliicb ha»a respeolable cfaymioal and
phifofic^iluGal a^Pll^ and liturary, and a ruaiiig repvta*
tioa It is €6ttfliaiad to eomain at present, rbiBg of ^
IhoMand inhahimnts;^ and k, 9Aef New Orleans, Cincifi-
naii, and Pittsburgh the next lacgest town in the western
eountry.

Knoxiflfo^the dueftown.c^East Tennessee, is silttated
on Hekten river, four milesbelow its junction with French
Broad. It is supposed to contain 3^060 inhal^tants; has
eooBidefable manuAM^toies, a i«i^)e(Ab)e seminary of
leaming, and is a pleasuit woA thriving pkee.

The following are consideiaUe villages, containing from
SOOto 1,90ft iidiabitanta Bloamsville, Rogersville, and*
Radedge cm Holslon river. XBzewell, Grantsborough and
itt^pton, on Clinch river; Jonesbwongh, Gre^iville,
Newport, Dandridge,. Sevi^viBe on Fr^M^h Broad and
its waters; MaffFiville, Washington^ Pikeville, Madis<Mi,
Winchester, FayetteviUe,. PiihuAi, Shelbyville^ Golumt»a,
Ytnon and Reynoldsburg on the Tennesseo and its wa-
ters. Montgomery, Momtie^Spana^ Carthage, GaHaiin,>
Lebanon^ M'MinnvillevJefieraon, Franklin, Haysborough,
Charlotte, Springfield, Clarksville on the Cumberland and
its wat^PEf.

Memphis, nearly on the line between thi^state and Mis^
siffippi, as wehaveafaready rmnarbsd, occupies the iNte of
fort Pickering. It stands on one of die noblest UnfiB d'tbe
Mississippi, proudly elevatsd above that river^ and its
fine of^KMito beilsms. A beautifol railing oountry sur-
founds it in the rear. A remnant of ^ tribe of the
Chiekasaws resides near it The inhabitanis of this vil-
bge used to be chieAy of mixed blood. Sinee it has ta*
km sttc^ an imposing name, the torn has made consider^*



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the apperand the lammeomMjjWaAAmBf'm hmu§ the
pom of general tmftraa Stmet Trinnnnrium the iflHt re-
giow on the Afkanaaa, Wnlutii and iigMiver,^ifoi6iM»
benodoabtytbatk wiltultimalely beoosiea coarideraMa
phK^. It is ene of the pbeee on the Mianaappiv mkith
pasmig stean beala gmt^miy honm^ mtt the diaskaiga^
ci their cannon, as they ascend die river by it

Natmral CmrwaUk^ Tikis fiwU aa8% 8i««ii«a a ao-
{MOOS artieia. We have abeady loaclRd ea. tha aangalar
configoralUNiof the Kma intwwi oubiitwita of d»s coMMry^
from vfbkk it resuhs diat there aw aambpApM a atca s iia
cavities in the eardi Some have sappased^ dsNii diasa^faat*
lows are aslended ander the greater part ^tf* diOflorfiiMof
the cooniiy. firings and even eanmtBcaUa 8^reaiii» of
wirter §&m'm dwro^andhaw subtenaacaMocaaiBea Gaiaa
have been expfovedalgieat depfdis-fiMr an catent 0$HH$
milQB. They aheuad in siagakr ehaaAbaia^ pmdiginiai
vaahedapartniaita^aodmanyof theairvvhta^ fi^ ilfai*
naaalad vvith die teaohes of- die viaitaBis, hwe a^gineaay
grandeur^ whiehao^asenptfaneaaldiaaGh.. Tte^jiita
of aaimab, aad ia soaie^ine|Mtoea faunaAshBrieloasha^a!
been foand ia thara* The wrlh of these caves is gotftd i
ly iBipregnaladsatHigly wiih BiHMo of fime, Aom wfaicb
any quanti^ of gun-{x>wder might be made.

