United States. Adjutant-General's Office.

Correspondence relating to the war with Spain and conditions growing out of the same, including the insurrection in the Philippine Islands and the China relief expedition, between the adjutant-general of the army and military commanders in the United States, Cuba, Porto Rico, China, and the Philippi online

. (page 12 of 113)
Online LibraryUnited States. Adjutant-General's OfficeCorrespondence relating to the war with Spain and conditions growing out of the same, including the insurrection in the Philippine Islands and the China relief expedition, between the adjutant-general of the army and military commanders in the United States, Cuba, Porto Rico, China, and the Philippi → online text (page 12 of 113)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


true, you will designate another regiment. It is the desire of this Department to
meet Colonel Barber's wishes as far as consistent with the interests of the service.

H. C. CoREiN, Adjutant-Oeneral.



' Adjutant-General's Office,
Washington, July 14, 1898 — S.SO p. m.
Major-General Otis, San Francisco, Cal.:

Having reference to telegram that yon should stop at Honolulu, the Secretary
of War now directs that you need not give the matter any further consideration
than to confer with General Merriam and have the reginaent to take station there
to report to him. This to enable you to give your entire attention to the embar-
kation and departure of your command for the Philippines. It is feared any delay
on your part at Honolulu m.ight interfere with the expedition.
By order Secretary of War:

H. C. CoRBiN, Adjutant-General,



AFFAIRS nr THE PBILirPTN"E ISLANDS. 733

Adjutant-General's Office,
Washington, July 24, 189S — S.45 p. m.
Major-General MERiiiAM,.Saw i^OTicisco, Cal.: .

General Otis wiU order a regiment to report to you to occupy tlie Hawaiian
Islands. You will cause arrangements to be made on tte lines understood by
General Otis, which, we will explain to you. Should you deem it best to go in
person, with one aid, to examine sites, etc., you are authorized to do so.
By order Secretary War:

H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant-General.



San Francisco, Cal., July J4, 1898.

(Beceived 3.55 p.m.)
Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C:

Troops placed on board steamers City of Puebla and Peru to-day, and I await
answer to my request for instructions in telegram of yesterday.

Otis,
Major- General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.



San Francisco, Cal., July 24, 1898.

(Received 4.02 p.m.)
Adjutant-General,U. S. Ariiy, Washington, D. C:

Colonel Barber is a good soldier and says he can not object to any service which
Government assigns. He is preparing bis regiment for Honolulu and will doubt-
less sail with a portion of it in a very few days.

Otis,
Major- General, U. S. Volunteers, Commanding.



San Francisco, Cal., July U, 1898.

(Received 8.01 p.m.)
Adjutant-General ,U. S. Army, Washington, D, C:

Your telegram of to-day just received and not understood. Former expedi-
tions have had sailing orders how to proceed, where convoys are to be met, and
ultimate destination. The steamers Peru and Puebla are loaded and ready to
start under orders given men to go with them and stop at Honolulu and there
await for remainder of expedition, to leave 23d instant, and disposition of ofQcers,
property, and freight has been made accordingly. All orders were issued yester-
day and to-day for the loading of remaining vessels, and if steamer St. Paul
arrives within next two days the last vessel can leave here by 21st unless ordered
to the contrary. I will sail on Peru to-mon'ow or Saturday and await at Hono-
lulu for the remaining transports, as intended, but request definite sailing orders.

Otis, Major-General.



Adjutant-General's Office,
Washington, July 14, 1898 — 9.30 p. m.
Major-General Otis, San Francisco, Cat:

The Secretary War is glad you are going to be able to stop at Honolulu, and
approves your going to-morrow. The impression obtained that possibly this
would delay the expedition. To avoid this the telegram this afternoon was sent
you, andwas not in any way intended to interfere with your plans already made.
Get away accordingly, and may good fortune go with you.
By order Secretary War:

H, C. CORBiN, Adjutant-General.



734 OOREESPONDEWCE.

Butte, Mont., July 16, 189S.

