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The need of a history of New York online

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were greatly encouraged in the City." The City Hall was altered and improved
at a very considerable expense. A committee of the Common Council reported
a plan of "Alteration and Ornaments," to the building, which was approved and
to defray the computed cost of £3,000 a lottery was established. Among other
improvements, the building was made much higher, and roofed with copper pro-
cured from England. The "canopy" or "balcony" in the front of the building
was brought out to range with the two wings. A cupola of more imposing dimen-
sions was raised upon the building; and a bell of larger dimensions than the old
one.

In 1788 there was a very spirited contest between Philadelphia and New
York for the honor of having the seat of government.

From New York Journal, August 14, 1788: "Yesterday the question for
filling up the blank in the ordinance for organizing the New Government, fixing
the place for the meeting of the Congress, When for New York there appeared
five states and a-half, against it, four and a-half; ten states only being present
which voted. From the present complexion there is the greatest reason to hope
that the question will finally be carried in favor of New York."

New York Journal, March 5, 1789. — "We hear that the improvements of the
City Hall are so far completed as to receive that respectable body. It is converted
into a superb edifice every way convenient for the grand purpose for which it was
designed, and is a rich and we hope will be a lasting ornament to the City." The
building was improved and altered according to plans of Major L'Enfants, a
French engineer, and then called Federal Hall.

1802 — A new City Hall (the present one). After much doubt and hesitation
as to the expense, the sum of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars was voted.
The corner-stone was laid September 20, 1803, by Edward Livingston, Mayor,
and the Corporation.

July 4, 181 1, the Corporation met at the new City Hall in the Mayor's room
for the first time. The actual cost of the building was $538,733.45.



NO COMPREHENSIVE HISTORY OF OUR STATE.

HE following are the number of histories of the original States:
New Hampshire, 4; Massachusetts, 8; Rhode Island, 4; Con-
necticut, 5; New York, o; New Jersey, 8; Pennsylvania, 8;
Delaware, 3; Maryland, 8; Virginia, 7; North Carolina, 5;
South Carolina, 3; Georgia, 5.

Among the numerous holidays observed in our State, not
one is in commemoration of any event within its border, nor to the honor of a
citizen.




So



THE NEED OE A HISTORY OE NEW YORK



Table showing percentage of troops contributed to the Continental cause in proportion

to the inhabitants.



Colony Inhabitants 1

New York 165,000 3

Massachusetts 291,000

Connecticut 196,000

New Hampshire 81,000

Rhode Island 5 5,000

Georgia 26,000

New Jersey 1 20,000

Pennsylvania 302,000

Maryland 200,000

Delaware 37,000

North Carolina : . . . 200,000

South Carolina 175,000



Troops 2


Approx.
Percentage


51,979 '
69,907


32
24


31,939


16


12,497

5,908

2,679

10,726

25,678


15
II

IO

9

9


i3>9 12

2,386
7,263


7
6

4


6,417


4



Table showing the number and States in which battles of the Revolution were fought.
It must also be remembered New York was overrun with Canadians, Indians

and Tories.

BATTLES OF THE REVOLUTION, I775-I783



Massachusetts. .

Canada

New York. . . .
Connecticut. . . .
Rhode Island . .
Pennsylvania . .
New Jersey . . . .

Delaware

Virginia

South Carolina .
North Carolina
Georgia



Total 27



1775


1776


1777


1778


1779


1780


1 78 1


1782


II


3




















7


8




















2


21


27


6


1 1


14


10


1


1





3





6


1


3





1





2


2























5

















4


10


4


4


8


1











2

















3


1


1


1


1





9





2


5








6


35


2 5


6





1











4


8








1


1


3


7


2


4


4



44



46



21



35



64



60



11



New York 92

South Carolina 79

New Jersey 31

Georgia 22

Virginia 16

Canada 15



Massachusetts 14

Connecticut 14

North Carolina 13

Rhode Island 5 5

Pennsylvania 5

Delaware 2



1 United States Census estimate.

2 " Battles of the American Revolution." — Col. Henry B. Carrington, M.A., LL.D.

3 Population 190,000, less City of New York, Westchester, and Brooklyn in possession of the
English, say 25,000 — 165,000.