On some vpuma of die Cuflib«rland moantaios, calfed.
die eaehanled auauttainv are aMurked iBdia solid Ihaar
•tone £MMopa af asearli>>'9cs, and other aniands^a^
asdKMigh^ fMomfy mado^ and aa distinct, as thoQ^M»-
preased'opaD cfa^ aH>ftan The micha oAsa i ndioat e, that
tk» feet, vddch made thcat^had sliddea, aa w<mld be die
ease in descmdiiigdacdivilits in soft ch^. They ara pte^
eisi% of thesamedasB .widi diekapress el two hommit
feet fiwnd iaa Uoek af sohd haMstoaot qimrrieckoat^ dia*



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awfitt^iie Mmmijpfj^. Tke naamei^mk mhkh they

TenneaBce isttlMHidam m petriiieticiM miA ofganic re-
vmuA NetrtbeMMhem fao^dbry of tlM state aietiwe^
tmm cMtely petrified One is a eyprees^ feur feet in di-
ime i et. l^e cuber isasyeamore anilllieiiw4 ka hick-
or}<L -Tkey iyi eiii * i o ug ht to It^t i^ the feUuigin of the
sarnhbaiA. of tbeTcnnesMa A mstof eggmi the wildi
tsfliey wMfe-dug i^iaa siaie^if petv^ctkia Pmnbgmif;
^\m, tMib, »d oiheff faOBta of antmak are foaml near
tlKMHdiRea A teothwaerec^itfym tbeposscflnmiof Jer-
oMWih BrtwHyEsq^ wbicfa jut^eKbywoodaffiraia, meas-
vmi anamker of feet hi leiigtht&iMl at the iosertioAof the
jirvr was eight Hiehes bread. At a sri p hu riyrag, twelve
.mi^from BeynoMsbiug, im» fewod a tusk of saeb enor-
iaiwiliaiei!iiioiis,4»thathkM])pe^ fvom one

ti^two handm) povMb. Itis shmtng, yellow^ and perfect-
ly rei^0 the wi&itA co^rmaiiim^ Near it were found
oriMrboBes^pplMitohdongtQthesaiBefaugeaniinaL It
iscafealRied irifibtiieiippearaiieeand siaeofthe boncb^thai
dM«nnttiywhenIi«»iag^Kiliii(httfebee& twenty feet high.
IiagB anik eoftl^botb pit and charcoal are oftm dug up in
iMiiiriaie^tibplhs^m BiKty to^€>ne handred feet below tfae^
9Mrftte€^. ing^ i^asee^ and idols of ndoulded clay have
heoa fomod in so many places^ w> haxdly to be deemed cu*
lioflkiea Walis of fe«ed stone^ and eve» walled wells
lMv#beea feend in so many piaoes^and under mieh cir*
oQrnitaneM) and at soiahdefiifas^ as to pi^^ of

li^Mr living been done by the whites of the present day,
eribe p m mj ft m ewiamm. In tMs Grtale as well as in Miaaou-
riv bwyiiif gramcb ha?re beett feiind» where die skelecons
aettn €dl to fas^i^ been pigniies. Even the |^ve»in which
dwbecfieB were deposited, are seldom more dnui two feet,
eriiwfc^qyiiialMtfatlQiigidii^ To oblate the ot^ection^



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l4 TENNESSEE;

that these are all bodies of children, it k affirmed tiiae>
these skulls are found to possess the dentes sapmUkty^
and must have belonged to persons of mature age.

There are a great many beautiful easeades in Teimes-^
see. One of the most striking is that, known by the name
of the ^falling water.^ The cascade is eight miles above
its junction with the Caney fork, and iteariy fifiy mile»
from Carthage. For some distance above, the rivw is a
continual cataract, having fidlen, in a little distance, 150
feet The ^ fit! V or peipendiealar leap, is 960 feet, or as
some measure it, ISO feet. The vi^th of the sheet is^
eighty feet, and the noise is deafening. Tdylor's creek
fall is somewhat greater than this. It is differently estinia^
ted from 200 to 350feet. The desert to the foot of die
rock is difficult and dangerous; but the grandeur of die
spectacle richly compensates the hazard. The q>ectaiCNr
finds himself almost shut out from the view of the sky, 1^
an overhanging diff, between 300 and 400 feet high.^ —
The stream before him, falling from the last rock in sbeettr
of foam, almost deafens him with the noisa A considera-
ble breeze is created by the M\\ and the m«t is diriv^i
from the felling spray, like raia Twenty yards below dHS,
on the south side, is the most beautifel cascade, of which
the imagination can conceive. A creek, six or eight feet
wide, falls from the summit of an overhanging rock, a dis-*
tance of at least 300 feet The water, in its descent, is
divided into a thousand litde streams, which are a^gm.
driven by the wind, in lowers of rain, for a number of
yards distance.

