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R 5549

T4 ;

1755 ^

'opy 1 5 DE WITT'S ACTING PLAYS. <^^^

(Number 147.)



THE



OVERLAND ROUTE.




A COMEDY, IN THREE ACTS.



BY TOM TAYLOR,

AOTHOB OF " AN TOEQUAL MATCH," " CONTESTED ELECTION," "PLOT AND
PASSION," " HEAETS AND HANDS," " STILL WATEB BUNS DEEP.



AS FIRST rERFORMED AT THE THEATRE ROTAL HAYMAR-
KET, LONDON, APRIL, 1860.



TO \rilI>II JJ-T. ADDED

A description of the Costume— Cast of the Characters— Entrances and Exits-
Relative Positions of the Performers on the Stage, and
the whole of tlie Stage Business.




> > <»> < ^



4T: « la - 3 r It :
ROBERT M. DE WITT, PUBLISHER,
o> J\'o. 33 Rose Street.




r FIRST I/OVli. A Comedy. In One Act. By L. J. Hollenius. Price
iiOW I 15 Cents.
JtEADY. I THERE'S 1\0 SMOKE WITHOUT FIRE. A Comedietta. In
- One Act. By Thomas Picton. Price 1.5 Cents.




%^¥B,



4®=- These Plays will be sent to any address, postage paid, on receipt
of price, Fifteen Cents each.



PdsuslileR,

No. 33 Rose Street.



No,

1. Caste. Comedy. 3 Acts. By T. W. Robert-

son. 6 Male, 3 Female Characters.

2. Nobody's Child. Dramatic Play. 3 Acts.

By Watts Phillips, Esq. 18 Male, 2 Female
Characters.

3. SIOO.OOO. By H. J. Byron, 8 Male, 4 Fe-

male Character.s.
i. Daadelion's Dodg^es. Farce. I Act. By

T. J. Williams. 4 Male, 2 Female Characters.
6. IVilliam Xell ! "With a "Vengeance.

Burlesque. 2 Acts. By H. J. Byron. 8 Male,

2 Female Characters.

6. Six Months Xgo. Farce. 1 Act. By Felix

Dale. 2 Male, 1 Female Characters,

7. Maud's Peril. Drama. 4 Acts. By Watts

Phillips. 5 Male, 3 Female Characters.

8. Henry Dunbar. Diama. 4 Acts. By Tom

Taylor. 10 Male, 3 Female Characters,

9. A Fearful Tfragedy in the Se-ven

Dials. A Farcical Interlude. 1 Act. By
Charles Selbs'. 4 Male, 1 Female Characters.

10. The Snapping Turtles ; or. Matrimonial

Masqueradinj?. Duologue, 1 Act, By Johu B,
Buckstone, 1 Male, 1 Female Characters,

11. IVoodcock's Little Came. Comedy

Farce. 2 Acts, By Johu Maddison Morton,
4 Male, 4 Ffnialc Characters.

12. A 'Wido-.v *lunt. Comedy.

tereil trum his own coniedv ot
Friend.") By J. Stirling Coy]
Female Characteis,

13. Ruy Rlas. llomantic Dra



3 Acts. (Al-
Everybody's
. 4 Male, 4



4 Acts,
ench of Victor Hugo. 12 Male,
4 Female Characters.

14. Rio Thoroughfare. Drama. 5 Acts and

a Prologue. By Charles Dickens and Wilkie
Collins. i:j Slale, 6 Female Characters.

15. Milky "»Vhite, Domestic Drama. 2 Acts.

By 11. T. Craven. 4 Male, 2 Female Characters.

16. Dearer than Life. Serio-comie Drama. 2

Acts, By Henry J. Byron. 6 Male, 5 Female
Characters.

17. Kind to a Fault. Comedy. 2 Acts. By

William Brough. G Male, 4 Female Characters.

18. If I had a Thousand alTear. Farce.

1 Act. By John Maddison Morton. 4 Male, 3
Female Characters.

19. He's a Lunatic. Farce. 1 Act. By Felix

Dale, 3 Male, 2 Female Characters,

20. Daddy Gray. Serio-comic Drama, 3 Acts,

By Andrew Halliday. 8 Male, 4 Female
Characters.