(Received 4.30 p. m.)
Hon. R. A. Alger, Secretary War, Washington, D. C.;

First Regiment Montana Volunteer Infantry is ordered to sail for Manila on
23d instant. Please permit no change to be made in these orders which, will leave
onr regiment behind. Answer.

Lee Mantle.



San Francisco, Cal., July 16, 1S9S.

(Received 6.21 p. m.
Secretary of War, Washington, D. C:

I reqiuest permission to join my regiment at Manila.

James E. Barnett,
Lieutenant-Colonel Tenth Pennsylvania Infantry, U. S. Volunteers,



Adjutant-General's Office,
Washington, July 17, 189S — 1S.S6 p. m.
Hon. Lee Majijtle, Butte, Mont.:

Your telegram 16th to Secretary War. No change contemplated here.

H. C. CoRBiK, Adjutant-General.



Camp Merritt, Cal., July 17, 1898.

(Received July 18, 1898—1.50 a. m.)
Adjutant-General of the Army, Washington, D. C.

Sir: I am appealed to by the officers and men of the Seventh California Infan-
try, and by a multitude of the regiment's friends, to urge the selection of that
regiment for early dispatch to Manila. I do not mean to interfere with the orders
of my superiors, who have already chosen the troops for the fourth expedition,
but, without exceeding my authority I will earnestly request the President,
through the Secretary of War, to order the early advance of this faithful, efficient,
VF ell-disciplined, and excellent regiment, and I earnestly recommend the charter
of the necessary vessels for that purpose.

Harrison Gray Otis,
Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers,

Commanding Third Brigade.

War Department,
Washington, July IS, 1898.
Sir: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th
instant, inclosing copy of a dispatch dated May 13, from our consul at Manila,
relative to the political situation in the Philippine Islands.
Very respectfully,

R. A. Alger, Secretary of War.
The Secretary of State.



Adjutant-General's Office,

Washington, July IS, 1S93.
Major-General Merriam,

Commanding Department California, San Francisco, Cal.:
Secretary War directs that any portion of troops originally assigned to thd
Philippine expedition remaining in San Francisco report to you for purposes of



AFFAIRS IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 735

further equipment, drill, and discipline. Secretary War further directs thafc
Camp Merritt be abandoned and these troops be placed in camp on the Presidio
Keservation. This will be authority for the commanding ofB.cer of these troops
to repori; as herein directed. Acknowledge receipt.

H. C. CoBBiN, Adjutant-General.



WiSHiNGTON, D. C, July 18, 1898.

(Received 1.35 p. m..)
Hon. George D. Meiklejohn,

Assistant Secretary of War, Washington, D. C:
I shall feel personally obliged if you will direct that the recruits for the Tenth
Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, now in San .Francisco, be immediately
equipped for service, and that Lieut. Col. James E. Barnett, of the same regiment,
be ordered to immediately proceed to Manila with the recruits as soon as trans-
portation can be provided. I make this as a personal request. Kindly reply by
wire.

Boies Penrose.



San Francisco, Cal., July 18, 1898.

(Received 8.32 p.m.)
Adjutant-GeneraX,!!. S. Army, Washington, D. C:

Complying telegram directing report to be rendered regarding transports: Penn-
sylvania sails 19th, 54 of&cers, 1,294 enlisted men, 1,280 rifles, caliber .45, and 200
rounds ammunition per man.

Merriam, Major-General, Commanding,



San Francisco, Cal., July 18, 1898.

(Received 9.27 p.m.)
Hon, R. A. AivGER, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C:

Seventh California Infantry has been in camp in San Francisco since May 7.
It is splendidly equipped, drilled, and disciplined. It was once ordered aboard ship
to go to the Philippines and orders subsequently revoked. Officers and men greatly
disappointed being withheld from active service. I earnestly hope you can con-
sistently order them to Philippines by next transport. Your many California
friends will greaxly appreciate your interest in their behalf. Please answer.

George C. Perkins.



SiN Francisco, Cal., July 18, 1898.

(Received 9.30 p.m.)
Adjutant-General Corbin, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C:

Your many friends in California earnestly hope you can comply with request
Seventh Regiment California Infantry wired Secretary War to-day.