Much discussion has enraed, and much useless learn-
ing been thrown away, touching some silver and copper
coins, found some years eance, at a litde distance below the
surfece, near Fayetteville, in this state. One of the mhet
coins purports to be of Antoninus and the other of Coid-



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WDiiiriL ^HiewrA underwhifh the oo^fer coins were
feoad, WW covered with trees, which eould not be less
than 400 years old. There can be no doubt, that such
coins were found ; mi d^re seems some difficult, in »ip-
posing them to have been depoeated, merely to play upon
Ae creduli^ of some virtuoso. But, as such deceptions
hiKve been known to be practiced, in some instances, we
«ffin* jt as a possible sdution of the difficulty of their be-
ing found there.

The paintings, that are found on some high, and appa-
veatly inaccessible rocks, in this state, have been mention**
«d 99 cunMities, ever since it has been vi^fiied by^hite
aen. The figures are of the sun, moon, animals and ser-
pents; and are out of question the worii of former races
of mea The colors are presented as fi-esh as though re-
oeatly done,and the delineations in some instances are viv-
id ai^ ingenioua « ^

A carious appearance, so ccmuncMi to the people of die
4XHintry, as no l|»ger to strike them with w^Hider, is the
mmensdy de^ channels^ in which many of the streams
^ this coantcy rua Descending many of them, that are
lai^ge^MNigh to be bqatable, the astonished voyager looks
4B|i,and sees himself borne along a river running at the
hose of perpendicular lime stonewalls, sometimes three
•r four huBMdred feet high. The view is still more grand
and surprising, when- the spectator looks down from
^JbK^e; and sees the dai^ waters rolling at such prodigious
depths^ below him, in a regular excavation, that seems to
hme been hewn from the solid lime stone, on purpose to
feeeive the river.

Cematibtthn. Thb has no essential difference of fea-
ttre firoBd that of the other western states. In the l^isla-
4are the number of representatives he^ a given propor-
^i<m t# the nuwb^ir of twaU^ iijibabitants^ and 4iQ number



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of «e»fttoi» uniiltMver iie jw^re &a»YMwMi^ « leiiihiMi
one third cf the mimber of wepreaexmiiims. To be dig»«
ble,a»aiemberaof eithm'faoHei^lliepMVDiiaMKtlMMfe aso»
sided three jvare in ibestale, md oae in ilie eown y ^ «m1
bepesseasedof 200aete8of bad. The ywyne riB dteo*
led for two yeare; and is eligible six yeais eot tof e^lit
He most be tweDty*fi?e years of age; omM; iia?e rfeaMed
i&Ae state fow years* and must f wn e ac 5§§ acffea of 1»M^
to be eligible to that office. - The judiciary m
to ooupts of law and ei^ty« The
judges, k» -hold their offiee dunng good bekovmir. AN
free men twenty;«one yeorsof age, and ^o fam^ tettded
in the county six months preeeding tbo efafctjen, poowi
the electire franchise.

Sd$o^. There are Ane iniitmiom im the ^iati^
which bear ^ name of o^legesf one at Nashville^ one
at>Knoxi4i^ and one at Marysville. Tile OmJMttad
ppesbyterians are maidng ^eateffims torear a 4ieological
insdtution^in which to train young men for their wo i ohi| ^
The college at Na^Tille has been amply mdoweil, and
tmder a learned pre8ideil^gi<re8 promise of ykUUng aMpk
okl to the literature of the state. AcsffdemiesaMleoniaHMi
ec^ools ai^ inc»^ashig, imd die people seem to be u d wfc ei^'
ing to a sense of the impor^eeof edocMion to the pMh
^rvadon of our repuMioatt institutions. ''