21. Play. Comedy. 4 Acts. By T. W. Robert-

son. 7 Male, 3 Female Characters.

22. David Garrick. Comedy. 3 Acts. By

T. W. Robertson. 8 Male, 3 Female Charac-
ters.

23. The Petticoat Parliament. Extrava-

ganza. 1 Act. By Mark Lemou. 15 Male, 24
Female Characters.
2'', Cabman Ko. 93; or. Found in a Four
Wheeler. Farce, 1 Act. By T. J. Williams.
J Male, 2 Female Characters.



The Droken-Hearted Club. Comedietta.
By J. Stirling Coyne. 4 Male, S Female Char-
acters.

Society. Comedy. 3 Acts. By T. W. Rob-
ertson. 16 Male, 5 Female Characters.

Time and Tide. Drama. 3 Acts and a Pro-
logue. By Henry Leslie. 7 Male, 5 Female
Characters.

A Happy Pair. Comedietta, 1 Act, By
S. Theyre Smith. 1 Male, 1 Female Charac-
ters.

Turning the Tables. Farce. 1 Act. By
John Poole, Esq. 6 Male, 3 Female Characters.

The Goose v«-ith the Golden Fggs.
Farce. 1 Act, By Messrs, Mayhew and Ed-
wards, 6 Male, 3 Female Characters,
. Taming a Tiger. Farce, 1 Act, 1 Male
Characteis,

The Little Ilebel. Farce, 1 Act. By
J. Stirling Coi'ne. 4 Male, 3 Female Charats-
tcr.'i.'

One too Many for Him. Farce. 1 Act.
By T. J. Williams. 2 Male, 3 Female Char-
acters.
. Larkin's Lo-ve Letters. Farce. 1 Act.
By T. J. Williams. 3 Male, 2 Female Charac-
ters,

A Silent Woman, Farce, 1 Act. By
Thos. Hailes Lacey. 2 Male, 1 Female Charac-
ters.

Black Sheep. Drama. 3 Acts. By J, Pal-
grave Simpson and Edmund Yates. 7 Male, 5
Fenuile Characters. ^ '

A Silent Protector. Farce. 1 Act. By
T. J. Williams. 3 Male, 2 Female Cliaracters,

The Kightful Heir. Drama, 5 Acts. By
Lord Lytton, 10 Male, 2 Female Characters.

Master Jones' Birthday, Farce, 1 Act.
By John Maddison Morton, 4 Male, 2 E«,male
Characteis,

Atchi. Comedietta, 1 Act. By J. Maddison
Morton. 3 Male, 2 Female Characters.

Beautiful Forever. Farce. 1 Act. By
Frederick Hay. 2 Male, 2 Female Characters,

Time and the Hour. Drama. 6 Acts.
By J, Palgrave Simpson and Felix iJale. 7
Male, 3 Female Characters,

Sisterly Service. Comedietta. 1 Act.
By J. V. Wooler. 7 Male, 2 Female Characteis.

"War to the Knife. Comedy. 3 ^cts. By
Henry J. Byron. 5 Male, 4 Female Characters.

Our Domestics. Comedy-Fared. 2 Acts.
By Frederick Hay. S Male, 6 Female Char-
acters.
, Miriam's Crime. Drama. «> Acts. By

H. T. Ciaven. 5 Male, 2 female Characters.
, Easy Shaving. Farce. 1 Act. By P. C.
Burnand and Montague Williams. 5 Male, 2
Penmle CharactHrs.
, Little Annle'n Birthday. Farce. Rj
W. E. Suter. 2 Male, 4 Female C'.mractej'S.



THE OYERLAID ROUTE.



% €ami^^,



IN THEEE ACTS.



BY TOM TAYLOR

Author of "An Unequal Match," " Contested Election," " Plot and Passion," " Bearta
and Hands," " SUU Waters Run Deep," etc., etc.



AS riEST PERFOEMED AT THE THEATEE EOTAL, HAYMARKET,
LONDON, APEIL, 1860.



10 WHICH ABB ADDED,



A DESCRIPTION OP THE COSTUMES — CAST OF THE CHABACTEBS— KN-

TBANCES AND EXITS RELATIVE POSITIONS OF. THE PER-

FOBMEBS ON THE STAGE, AND THE WHOLE
OF THE STAGE BUSINESS.



