Copyright
United States. Army. Corps of Engineers. New Engla.

Seasonal monitoring cruise at the Western Long Island Sound Disposal Site, August 1986 online

. (page 3 of 4)
Online LibraryUnited States. Army. Corps of Engineers. New EnglaSeasonal monitoring cruise at the Western Long Island Sound Disposal Site, August 1986 → online text (page 3 of 4)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Nephtys were below the analytical detection limits for all but
two samples. In both cases the measured concentrations were
Aroclor 1254 in organisms collected from the Reference station.
The levels measured were 420 and 620 ppb dry weight. These
levels are slightly higher than those measured by Munns et al .
(in preparation) in Nephtys from their Reference station at CLIS
(186-375 ppb) .

It is somewhat surprising to see measurable PCB
concentrations in the Reference organisms and not in those
collected from the WLIS-A station. This would not be expected
because the sediment PCB results showed a level of 9 ppb at the
Reference station and 500 ppb at WLIS-A (Table 3-1) . In all
cases, the measured wet weight concentrations for mercury (Table
3-7) and PCBs (Table 3-8) are well below the FDA Alert Levels
(0.2 ppm for mercury, 2 ppm for PCB's).

5.0 CONCLUSIONS

The results of the analysis of the bathymetric data
collected at the WLIS Disposal Site indicates an accumulation of
sediment (estimated from bathymetry surveys to be approximately
35,700 m 3 ) in the vicinity of the disposal buoy. Comparison of
the contoured bathymetric charts from the October 1985 and the
August 1986 surveys reveals a decrease in depth at the buoy
location and on the west flank of mound "C" and the northeast
flank of mound "A". Because of the buoy's position between the
two mounds, the deposited dredged material will tend to create a
single, wide flat mound. This may, in fact, aid in stabilizing
the dredged material. The peaks of dredged material mounds are
usually the site of any initial erosion that may occur.



17



The REMOTS® survey showed that recently deposited
dredged material was evident in the area of disposal point "C",
supporting the results of the bathymetric survey. Much of this
newly deposited dredged material consists of coarse-grained
sediments (fine to medium sands) . This material may extend
somewhat beyond the survey area to the east and northeast.
However, given that the survey area is approximately 1600 meters
west and 900 meters south of the Disposal Site boundaries, it is
highly unlikely that this material extends out of the disposal
site. Lower contrast dredged material layers were evident in the
western portion of the survey area apparently representing
material deposited a number of years ago. Apparent relict
dredged material is observed in some replicates from the WLIS
Reference station. This material is clearly relict (deposited
more than just a few years ago) based on its extremely low
reflectance and discontinuous layering. Relict dredged material
has been observed at this station since the initiation of REMOTS
surveys in 1984. The reference station is located close to an
historically-used disposal site (Eatons Neck) . There is no
evidence that recent disposal activities have occurred at this
location.

Although limited benthic recolonization of the survey
area had occurred since the August 1985 survey, the area
continued to exhibit a "stressed" biological community. The
highly disturbed WLIS Reference community indicated that this
stress was not directly related to disposal activities, but
reflected a regional ecosystem disturbance factor, i.e., bottom
hypoxia.

Statistical analyses of the chemical data collected for
the sediment at WLIS indicated that the concentrations of lead,
nickel, copper, and oil and grease were elevated in the WLIS-A
sediment compared to the levels at the Reference station. The
concentrations of nickel and copper are, however, only slightly
elevated in the dredged material and are within the range of
concentrations reported by other investigators for central and
western Long Island Sound. The lead concentrations at WLIS-A
are, however, elevated compared to what other investigators have
found. These same four elements exhibited elevated
concentrations in the top 2 cm of the sediment cores when
compared to the remaining 2-10 cm for both the disposal mound and
Reference station. The reason for only these elements to be
elevated is unknown, but more sampling would be required to
determine the actual chemical and physical processes occurring in
the sediment. In addition to the above elements, the PCB
concentration appeared to be high in the WLIS-A sample.