History. As Tennessee is oneof the(dd4M aiMl most
important (tf ihe western states, it seems tight, liMtiM
should enter witfi someAmg pHHreof panitolArily imo ikt
events of its first setdementand pn^iress. She has aheady
swarmed her tens of thousands of em i g r ai H B imo the
newer states and terrifories; and especially iMoIHiimstnd
Missouri. Aldioogh in fiu^ but df yeg^nky heiMtf, rile
claims jn-ecedenceClkmoi^ibese younger m^fibers of thte
confederacy, as a common mollis. The territortalfimitt



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Wvrem dw slMeand Ynj^Mft were settled by eommiBt-
Monersircimeacli state ia 1803. DufNttes existed between
ikts state mad Kentndiy, roqieotiiig tbe estem of -tbe state
ttm^ wlueh were hajl^ly adjoeted in 18S0, ind^n bsr lim-
ite weie ^xed, as diey ara gi vea at die bead 4yf ewr aeoount
^ thisslata

In 1990, tbisfine contry waaall a vast fbrart. From
vafious oaoaes it.bad bem kmg deserted by ike Lodiaiia;
and in tbe iartBe boMoms and grassy barrens, game left to
increase unmolested, had become abundant To himt in
tbisunooonpiedandbeant^countiyliad become a lucra^
tive bnsinesSi Many of the first settles mwe drawn hare
to {MUisue thisot]9eot . Tbe andent maps of die western
country enable us to judge of the stnation of places at
tbe time that Franee claimed the whole oomilry south of
Canada, belwera the Misiriasqipi and the All^^iany moun-
laina F;rench £om are M|M«sented <m these maps, as
standing, one at the mouth of the Kentucky ri¥er; one on
die sottdi bank of tbe Ohio; another on the nordi side of
the Qhio,atthe mouth of the WidMish; one near the junc-
tmnof the Ohio with tbe MiBsisnippi? one at the Chicka-
saw \Mb; one on the east bank of Red xi?er; and one at
diie jun^onof theCoosa and the Tallapoosa, called Ala-
bama, after the name i^ the rivei; On the head waters <^
the Tombeckbee,diey bad, also, a Ibrt called noulause.
Five leagues up theTwnessee dMiyliad anothw* One,
{otuatedat the moudi of theKeabawa, was called Shawnea
Oaa»|iot a great way above the mouth of thelUinois, was
called Crme Coeur; one, half way up the Illinois ismaric-
ed by the name French Fort, and one on the north-west-
ern extremity of lake Mich^yia This vras part of diat
&moua plan 4^ posts, and ccmnected lines of defences by
which it was tbe French policy tobokl this vast and fertile
oountry in subjepdon. In 1765, the Cherokees, at diat

VOL. IL 3



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tifkie a powerfiil tribe^ w^^n aUiaiioe mik die FfMcb,
and of comm hostile to the English. In 1756, n matf
Tvastnade, boih with them and the Catewbes, on the cmmU -
tion that we sboald build a fiirtki thetoantiy of each tribe;
and the motive alleged was, diat they were Ah- the de-
fence of the women and children, when they were absent
on their ekpeditimifii. With this view fbrt Loodoti wo! built
fordiem,inl7d7. AgarriMiiwaaiihcediti thiafifft;aiidliie
Indiam oflfered bountieBof land,toittdneeartkEami tocome^
and settle in the vicituty. The remembraMtof a thrie
y^ears^ war was not immediately erased i and the CSiero^
kees still manifested such symptonn q^ hostility, dial colo-
nel Bird was sent among them. He bink «mK garrsmied
two forts, one of them on the river Holsien, opposite ibe
upper emd t^ Long iriand, in Whieh forts his aymy vmMe^
ed, in 17fl8^ Theforton the Ui^ston was beauiifiilly sittt-
ated. At this time there was notanotfaer white settleoseat
on that river. Batafter die building of the fort, the r^
ports, whidi were circulated, of die fartilky of the sail,
and the abundaoieec^ game, led some persons to settle be*
iween diem, before the brealdng out<^ the Qieiokee waor^
which omimencedin iKSSk The cii^cumstanoe wbidkgave
rise tothis war, was die taking soMe horses by the Indi^
ans, which belonged to the new white settlers; to re^aee
diose which dbe savages had lost, during the preoediag
war widi FVance, in which ihey had joined us. The
while settlers se»ed their tKHnsesa^n; mi dther killed,
or made priscmers of die warriors, that had taken the
famsea Thus was opened avast field for the exercise of
diose lerrible acts of feroeity,^ which savages are so la^
mous. The ftonii^v of Virgieia and Mordi CaroKaa were
terribly ravaged widi die flames and the tseraahftwk, as
^ cwtomary in such oases.