NEW YORK:
ROBERT M. DE WITT, PTTBLISHER,

No. 33 Rose Street.

) O'



THE OTEELAND KOTJTE.



CAST OF 0HA,







Theatre Royal, Uaymarket,
London, April, 1860.
Mr. Colepepper (Commissioner of '>t:/''^ // /

Badgerypore District) .fi<M]jU\,.M.^LJu7....11lx. Clippendalb.

Major McTurk (in charge of In- ' n /^

(valids) t^A-5C»<v3.^^^iT*/..Mr. Kogeks.

Sir Solomon Fraser, K. C. B. (ex-



.Mr. CoMPTON.



.Mr. BtrcKSTONE.



resident at several Native -^ ^ ff /_^

Courts) cU.JiX,-e>f^XV.

Mr. liovibond (a Singapore Mer- o /^ ^

chant) /pMCy^XiMj^

Tom Dexter (an Adventurer) vW.<W«/;«Ky.-t-!^ Mr. Chakles Mathe-vits.

Captain Smart (of the P. and O. _^ • ^

« Steamer, Simoon) ^.^^^on^%<uULAi-i .

rirst Officer of theSi- -f (/ / n

:^.^^.tJ7ir7Z7CiM^...;/i*lTi

^ /



CMr. Worrell.



. . .Mr. E. YiLLiEKS.



.Mr. Braid.

Hardisty (First
moon) .

Captain Olavering (of the Com-
mander-in-Chiefs Staff)

Tottle (Hepid Stewad of the Si- -i/j u y/ j

moon) .;{/.. .\\Al^MlVt^7:<^/. . Mr. Cullenford.

Moleskin (a Detective) i^'lei^.eL.-Wi.aU. Mr. Clabe.

Limpet (Sir Solomon' Man) &.cCi^t':-\^x^. Mr. Cob.

Mrs. Sebright .jxUJ.^^<t..fdUc^.c^^i Mrs. Charles Mathews.

Mrs. Lovibond ^T.Q>.-^^Xt^..j^.J^vi>nry.v7rs/. Miss Wilkins.

Miss Colepepper. ..i3j4^^,oC^p/lnA^...«XC«<«/<£l/.'.... Miss Ternan.

Mrs. Gvimwood (her Maid) /.O. /:<^..i,£lLMj . u Miss "Weekes.

Mrs. Kabbits ^ >/. Cu^.dtUJj ..... Mrs. Griffiibs.

Ayahs, Stewards, Lascars, Passengers, etc.



SCENERY, Etc.



ACT I. — Scene: The Saloon of the "Simoon" under the poop deck. A long

I I .1 I

Door. Door.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Table.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Door.



Q»FT

EST. OF J H. CORNING
JUNE 20. 1940



THE OVEULAXD EOUTB.



cabin, lighted from a large skylight in the ceiling. The doors of the births are
uniform in appearance, the upper panels closed with green Venetians. The sa-
loon is handsomely decorated. Through the two doorways at the end, a view of the
deck of the steamer. A table in the centre with seats round it.
ACT II. — Scene: The poop deck of the " Simoon," towards evening; a tropical



Staircase.
....| I-



Rail. ^ Staircase.
1 I—.




sunset sky ; an awning spread ; cabin skylight combings seen above the deck, with
Beats round them ; seats at the gangways ; companion seen beyond the skylight.
At the back, the rail bounding the poop deck, with openings for the staircases leads
ing to the waist of the vessel. Lounging chairs disposed about.
ACT HI.— Scene : A coral reef coming down to the edge of the sea, which is seen



: Tent for





onoo
OOOOO
Barrels.




: Women and •

: Children. • :




• Store
• Tent.


[][][] [] :

Cases. :

G :


I r' "*' "


")


"•


cnG :
^nn :

Cases. :


: •


QGong.