For the concentrations of metals in the body tissue of
Nephtys . only the concentration of lead was significantly higher
in Nephtys collected from WLIS-A compared to levels in organisms
collected from the Reference station. This is consistent with

18



significantly elevated levels of lead in the WLIS-A sediment.
The concentrations of mercury were well below the FDA Alert
Level .

In summary, the results of the present survey indicates
that the management controls over dredged material disposal at
WLIS, initiated by New England Division, Corps of Engineers, have
been effective in minimizing the dispersion of dredged material
and preventing any significant adverse environmental impacts.
Distinct disposal mounds have been formed by disposal operations
occurring at taut-moored buoys and appear to be stable with no
evidence of erosion or significant transport of material. The
"stressed" condition at the disposal site is not attributible to
disposal operations but rather to conditions in Western Long
Island Sound in general.

6 . RECOMMENDATIONS

The DAMOS monitoring protocol for disposal sites in
Long Island Sound depends on comparing disposal site conditions
with an appropriate reference, i.e., a nearby area of seafloor
which is not affected by the disposal events. The WLIS Reference
station was clearly more stressed than the survey area. The
reason for this may be low bottom water oxygen. However, it is
not clear why the Reference station, located only 2 km east of
the survey area, should have been more oxygen stressed. Future
monitoring should include some near-bottom oxygen monitoring and
an additional reference station should be located to document how
widespread are the changes measured at the present one. This may
not be possible for this area of the Sound because the study done
for EPA Region I has shown that low oxygen water exists at depths
of 50 feet or more throughout this area in August. While
year-to-year variations may be present in bottom water oxygen,
extended periods of low oxygen tensions in the range measured can
seriously compromise the benthic habitat throughout the whole
region. In short, a relatively undisturbed Reference site may
not exist in the vicinity of the disposal site.

7 . REFERENCES

Benninger, L.K., R.C. Aller, J.K. Cochran and K.K. Turekian.
1979. Effects of biological sediment mixing on the 210 Pb
chronology and trace metal distribution in a Long Island
Sound sediment core. Earth and Planetary Science Letters
43:241-259.

Bokuniewicz, H.J., Gebert, J. A., and R.B. Gordon. 1980.
Consolidation of a rapidly emplaced deposit of estuarine
sediment. Unpublished report, 42p.



19



Greig, R.A. , R.N. Reid and D. R. Wenzloff. 1977. Trace metal
concentrations in sediments from Long Island Sound. Marine
Pollution Bulletin 8: 183-188.

Munns, W.R. , Jr., J.F. Paul, F.J. Bierman, Jr., W.R. Davis, W.B.
Galloway, G.L. Hoffman, R.R. Payne, P.F. Rogerson and R.J.
Pruell. (in preparation) . Exposure assessment component of
the Field Verification Program: Data presentation and
synthesis. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, R.I.

Plumb, R.H. 1981. Procedures for Handling and Chemical Analysis
of Sediment and Water Samples. Technical Report EPA/CE-81-
1.

Tavalaro, J.F. 1983. Sediment Budget Study for Clamshell
Dredging and Disposal Activities. US Army Corps of
Engineers, New York District. New York, NY.

SAIC. 1985. DAMOS Annual Report. SAIC Report #84/752 1&C46 , US
Army Corps of Engineers, New England Division, Waltham, MA.
DAMOS Contribution #4 6.

SAIC. 1986a. Seasonal Monitoring Cruise at the New London
Disposal Site, July 1986. SAIC Report #86/7540&C60 , US
Army Corps of Engineers, New England Division, Waltham, MA.
DAMOS Contribution #60.

SAIC. 1986b. Monitoring Surveys at the Western Long Island Sound
Disposal Site, August and October 1985. SAIC Report
#86/7510&C55 , US Army Corps of Engineers, New England
Division, Waltham, MA. DAMOS Contribution #55.