4 "Archives of the Colony and Stare of New York."— James A. ROBERTS, Controller, 1898.
a From " Historical Register of Officers of the Continental Army, 1 775-1783." — Heitman.



THE NEED OF A HISTORY OF NEW YORK



5i



From " Decisive Battles of America," edited by Ripley Hitchcock.
Showing our State has been the battle-field of the Nation.

Conquest of the Pequots l &37 — Connecticut.

Champlain's Battle with the Iroquois 1646 — New York.

Defeat of King Philip 1673 — Massachusetts.

. Fall of Quebec 1759 — Canada.

Bunker Hill 1775 — Massachusetts.

Saratoga 1777 — New York.

Yorktown 1781 — Virginia.

Lake Erie 18 13 — New York.

Lake Champlain 1814 — New York.

Usually you would expect the Colonies in which the great events of the Revolu-
tion took place would be most mentioned in history, but such has not been the case,
as shown by "History of the United States of America." By George Bancroft.
Six volumes.

Number of times mentioned: Massachusetts, 277; Boston, 115; Virginia,
248; New York, no; New York City, 39; Pennsylvania, 80; Connecticut, 54.

The statesmen who did most for our country during the Revolutionary period
have shared the same injustice. General Washington stood pre-eminently at the
head. The others in rotation, according to their service.

Gouverneur Morris was no doubt one of the shrewdest observers of current
events in his day and said, "The purity of the patriotism of John Jay entitles him
to stand by the side of Washington."

Number of times mentioned: John Jay, New York, 38; Benjamin Franklin,
Pennsylvania, 121; Robert Morris, Pennsylvania, 38; George Clinton, New York,
24; John Adams, Massachusetts, 84; Jonathan Trumbull, Connecticut, 12; Gouver-
neur Morris, New York, 38; John Dickinson, Pennsylvania, 42; Patrick Henry,
Virginia, 41 ; Thomas Jefferson, Virginia, 49; James Duane, New York, 9; Samuel
Adams, Massachusetts, 82; Robert R. Livingston, New York, 12.



NEW YORK'S COMMITTEE OF CORRESPONDENCE.



Elected by the patriotic citizens of the city,
them in corresponding with their sister Colonies.
Congress through their Committees was worked out
the great Revolution.



John Alsop
William Bayard
Theophilaet Bache
Peter V. B. Livingston
Phillip Livingston
Isaac Sears
David Johnson
Charles McEvers
Charles Nicholl
Alexander McDougall
Capt. Thomas Randall
John Moore
Leonard Lispenard
Jacobus Van Zant
James Duane
Edward Laight
Isaac Low



Gerardus Duycknick
Peter Van Schaack
Henry Ramsen
Hamilton Young
George Bowne
Peter T. Curtenius
Peter Goelet
Thomas Persall
Elias Desbrosses
William Walton
Richard Yates
John De Lancey
John Thurman
John Broome
John Jay.
Abraham Brasher
Miles Sherwood



May 16, 1774, to represent

Prior to the first Colonial

the plan that brought about

Benjamin Booth
John Hallett
Charles Shaw
Alexander Wallace
James Jauncey
Gabriel H. Ludlow
Nicholas Hoffman
Abraham Walton
Gerard W. Beekman
Abraham P. Lott
David Van Home
Abraham Duryee
William McAdam
Richard Sharp
Thomas Marston
Joseph Bull



52



THE NEED OF A HISTORY OF NEW YORK




EAR SIR:

"The Members of the Lower Wall Street Business Men's
Association whose offices are in our Country's most Historical
Centre, realizing the neglect on the part of many writers of
History, in failing to give proper importance to Historical Events
occurring in our State, invited the Historical and Patriotic
Societies of the City to join with them whereby a plan may be
formulated that a History of our State might be written. October 31, 1914 — A
meeting of the Delegates from many of the Societies was held at the Coffee Ex-
change. Dr. George F. Kunz, Vice-President of the 'Tercentenary Commission,'
presided. Addresses were made by Col. Asa Bird Gardiner, Hon. Charles H. Sher-
rill, Dr. William Eliott Griffis of Ithaca, Dr. Thomas E. Finnegan, State Education
Dept., and A. Wakeman, Secretary.

"A resolution was adopted that Mr. William Bayne, Jr., President of the
Association, appoint a ' Committee of Nine ' to carry out the objects of the meeting.