1


. ^ •


: ~~


— ,







in flat. Rough tents i-igged out of spars and sails, e. and i.. That to the r. iathe
tent occupied by the women and children ; it occupies three entrances. That to the
I,., which projects so as to intercept part of the sea view, is the store tent. Barrels,
cases, wine and beer bottles, and preserved meat cases are partially visible, piled
about and imder it ; a gong hung on a spar near it, and a flag hoisted on a flagstaff.



COSTUMES.

Mk. Colepepper. — Suit of nankeen, with white jean vest ; low-cut shoes.
Major McTukk.— Fatigue uniform coat, white panta and vest, the latter with gilt
buttons.



4 THE OTEKLAND EOtTTE.

Bib Solomok Fraseh, K. C. B. — Eich India dressing gown, wMte vest and pants;

low-cut shoes.
Me. Lovibond. — 'White cotton night cap, and white flannel dressing gown. Second

dress : Check pants and vest, linen ; light tweed coat.
Tom Dexter. — Plain tweed travelling suit, light in material, dark in color. Second

dress : Surgeon's uniform of P. and O. S. S. Company.
Captain Smart.— Uniform of P. and O. S. S. Company.
Habdisty. — Uniform of first officer of the P. and O. S. S. Company.
Captain Clateeing.— Undress uniform of captain in Hon, E. I. Co.'s service.
ToTTLE.— Steward's uniform of P. and O. S. S. Co.
Moleskin. — Suit of dark blue nankeen.

Limpet. — Suit of white linen. Second dress : Guernsey shirt, and red plush breeches.
Mrs. Sebright. — Fashionable dress of handsome India sprigged muslin.

Note. — In Act JII. the characters have different hats, caps, shoes, from those worn
in Acts I. and II. ; and every article should have a careless and hap-bazard appear-
ance. 'iFor Properties and Stage Directions see last page.]



SYNOPSIS OF THE PLAY.

As the title of this play indicates, the action of the piece brings out in strong
relief the incidents of a voyage from India in an Orient^ steamship. Acts I.
and //. occur on board the steamer ; Act HI. on a desolate coral reef. The piece
has many capital and strongly defined characters. It is not possible to do any-
thing like justice to the great merits of this play, either as regards plot or
characters, by a brief sketch— but the following outline may give some general idea
of the piece. Among the heterogeneous ingredients thrown together in the saloon of
the steamship Simoon, are Mb. Colepeppbr (with an only daughter, and she was
passing fair), a rich commissioaer ; Sir Solomon, a high India official ; Major Mc-
Tdhk; a Captain Claveiiing, a staff-ofiiJer ; an attractive married lady, Mrs. Se-
bright ; a dashing married lady, Mhs. Lovibond ; several ofiicers of the ship, and
though last not least, Tom Dexter. Mr. Colepepper and Sir Solomon are both
desperately in love with Mrs. Sebright, and each offer her very tempting inducements
to bestow her hand upon him. The lady plays them as a skillful angler does a trout ;
but keeps them well out in the stream. Meanwhile McTurk is quite as busy seek-
ing to captivate Mes. Lovibond, who is equally tantalizing in her behavior. Mr.
Colepeppeb's daughter all this time is ciosely attended by Captain Clavering,
who appears to have won her confidence, though not her iiffcctions. This is the
state of affairs when one Tom Dexter appears upon the scene. This individual
(who en passant is a splendid character), suddenly appears amidst all this cooing and
billing, upon the Captain's invitation, brought about in this manner: the ship's
surgeon is stricken down with tever, but his place is more than filled by the volun-
teer services of Tom Dexter, a steerage passenger, who, besides being a skillful
medico, proves himself an able and considerate adviser and consoler. The Captain
brings Tom into the cabin, inducts him into the sick doctor's place, and Tom, nothing
loth, soon becomes the ruling spirit of the scene. He soon gives Mrs. Sebright to
understand that her flirtations may not be so innocent as she deems them; makes
Mrs. LoviBOSD mind her p's and q's; cuts the comb of Captain Clavbring; and
brings to Miss Colepepper's recollection the fact that her life was saved during the
Sepoy mutiny by a gentleman not unlike Tom Dexter. There is an under current
of broad farce running through this piece. Mr. Lovibond had bought the ticket
of a man accused of a felony, and had given the name corresponding to the ticket,
a detective shadows him, and a variety of droll situations grow out of this queer
misunderstanding. In Act III., when the whole party are thrown upon the desert
reef, the lion's skin is dropped, and all the personages appear us they really are.
Here Tom Dexter comes out strong, and finally through his skillful management,
explanations, followed by reconciliations, take place, and everything is lovely.