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FbrtLomloiiwis sitaati^ on the noith std# of Iittl«
Teimeflsee, a mik above the moudi of TeUieo,iii the een*
tra ef the Qierdcee country. It had a jnoaU-gamsoii-^
Hiebidiaiis beeleged it; aad^ie garriaon was compelled
toflttft^nderfor wmt<if pioTaaowiL They were to be al*
lowed (o retreat to the white aeldeaieiits, beyond the Blue
rid^. AM of them, but aioe, SM by indimriminaie mas-
aacre. Between Iwo and three hundred men^ woo^n
and childrm were triauL This event, so mmoorablein the
first setdeneRt ef Temessee, took place in 1760. —
in IWI9 eoioMl Grant led a strong fovce into their
coMift f y aMd eo«peifed ibean to aue for peaee. A
tpeaty was the result Inconseqaoieeof this war^theonr
tysetdement, wfakh had been BHole in the vicinity of fo^
Laadan^ vms desarled. The treaty renewed the confi-
deaoaof the inuBigrants fima Pennsylvania and Tirginia,
who had deswtedlba coantry. They^and othi^^ asBocia-
dug with them, retoniedio tfaecountry, with the purpose of
renewing th^r projeetsof hmttingand asttleMmat They
settled in EaM TenMSsea Tiieae a^en gave diose names
to the chief mountains and rivers, i^ich have been retain-
ed siaee that time. The names ^ Cumberland and Laurel'
were given by them in afisctienate rraoembrance of their
native nuMmtains. The masscf banters and adventurers
ecmthmed to advance, step l^scep^ and broaden their cur-
de, setting Ae examf^ of Amencaarsettlevsin the wilder-
ness, in aU uabsuquent periods They soen penetrated the
htferiw, of what is now called Eaal Tennessee.

In ITMf Dotoiel Bocme, tfaepatiiuch of seidements in
die western fiM i c a ts, auuiean eRsenrsien fifom North C2aro*
hnawlothe wo6d»ofTmneasee. in 1706v^colond Smid^
with eoflse friends, traviepsed a great pertiott of WestTen-
nessee. They descended to die movob of Tennessee and
Cumberland, rivers, on atrip of discovery. They saw



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99 TENKUBSSB^

novdinie peoplein these regions, hk 1768^811 easfhnng:
party came into this coiuitiy from Virginia. Th^ spent
some months, trayeraing it in all directiona But tb^
found (Ml their retnra^ that the country, whi<^ had 00 re-'
cently be^i a wide wild^ness,^ was no longer so. Most of
the fertile spots,^ in eKgiUo situaiionsy had hem ocqppied.
The firet permanent settlements were made in East Tw-
nessee, in the winters of 17€6,. Mid 1769. The setdam
came from Virginia and North Cardina. At this time
Daniel Boone joined them. The settl^nents e^ilffiiied to
increase, until 1774, and 1775, when an ^densiveiHir-
chase of land from the Indians was made by a company.
There was among these setttors the usual mixture of rss-
pectableand trifling people; and Aey wete ioqpettedlo
form theseneweslablkihnMits by the usual mixture^ mo*
tives. But even those despamtediaraoters, that had fled
from debt and the laws, were of use here;^ fbf ifaay station-
ed themseliFes on the frontier of tUs vemote and ui^irotec-
ted settlement, and became a barrier b^ween it and the
savagesr The habitants who had fiaeed themsefoesnear-
est the hmtls of Vii^nia, placed themselves imdor the
govemm^it of that state; and those that wi^^e noWMtta
Carolina, threw themselves under die jmitecdcm of its
laws. But the trouUes, which were justcommimcing m
the Adantic country, prevailed the par^Eit regitm from
being able to extrad eflkient protection to these re*
mote and feeUe estabUshmenls in the wildamess. In 1774,
the Shawnees, and other confedemtod Im&uis from the
north <^ the Ohio,, made on eoQBursion into that part i^ dns
country,whi<^ is no w catted SuUivMaoouB^. Tbqrw^ne
met by the peofAs of the country, aided by a few regufaur
troops, and were attacked with a spirit, wbkdi had the e&
feet to put a stop to their incunnons, until 1776, The pur-
chase whiahhas been miientioned above, was not agreeaUoi