George C. Perkins.



San Francisco, Cal., July 18, 1898.

(Received 9.51 p.m.)
Adjtttant-General,U. S. Army, Washington, D. C:

Telegram reference new "Washington battalion and abandonment of Camp
Merritt as assignment to me expeditionary forces received. /

Merriam, Major-General, Commanding.



736 OOEEESPONBENOE.

San Francisco, Cal., July 18, isos.

(Received 11.28 p.m.)
Hon. R. A. Alger, Washington, D. C:

Will it not be possible to have Seventb California Regiment orderBd West
Indies or Manila? They are equipped and personnel equal to any in service.'
Were among first mustered in. Very anxious to go to the front.

U. S. Git ANT, Jr.



Adjutant-General's Office,

Washington, July 19, 1898.
General Mereiam, San Francisco, Cal.:
What troops — give letters of companies — sailed vrith General Otis 15th instant?
• H. C. CORBIN, Adjutant-General.



Adjutant-Generals Office,
Washington, July 20, 1898—12.30 a. m.
Commanding General, Department of California,

San Francisco, Cal.:
Report by telegraph the number and strength of each regiment now in your
command originally intended for the Philippine expedition.
By order Secretary War:

H. C. CORBiN, Adjutant-General.



San Francisco, Cal., July SO, 1898.

(Received 3.45 p. m.)
Adjutant-General Corbin, Washington, D. C:

Complete Philippine organizations still here as follovps: United States Volun-
teer Engineer battalion, ten of&cers, 347 men; battalion California Heavy Artil-
lery, 13 officers, 453 men; Twentieth Kansas, 46 officers, 1,243 men; First Tennes-
see, 46 officers, 1,257 men; Seventh California, 40 officers, 1.232 men; Fifty-first
Iowa, 50 officers, 1,336 men; First South Dakota, 45 officers, 998 men. Total, 250
officers and 6,868 men. Besides these, the First Washington and Eighth Cali-
fornia, both good full regiments, will be available here for field service shortly.

Merriam, Major-General.



San Francisco, Cal., July SO, 1898.

(Received 7.10 p.m.)
Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C:

Following organizations sailed with General Otis, 15th instant: C, E, G, I, K,
and L, Fourth Cavalry; D and G, Sixth Artillery; G, I, K, L, and M, Fourteenth
Infantry. Balance were detachment Signal Corps, recruits, etc.

Merriam, Major-General.



Nagasaki, received July 21, 1898 — 8.50 a. m.
Adjutant -General, Washington :
Cavite, July 21. — Steamer City Sydney sails San Francisco to-day.

Anderson, Commanding.



AFFAIRS IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.



737



Hea.dquartei« Department of the Pacific,
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, July 6, 1898. (Received July 21, 1898.)
The Adjutant-General, U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.

Sir: I tave the honor to suggest the steamer Newport, in which I am now pro-
ceeding to the PhiUippine Islands, as a vessel admirably adapted in every way for
one of the permanent fleet of transports which, I have been officially informed, it
is tlie intention of the War Department to furnish for the use of this expedition.

This vessel has recently had her boilers and engines thoroughly overhauled and
replaced, and wUl probably not require repairs in that direction for some time
come.

The inclosed tables show the more than ordinary facilities for ventilation pos-
sessed by this vessel and the economical expenditure of coal at a speed of 10
knots. The ship is capable of making 14 knots, and she is undoubtedly a very
excellent sea boat, as indicated by her behavior in a severe blow which we encoun-
tered soon after leaving San Francisco.

I desire to call the attention of the War Department particularly to tliis last
quality of the ship, as this is now the season of typhoons in the Philippines, and
it would be unwise to navigate in those waters with transports loaded with
troops, unless the ships were in every way fit to ride out a storm of great severity.
For a short run this ship could carry almost a full regiment.

For the reasons above stated I particularly recommend the purchase or hire of
this ship for the permanent use of the expedition in carrying troops to and from
the outlying islands, and that authority may be given me (by cable) to retain
her on arrival at Cavite, if I consider it desirable to do so.

Very respectfully, W. Merritt,

Major-General Commanding.