THE OVERLAND ROUTE.



ACT I.

• SCENE. — The saloon of the Simoon under the poop dec!:.

As the curtain rises, Tottle and two steward's mates are seen dusting table

and seats.

Limpet {at door of cabin, No. 3, l.). Mr. Tottle ! 'Ow often am I to
horder Sir Solomon's brandy and sodal

Gkimwood [at door of cabin No. 2, E.). I've been a-calling for my young
lady's tea this half hour !

Tottle. Aye, aye, miss. — Coming, Mr. Limpet. — Jackson, brandy and
soda for No. 10- (Jackson is guing.)

Grim. No , we're No. 10. It's tea we want. (Jackson returns )

Limpet. We're No. 6. \Exit Jackson, perplexed.

Tot. Aye, aye, sir. Tea for No. 6, Smiles. (Smiles going.)

1st Ayah (from cabin No. 4, l.). Missy wants doctor very bad, Tnassa
steward. {^TAihzs pauses.)

ToT. Aye, aye. Smiles, the doctor for No. 3, and look alive !

2nd Ayah (from cabin No. 4, r. Re-enter Jackson with soda and tea).
Miss Polly Rabbits and Massa Charley very sick. Missy Rabbits' com-
pliments, and hope de doctor send dem powders.

Tot. Aye, aye. The doctor, No. 4, Jackson, directly.

[Exit 3 kCKSo^.

Hakdistt {putting in his head at entrance, r. c). Steward, bear a hand
on deck here.

Tot. Aye, aye, sir. Bless my heart ! Here's work for one head and
the usual allowance of arms and legs.

Limp. ^ all putting their ( Brandy and soda !

Grim. (_ heads out of ) Tea !

1st Ayah. T their cabins at "^ De doctor for missy !

2nd Ayah, j once. [^ De powders "for de babies !

Hard, {putting in his head again). Hilloa ! Saloon there !

ToT. {hastily gives Limpet the cup of tea and Geimwood the brandy and
soda-water bottle). Aye, aye, sir! {rushes out, r. c.)

Limp. ) Tea ! 1 ordered soda and brandy.

Grim. ) Man — this ain't tea !

Limp, {coming forward with tea). Such attendance ! Here's your tea,
Mrs. Grimwood, if 1 might trouble you for our soda and brandy.

Grim. Really, Mr. Limpet, it's disgraceful. I do 'ope your master
will write to the Times when we get 'ome.

Limp. That you may rely on, Mrs. Grimwood ; if he don't make a rep-
resentation to the guv'ment. Sir Solomon ain't used to this sort of
thing.



6 THE OYEELAND EOITIE.

Grim. Nor us, neither, I can assure you, Mr. Limpet. What with
Khitmagars, Chuprassees, and Punkahwallahs, we'd more servants up
the country in Badgerypore, than we knew what to do with.

Limp. Just like us. But, for all that, I shan't be sorry to be back in
dear old Hengland, if I've to do for Sir Solomon all bj- myself for the
rest of my born days.

Grim. Nor me neither, Mr. Limpet. But, bless me, the tea's a-getting
cold.

Limp. And the soda-water's a-getting hot.

Grim. Good morning, Mr. Limpet. [JExit into cabin No. 2, R.

Limp. Good morning, Mrs. Grimwood. [Exit into cabin No. 3, l.

Enter, from e. d. c. in flat, Capt. Smart, a telescope in his hand, and
Haedisty,

F Smart. Well, Hardisty, as we're clear of the straits, I shall turn in for
the rest of the watch ; tell the second officer to look alive, and get the
new passengers shaken down.

Hard. What, with the sick and sorry, there's work for three doctors
among 'em, let alone Kingston at his best ; and now he's regularly on
his beam ends.

Smart. What d'ye mean ? The doctor down ! Nothing serious I
hope.

Hard. I sent Tottle to inquire, sir. Here he comes.

Enter Tottle, e. c.