"The following plan given below was considered most available. Invitations
were sent to the Historical and Patriotic Societies and Associations throughout the
State asking for their co-operation. Favorable responses were received from
practically all the Societies, representing a membership of over 30,000 of our best
citizens.

"The Press very kindly and greatly assisted by publishing notices of the pro-
posed Historical Contest. The Committee have received 160 applications for their
conditions from all over the Country, and one from England, showing the great
interest there has been taken.

"The Subjects for Essays have been selected with the view of having fuller
accounts written of important events occurring in Our State, than can be expected
in the History. In the Public Libraries and with our Historical Societies are many
original manuscripts of the greatest importance to the history of our State, that
remain inaccessible to the general reader. The Committee hope they may be
able to publish the more important ones. As its History belongs to the whole
State, all should have the opportunity to assist in carrying out this great work.

"It is their earnest desire that all publications be sold at prices so low that
every home should have them, and if possible every public library in the State
(gratuitously) thereby instilling a just pride in their state, within whose borders
much history has been made. In soliciting from you a subscription, it should be
remembered this work is lasting in its results. The publications will be of much
benefit to the future generations as to the present. What more noble work can be
accomplished than the uplifting of our Great State to its proper place in History
after a century of neglect. The Committee's work is purely patriotic, and all
money received will be devoted to the cause. Copies of the Essays and History
will be sent to Subscribers.

"Kindly make checks payable to Stuyvesant Fish, Treasurer, 52 Wall Street.

"Yours very truly,

"Committee of Nine."



HISTORY OF NEW YORK.



EAR SIR:

As not a few writers concerning the History of New York
have made statements which are inaccurate and misleading, the
United Historical and Patriotic Socities and Associations offer
the following conditions to be considered by those wishing to
compete for prizes for a Historical work on New York to 1790,
_ the beginning of Government under the Federal Constitution.
It is desired to obtain a history that will truthfully show New York's par-




THE NEED OF A HISTORY OF NEW YORK 53

ticipation in the events that led to the establishment of the United States as an
independent nation, to be written in an interesting form.

To encourage those who from a patriotic sense of duty might wish to assist
in this worthy and necessary work, there are offered three prizes: First, one
thousand dollars; second, five hundred; and third, two hundred fifty dollars for
the manuscript considered by the Committee most deserving.

The Committee reserve the right of increasing the emoluments, also to reject
any or all manuscripts, but will pay for those by them selected, as above stated.
Should they deem proper to publish same, full credit will be given to the authors.

The manuscripts will be judged in units of one hundred. General excellency,
accuracy, subjects not before printed, arrangement of subjects, literary style, and
conciseness will be considered.

Authority for all statements must be given, and if from other writers, so far
as practicable their authority. It is the desire of the Committee that so far as
possible all data shall be taken from original documents or contemporary papers.

Manuscripts offered for competition must be signed with nom de plume and
delivered to the Secretary on or before October 1, 1916, accompanied with writer's
full name, nom de plume, and address enclosed in a sealed envelope, and with a
letter in the form following:

"Having read the conditions relative to the prizes offered by the United
Historical and Patriotic Societies and Associations, I fully agree to the
terms as stated and to accept the Committee's decision as final."

The Manual of New York's History to contain about one hundred thousand
words; to be printed in octavo and illustrated.

Manuscripts must be typewritten.

The copyright will be in the name of the United Historical and Patriotic-
Societies and Associations, and all manuscripts not selected and paid for as above
provided, will be returned to authors.

It is proposed to offer a further prize of one hundred dollars for the best essay
containing about ten thousand words, based on facts with authorities given, on
certain subjects to be hereafter designated by the Committee. Conditions to be
substantially similar to those provided herein for the history, except that manu-
scripts may be offered to the Committee when and as the authors complete them.

Committee of Nine,
Abram Wakeman, Secretary, George F. Kunz, Chairman.

96 Water Street.

List of Subjects for Essays.

1. The Character of Dutch Rule in New Netherland and the Reasons for its
Downfall.
The Rise and Decline of the Leislerian Party in New York.
The Dutch and English Manorial System in New York.
Relations with the Five Nations.
The Struggle between the French and the English for the Ontario and Niagara

Frontier.
The Zenger Case and the Establishment of Freedom of the Press.
German Immigration into New York in the Eighteenth Century.
The Albany Congress of 1754.
New York in the French and Indian War.
The Controversy over the New Hampshire Grants.