FACILITIES FOR VENTILATION, STEAMSHIP NEWPORT.

Forward of midships, in the steerage deck, there are three hatches; one is a
hatch 14 feet square. There are two companion ways 5 by 4, and one about 4 feet
square. Besides, there are two 14-inch iron ventilators — all forward. The side
hatches on the quarters are so situated that they can be left open in any kind of
weather. Then she has, on the deck below, capacity in the shape of cargo ports
for thi'owing the whole side open. There are also ventilators in the aft part of the
ship — one of 34 inches, and 3 of about 14 inches. She is well supplied with wind-
sails — two 3 feet in diameter, and one of 3 feet. There are no bulkheads in the
.cargo space on the steerage deck, and therefore there is free passage for currents of
air. There are on this deck deadhead lights of about 10 inches, which can be opened
in fair weather. The cargo ports above referred to may be opened when the
vessel is lying in port, and give perfect ventilation in the steerage deck, and the
upper portion can be opened at sea in smooth weather.

Table showing economy in the consumption of coal, steamship Newport,



Knots.


Tons per
day.


10.2
10.96
10.27
11.33
10.10
10.3


28.8

30

32

27

28

20


63.16
10,52


163.8
27.6



Average; Knots, 10.52; consumption, 27.1



738 OOEEESPONDENCE.

U. S. S. MomCAJ^ (3d Rate),
Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, July 6, 1S98. (Received July 21, 1898.)
Sir: Two army stragglers from the second expedition to Manila received on
board this vessel for rations liave this day been transferred to the troopship
Indiana.

"Very respectfTilly, G. M. Book,

Commander, XJ. S. Navy, Cormnanding,
The Seceetary op the Navy,

Navy Department, Washington, D. C.



Department of State, Washington, July Si, 1898.
Tlie Secretary op "War.

Sir: I have the honor to apprise you of the receipt of a telegram from Mr.
Rounsevelle Wildman, consul-general of the United States at Hongkong, China^
reading as follows:

" Consulate-General of the United States,
" Hongkong, July SI, 1898. (Received 6.33 a. m.)
"Day, Washington:
" Second expedition arrived Manila Sunday. Monterey not arrived.

""WlLDMAN.""

A copy of this telegram has been given to the Secretary of the Navy.
Respectfully, yours,

William R. Day.



Navy Department, Washington, July 21, 1898,

memorandum for the war department.

The following telegram received to-day from Admiral Dewey:

"Cavite, July 17.
" Situation unchanged. Second army detachment arrived to-day. All well on
board. The health of the squadron continues good. No sickness whatever. In
view of information received, shall retain City of Pehin and China as auxiliaries-
Shall return other transports to the United States as soon as possible."

John D. Long, Secretary.



Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, July Si, 1893.
Maj. Gen. Henry C. Mereiam, ■

Commanding Dejjartment of California, San Francisco, Cat,
Sir: I have the honor to inform you that I have forwarded by to-day's mail, in
two mail bags, 1,200 copies of Customs Tariff and Regulations for the Philippine
Islands, addressed to Maj. Gen. Wesley Merritt, commanding Department of the
Pacific, Manila, Philippine Islands, in your care, which please cause to be safely
forwarded to General Merritt at the earliest practicable date, and inform this
of&ce of the date of shipment.

"V"ery respectfully, H. C. Corbin, Adjutant-General,

P. S. — The publication referred to is a confidential one.



AFFAIRS IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 739

Burlington, Iowa, July SI, 1S98.

(Received 8.47 p. m.)
Honorable Secretary of "War, Washington, D. C:

Not one Iowa regiment mentioned in any expedition against Spaniards. Spe-
cial demands in this State for assignment of Fifty -first Iowa to next expedition to
Manila. Sncli orders would give great satisfaction in State.

John Gear.



Camp Merritt, San Francisco, Col.. July. 16, 1898.

(Received July 22, 1898.)
Hon. R. A. Alger, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C.

Sir: As per telegram this day sent, I hereby make application for permission
to rejoin my regiment, the Tenth Pennsylvania Infantry, U. S. Volunteers, at
Manila.