Smart. Well, Tottle; what's the report from the doctor 1

Tot. The doctor's compliments, sir, and he's got the fever, sir ; and
if the attack goes on all right, he ought to be delirious about eight bells.

Smart. Delirioue ! And invalids on board, too ! Suppose it should
spread.

Hard. And the ship so crowded with those Aden passengers.

Smart. By-the-bye, I've hardly overhauled the list yet, Tottle.

Tot. Here it is, sir I was a-making out the dinner places, {produces
list. Smart examines it.)

Enter Moleskin, behind, r. c.

There's one on 'em, sir — berth No. 2, there — by the name of Downy.

Moleskin {aside). Holloa ! {listens.)

Tot. 1 never see a man look so green. He said it was no use my put-
ting him down, for his head was a-turniug round so he'd he sure to come
up t'other side of the table.

Mole, {com in ff forward). Poor Mr. Downy !

Smart. Downy, eh ? I remember ; he's a Singapore passenger, en-
gaged his berth from Calcutta, but came aboard at Aden.

Mole. Ah! 1 daresay he had some good reason ; which, did you say
was his cabin ?

Tot. {pointing). No. 2, sir. Had you any business with him 1

Mole. Oh, dear, no ! I only asked from humanity. I'm sorry he's so
near the stein. He'll feel the motion very badly, (aside) My man, as
sure as a toucher ! (retires up and makes entries in a note-book, and strolls

off, R. C.)

Smart {to Hardisty). An inquisitive customer that— always poking
his nose into everybody's concerns. But about this precious business
of the doctor 1



ACT I. 7

Habd. Here's the major in charge of the invalids, sir.
Enter Major McTukk, d. l. c.

McTuRK { pom2ioiisly). Ah, Smart! Pleasant morning; a spanking
breeze well on the quarter— she's doing ten knots. I've timed her. {pat-
ronizingly to Haedisty) Good morning, Mr. Hardisty.

Smart. How are j'our invalids, major ?

McT. Oh ! the fellows are settling down comfortably enough. That
doctor of yours is a smart hand.

Smart {aside). Now for it. A capital oflScer, major. But even doctors
can't always keep their own bills o health clean.

McT. What do you mean ? Why he's hopping about the steerage
like a sanitary inspector ; and there ke is fumigating, and airing, and
Burnete-fluiding to say nothing of physicking.

Smart {aside). The doctor must have been taken delirious at seven
bells instead of eight. I'm very glad you're satisfied, major.

McT. Why, the man's laugh is as good as a tonic.

Smart. His laugh ! {aside) The doctor must be delirious ! Didn't it
sound rather wild 'i

McT. Wild ! not a bit of it. Clear as a bell, and collected as a word
of command. I was so pleased with the fellow that I asked for his card,
a thing one's not in the habit of doing with a medico, even in the ser-
vice. Here it is {shows card) — Dexter — " T. Dexter, M. R. C. S." I
said rather a good thing, apropos of the card. " Well, Mr. Dexter,"
I said, " you're well named, for a more dexterous practitioner I never
came across." Dexterous— jou see. Ha, ha! Not bad was it, for an
off-hand thing 1

Smart. Capital ! {aside) Who the devil can this be, I wonder ?

JEnter Mrs. Lovibond from her cabin, 1 e. l.
McT. Ah ! Mrs. Lovibond I

Smart converses aside with Tottle, who goes off.

In full bloom like a rose with the morning dew on it.

Mrs. L. Now, Major, how can you "? Good morning, Captain. Do
you think I may venture on deck 7 You're sure those Lascars have
done swabbing and swish-swishing about with those dreadful rope
mops without handles 1

Smart. Deck's as dry as a drawing-room, ma'am.
• Mrs. L. Then, major, may I ask for your arm ?

McT. {aside to her). Both of 'em, my dearest lady.

Mrs. L. The motion of the vessel really so throws one on some kind
of support.

McT. The more it throws you on me, the better I shall like it.

Mrs. L. Ah ! Major !

[Exeimt, coquettishly, leaning on the Major, l. d. f.

Smart. That's a case, Hardisty.

Hard. She's giving him a full broadside, sir, at all events.