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TENKCMSE. 21

toall iie Indiaii^ It was particularly disagreeable to a
chief amcHig diem, called Occannostata. He made a
?eryabimated speech against it It was not, however,
heeded by die Indians.

In 1776, (he Indians of diese remote regions began to
Sbd the eflfects of the revolutionary troubles in the Atlantic
country; and commenced tfieir customary depredations.
The people of Virginia and North Carolina sent such
troops, asdiey could spare, who were aided by the people.
Tliis force exercised vigilance and unanimity ; and in some
eases Anticipated the attacks of the Indians. . At this time
it was, diat the united settlements sent delegates to the
conventi<m diat established the district of Washingtoa —
The name of captain John Sevier is one, that occurs of-
ten in the early history of this state. In 1774, he had held
the commission of captsun under earl Dunmore, governor
of Vii^nia ; and in 1777, governor Caswell, of North Car-
olina, gave him the commission of lieutenant colonel of
the Washington regiment of militia under colonel Carter.
A batdewas fought, in June 1776, between the force of the
inhabitants united with the soldiers from Virginia, and the
savages, at a place called Long-island Flats, which was a
gr^tt advantage to the settlers; not only because victory
declared iti thehr favour, without the loss of one man ; but
as it gave them confidence in themselves, in demonstrating,
that Aey were able to compete with the savages ; and by
showing to the hostile Oierokees what they might expect^
in the issue cf a bottfe, if tfaey continued to practice their
hostilities^

Notwithstanding this lesson, the Cherokees not only con-
tinued to manifest a hostile sjuirit, but assaulted the forts;
and murdered every person, who Was so imprudent, or so
unfortunate, as to be found alone. Aroused by the story
of bumii^aild murder firqm these infant settlements, Vir-



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iiti TKMHiaiSBS.

ginia, notwithstanding her pressure at home, ordered col^
onel Christian, with a respectable force, to march into the
heart of the Cherokee settiements. His foree amomMed
to 1,800 men. They fomid no Indians, until they aniyed
at a town called Tamotlee. The Indians did not dare to
look this fim^ in the face; and sued for peace. It was
agreed, that the Indians shoi^ enter into a trea^ on the
May fdlomng. Until that time, it was stipulated, that hos-
tilities should cease on both sides, with the excq)tion of
two Indian towns, near which a prisoner had been burned.
This enormity had been practised uponayom^sonoflfr*
Moore, who had been captured on the Watauga. The
excepted towns were burned, and die army returned
to quarters. The Indians were awed ; but notwithstand-
ing their fears, and the promise of a treaty, they still dbow-
ed manifest intentions to inflict all the injury they couML

In 1777, an arrangement was brought about between the
states of North Carolina, Virginia and the Indiana A
definitive boundary was settled for the country, wJiidi 19
now called Tennessee. It was then supposed to beloi^
to those states. The Indians at this time professed to fete ui
treaty with us; but they frequently murdc^red the secdeM,
when they found them unprotected and alone. TUs y^aft
the district of Washington was made a county. Courts
were organized, and a land-c^ce opened, in wliieh
great quantities of land were entered. That tribe of the
Cherokees, that lived on die credc, called ddcamaugit
and that were called by that name, had always been hos*
die to the whites, and bad never entered heartily into die
treaties between the settlers and the Indiana By the addi-
tion of a number of hostile tribes on the Ohio, thcar num-
bers were increased to a thousand warriors. In ITW^
they began openly to attack the frontiers from Georgia to
Pennsylvania. A force was sent against them from North



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CwoUna and Virgiiiia This force came upon the Indi-



Online LibraryTimothy FlintA condensed geography and history of the western states, or the Mississippi valley → online text (page 47 of 85)