The Attitude of New York during the Controversy over the Stamp Act.
Sons of Liberty and Committee of Correspondence, 1 765-1776.
New York and the Policy of Commercial Non-Intercourse, 1765-1776.
New York's Tea Party, 1774.



54 THE NEED OF A HISTORY OF NEW YORK

15. New York and the Campaign of 1776.

16. The Burgoyne Campaign, 1777.

17. George Clinton and the Establishment of Government under the First

State Constitution.

18. The Career of John Jay during the Revolution.

19. Alexander Hamilton and the Federal Constitution.

20. Evacuation of New York by the British and Washington's Farewell to His

Officers, 1783.

21. History of City or Federal Hall.

22. New York's Societies and Associations prior to 1800.

23. Early Schools and Schoolmasters.

24. Historical and Patriotic Societies and Associations of New York.



Historical and Patriotic Societies and Associations Who Have Endorsed

the Committee's Plan.

Albany Institute and Historical Art Association.

American Jewish Society.

American Scenic and Historic Preservation Society.

Broome County Historical Society.

Buffalo Historical Society.

Cayuga County Historical Society.

Chautauqua County Society of History and Natural Science.

Chappaqua Historical Society.

City History Club of New York.

Colonial Dames of America.

Committee on Library — New York Stock Exchange.

Dames of the Revolution.

Daughters of the American Revolution.

Daughters of the Cincinnati.

Daughters of the Holland Dames.

Daughters of the Revolution.

Descendants of Colonial Governors.

De Witt Historical Society.

Empire State Society — Sons of the American Revolution.

Falls House (Newburgh).

Flushing Historical Society.

Franklin County Historical Society.

Genesee County Pioneer Association.

Geneva Historical Society.

Herkimer County Historical Society.

Historical Society of Whitehall.

Historical Society Newburgh Bay and the Highlands

Holland Society of New York.

Huguenot Society of America.

Huntington Historical Society.

Jefferson County Historical Society.

Johnstown Historical Society.

Kanestro Valley Chapter.

King's County Historical Society.

Livingston County Historical Society.

Lower Wall Street Business Men's Association.

Madison County Historical Society.

Maiden Lane Historical Society.

Mary Washington Colonial Chapter — D. A. R.

Minisink Valley Historical Society.



THE NEED OF A HISTORY OF NEW YORK 55

Montgomery County Historical Society.

Morris Memorial Historical Society.

N. Y. Chapter, Daughters of the Founders and Patriots of America.

New York Genealogical and Biographical Society.

New York Historical Society.

New York State Historical Association.

New York State Society of the Cincinnati.

New York Society of the Order of the Founders and Patriots of America.

Niagara Frontier Historical Society.

Oneida Historical Society.

Oswego Historical Association.

Putnam County Historical Society.

Rockland Historical and Forestry Society.

Sag Harbor Historical Society.

Saint George's Society of New York.

Saint Nicholas Society, City of New York.

Salem Historical Society.

Schoharie County Historical Society.

Seneca Falls Historical Society.

Scottsville Literary Society.

Society of Tammany, New York.

Tarrytown Historical Society.

Ticonderoga Historical Society.

Tuesday Historical Society (Friendship, N. Y.).

Ulster Historical Society.

Vallonia Historical Society.

Washington Continental Guard.

Washington Headquarters Association.

Waterloo Library and Historical Society.

Westchester County Historical Society.

Yonkers Historical and Library Association.

Department of History, Columbia University.
Department of History, Syracuse University.
Department of History, Union College.
President White Library, Cornell University.

Dr. John H. Finley, Commissioner of Education of the State of New York and
President of the University of the State of New York.

Dr. Nicholas Murray Butler, President of Columbia University.
Dr. C. D. Walcott, Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution.

Other Historical or Patriotic Societies or Associations in New York wishing to
join with the above are invited to communicate with the Secretary.




iiiiiiif RftRY 0F " congress

014 107 914 l?





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Online LibraryUnited historical and patriotic societies and assoThe need of a history of New York → online text (page 8 of 8)