Smart. Astonishing how these widows knock over the military. But
who can this extempore Doctor be, I wonder ? I sent Tottle to make
him out.

Enter Tottle, k. c.

■^ Tot. It's all-right, sir. He's worth six of Dr. Kingston, any day ; why,



8 THE OTEKXAND KOUrE.

he makes his patients laugh on the right side o' their mouths, till tliey
quite takes their physic with a happetite.

Smart. I never heard of a regular doctor doing that, eh, Hardisty ?

Tot. The women is a-blessing on him, right and left, and the babies —
you'd think he'd served his time in a foundling hospital, to see the way
he handles the little hinnocenLs.

Smaut. Say Captain Smart wishes to see him aft, directly he's at
liberty.

Tot. Aye. aye, sir ! [Exit Tottle, e. c.

Smart. Why, Hardisty, this is a regular god-send.

Enter 1st Atah frmn cabin No. 4, l.

1st Atah. Bless me ! I wonder where dat Doctor ; Mem Sahib want
him ever so bad.

Enter 2d Ayah from cabin No. 4, e.



2d Atah. Tou just wait, please. Miss, till doctor come see my Missy
babas.

1st Atah. '^ all C (fOMi^M^tooMsZt/) Who your Missy baba ?

2d Atah. > speaking < What your Mem Sahib, I like to know 1

3d Atah. ) together (^ Oh ! Please, Captain Sahib.

Smart. Silence ! you chattering blackbirds ! {exeunt Atahs, chattering
into their respective cahinsi Just come into my cabin, Hardisty. What
with Lascar crews, Madras parrots, and up country Ayahs, a fellow
might as well sail Cantain of Noahs Ark, as a P. and 0. steamer.

[Exeunt Haedistt and Smart, d. l. c.

Enter 3d Ayau from cabin, 1 e. r., Mocks at Sir Solomon's cabin, 3 e, l.,
Limpet looks out.

3d Atah. Missy Sebright's salaam to Burra Sahib Fraser, and she 'ope
he gib her his arm on deck dis morning.

Sir S. (within). Say I shall be happy.

Limp. Sir Solomon will be hap

Sir S. No. On second thought, Limpet, substitute for the word happy
— the word de-lighted.

Limp. Say Sir Solomon will be de-lighted.

3d Ayah. I tell Mem Sahib. [Exit into cabin 1, e. b.

Enter Sir Solomon f?-om cabin 3, b. l. attended by Limpet, carrying his
pith-cap and umbrella.

Sir S. Yon, Limpet, I dare say, would not perceive any great dis-
tinction between the expressions — I shall be happy, and I shall be
delij2,hted.

Limp. No, Sir Solomon. If I might make bold, I should think it
were about six o' one and half-a-dozen of the other.

Sir S. [with a feeble laugh). He! he! he! There are a good many men
in high diplomatic positions, not a bit more discriminating than you,
Limpet.

Limp. I dare say. Sir Solomon.

Sir S. My solar topee, Limpet. (Limpit gives pith-hat) Have you con-
sulted the thermometer this morning 1
, Limp. Eighty in the shade. Sir Solomon.

Sir S. In that case, my umbrella, Limpet. (Limpet gives it) One can-



ACT I. 9

not take too great precautions against exposing the brain to the sun.
Limpet, the head is my weak point.

Limp. I should think so, Kir Solomon,

SiK S. When I say "the head," understand me, Limpet, I do not
mean the head intellectually considered, but the material integument of
the brain. Limpet, you appreciate the distinction ? -

Limp. You mean the skull. Sir Solomon?

S114 S. Precisely. My skull is thin. Limpet — all highly organized
skulls are thin, — yours is thick, Limpet; you are not highly organized.

Limp. No, I'm only a tliick-headed Limpet. [Uxit Limpet, 3 e. l.

Ilnter Mr. Colbfeffer froin his cabin, 3d e. e.

Cole, {comes forward'). Good morning. Sir Solomon.

Sir S. Ah ! Mr, Colepepper ! stirring so early ^ Arn't you afraid of
the morning air ?

Cole. No, sir ; nor the moi'ning sun neither, and that's more than you
can say, to judge by your precautions, [pointing topith-hat and umbrella.)


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