I have here 248 recruits which I have organized into a provisional battalion under
command of Lieut. C. C. Crowell. Their equipment and drill will proceed as
satisfactorily as if I were present, and consequently I feel that my duty lies with,
my regiment.

I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant,

James E. Barnett,
Lieutenant Colonel Tenth Pennsylvania U. S. Volunteers,.



ToPEKA, Kans., JulySS, 1898,

(Received 12.16 p. m.)
Honorable Secretary of War, Washington, D. C:

Twentieth Kansas disappointed at not being sent to Manila. Say California
and Iowa assigned ahead of them. They are as well drilled and as efficient as other
regiments. The people of Kansas would be pleased to have yon look into this mat-
ter and send the Kansas regiment in its turn.

Charles Curtis..



Department op State,

Washington, July 22, 1898.
The Honorable, the Secretary of War.

Sir : Referring to my letter of the 14th instant, inclosing a copy of a dispatch
from our minister to Hawaii, in which he called attention to the urgent necessity
of providing for officers and men of the expeditionary forces sent to the Philip-
pines, who have been or may be left behind at Honolulu, I have the honor to
inclose herewith, for your information, a copy of a dispatch from^ the minister
reporting the action taken by Major-General Merritt to meet the emergencies set
forth in the minister's earlier dispatch.

Respectfully, yours, William R. Day.

[Inclosure : From Mr. Sewall, No. 180, July 8, IS9S.]

No. 180.] Legation of the United States,

Honolulu, July S, 1898.
Hon. W. R. Day, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Sir: Referring to my dispatch No. 176, of June 28, 1 have the honor to report
that having called the attention of Major-General Merritt to the needs it presents,
he at once took steps to provide for tliem. Funds vnll be furnished for the care



740 OOERESPOlsrDENCE.

of tlie sict left here, and arrangenienta have been effected for the establishment
of a Q-overnment hospital here, which -will be in operation so soon as a building
■which has been leased can receive necessary alterations, and the equipment of
supplies and medical staff can be brought here.

The Red Cross Society will continue its work to the extent of its powers.
I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

Harold M. Sewall.



Department of State,

Washington, July 22, 1898.
The Honorable, the Secretary op War.

Sir: I have the honor to inclose herewith for your information copies of dis-
patches from our minister at Honolulu, reporting the arrival at that place on the
5th-7th instant of the third expeditionary force of American troops sent to the
Philippines.

Respectfully, yours, "William R. Day.

[Inclosurea: From minister to Hawaii, Nos. 181 and 183, of July 8, 1898.]

2^0. 181.] Legation of the United States,

Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, July 8, 1898.
Hon. W. R. Day, Secretary of State, Washington, D. C.

Sir: I have the honor to report that the United States troop ships Ohio and the
City of Para, of the third expedition to the Philippines, arrived here on the 5th
instant, the Morgan City and the Indiana the 6th, and the Newport and Valencia
the 7th instant.

The troops of this expedition have been received with the same hospitality that
has been so generously extended to the previous expeditions.

After taking on 1 ,812^ tons of coal, the ships left the harbor at noon. To-night
they have returned, two of them within the harbor, the Indiana being in tow.
I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

Harold M. Sewall.



No. 183.] Legation of the United States,

Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands, July 8, 1898.
Hon. W. R. Day, Secretary of State.

Sir: Referring to my dispatch No. 181, of to-day's date, I have the the honor to
report that the United States steamer transport Neujport did not return with the
other transports, but has continued on her course.

General JMerritt informed me yesterday that it was his intention to proceed with
the Newport at good speed and overtake the Monterey; and this is, I believe, what
he has done.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

Harold M. Sewall.



San Francisco, Cal., July 25, 1S98.

(Received 10.18 p. m.)
General Corbin, Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C:

Secretary of War has intimated Seventh Regiment California Volunteers, that
have been in camp since first of May, can be sent in next expedition to Manila.
May I venture to urge you to kindly expedite the detail, and thereby favor a
eplendid regiment of soldiers.

Geo. C. Perkins.



AFFAIRS IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. 741

Los Angeles, Cal., July 26, 1898.

(Received 8.16 p. m.)
Ad-jt. Gen. H. C. Coebin, Washington, D. C:

Much, feeling with reference to Seventh Regiment, now at San Francisco; criti-
cisms extend outside military circles. If possible, kindly aid in procuring per-
mission to sail.

Stephen M. White.



Adjutant-General's Office,
Washington, July S6, 1898—11.15 p. m.
General Merriam, San Francisco, Cal.:

There is great pressure being brought to bear upon tbe Department for the sbix)-
ment of the Seventh California to the Philippines. Secretary of War would be
glad, if yon can do so with due regard to the rights of others and plans already
made, to hasten the departure of this regiment.

H. C. CORBiN, Adjutant-General.



Quartermaster-General's Office,

Washington, July 27, 1898.
Brig. Gen. H. C. Corbin.

Sir: Referring to attached communication from General Merritt respecting tho
steamer Newport, I have the honor to .state that steps have been taken to ascer-
tain the price at which this ship can be purchased; that such price is so much in
excess of her intrinsic value that it would not be advantageous for the Govern-
ment to purchase her. She is now chartered at a price of $1,000 per day and
General Merritt can retain her as long as may be absolutely necessary, but it is
hoped that two ships recently purchased by the Government, the Scandia and Ari-
zona, will give General Merritt adequate transportation facilities for the perma-
nent use of the expedition in carrying troops to and from the outlying islands.
Yotirs, respectfully,

Frank J. Hecker,
Colonel and Quartermaster Volunteers, Chief of Transportation,



San Francisco, Cal., July 27, 1898.

(Received 3.08 p.m.)
Adjutant-General Corbin, Washington, D. C:

Referring to your telegram regarding Seventh California, I found expedition-
ary camp here filled with odd detachments of recruits and battalions of broken
regiments. My selections for embarkation are made with a view of restoring
organization as a matter of first importance. As shipments continue the Seventh
California can take precedence if desired.

Merriam, Major-General.



Adjutant-General's Office,
Washington, July 37, 1898— 3.30 p. m.
General Merriam, San Francisco, Gal.:

As shipments continue, Secretary War desires that the Seventh California be
given precedence as far as can be done without interfering with arrangements
you have already made,

H. C. CoEBiK, Adjutant-General.
W S — VOL 2 8



742 CORRESPONDENCE.

Adjutaj^t-General's Office,

Washington, July S7, 1S08.
General Mekriam, San Francisco, Cat.:

Secretary of War desires ■bo report as to whether Lieut. Col. James E. Bamett,
Tenth Regiment, Pennsylvania Volunteers, at Camp Merritt, in charge of recmits
for his regiment, has been sent to Join his regiment.

H. C. CORBIN, Adjuiant-Oeneral.



San Francisco, Cal., July S7, 1898.

(Received 7.81 p. m.)
Adjutant-General Corbin, Washington, D. C:

Replying to your telegram this date, Lieut. Col. James E. Bamett, Tenth Penn-
sylvania, is stiU on duty at Camp Merritt.

Merriam, General,



Adjutant-General's Office,

Washi7igton, July S9, 1898.
The Commanding General, Eighth Army Corps

AND Department of the Pacific.
(Via San Francisco, Cal.)
SiB: Referring to your communication of the 6th instant, suggesting the steamer
Newport as a vessel admirably adapted for one of the permanent fleet of trans-
ports, the Secretary of War desires me to inform you that steps have been taken
to ascertain the price at which this ship can he purchased; that such price is ao
much in excess of her intrinsic value that it would not be advantageous for the
Government to purchase her; and that she is now chartered at a price of §1,000
per day, and you can retain her as long as may be absolutely necessary, but it la



Online LibraryUnited States. Adjutant-General's OfficeCorrespondence relating to the war with Spain and conditions growing out of the same, including the insurrection in the Philippine Islands and the China relief expedition, between the adjutant-general of the army and military commanders in the United States, Cuba, Porto Rico, China, and the Philippi → online text (page 12 of 113)