SAIC. 1987. REMOTS® reconnaissance mapping of near-bottom
dissolved oxygen: Central to western Long Island Sound,
August 1986. SAIC Report #87/7502&132 . US Environmental
Protection Agency, Region I, Boston, MA.



20



+



+



+



+



CJ



Ul



s

— cri



+



+



CO

c

3
O
CD



4 < < < < < <



oa



< < < < < < <






4 < < < < 4 4



LD
OO

I
CD



^ CM



CO



in



<6



+



f



T






H





O


LU


2


tn


w


-H


«


u



CJ

u

3

Cn

•H

fa



073 29.500H



073 29.250N



073 29.000H



073 28.750W



WLIS AUGUST 1986

i

Western Boundary



+



-40 59.250n[-



Figure 3-1. Contoured bathymetric
chart of WLIS, August
1986. Depth in meters.



50 100 150 200 250 300 350
Meters




073 29.500H
I



073 29.250H



073 29.000H



-j— 40 59.500N-



+



073 28.750H
_J



40 59.250N-



WLIS 10-30-85



073 29.500V
1



073 29.250V



073 2a CB0V



■59.500N



■59.2S0N



Western Boundary




Figure 3-2. Contoured bathymetric chart of WLIS, October 1985.

Depth in meters.



50 180 150 200 250 300 350

Meters

073 29. 750V



073 29.500V



15 073 29.250V



073 29. COflV



.500N-



.250N-



+



+



+



C5




+



+



RJ-



< < <



O
00



< ^ <



<3 < 4



< < <



4-



' +



*-« OJ



CO



in







CJD

CO

I

en



O I —
—) —



+



i

si

i



+



+



< 03 < 2 <J s <



CS



: +



4 en <



to <| w






< w < W «



03 «



Ui



CO



+



^ 03 < S <j



< 03 < 03 <



< 03 < 03 <



<J 03 < M <

03



+



+



+ '



^ M CO



in (0



OO

I
CD



+



.8$




Figure 3-5. A REMOTS image from station 4-G showing both

suface and subsurface sand layers. Also, note
the caridean shrimp to the right at the interface.
Scale: Actual width of frame = 15.2cm.



+



10


rt 01




in o.




-H


ID


fc C


-P


0> ro


10


4J J3


E


>0 -P




E C


n


U


o>


0) 0) -H


tn u


&M 4J


■v <u


TJ O


01 >i


III H Ij


u m


U JZ +J


Q -H


D jj 01



O 10 —I 10



G. E a, E



+



C5



-f







a, < a<< a 4 Q <



s



LU



a < a <



+ .



+



fiO



'+



-f«



KT



^H <N



CO



1A



to



ao =
i §



+



i







Figure 3-7. A REMOTS image from station 5-E showing a low-

reflectance dredged material layer overlying a
high-reflectance pre-disposal interface (arrow).
Also note the patches of reduced (dark) sediment
at the interface. Scale: Actual width of frame = 15.2cm.



o



> w

'-+ i



+



+



+



K 4 « 4



CO



+ **



-t*



^H CM CO



in <0



QJ



+




Figure 3-9. A REMOTS image from station 5-F showing reduced

(dark) sediment patches at the interface. These
features are indicative of recent bottom disturbance.
Scale: Actual width of frame = 15.2cm.





Figure 3-10. A REMOTS image from station 3-D showing

a methane gas pocket at depth in sediment (arrow).
Scale: Actual width of frame = 15.2cm.




WLIS
AUGUST 1986



N = 63



0.4 0.B 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2

BOUNDARY ROUGHNESS (CM)



WLIS REF
AUGUST 1986



N = 20




0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 3.2 3.6 4.0 4.4 4.8 5.2

BOUNDARY ROUGHNESS (CM)



Figure 3-11. Frequency distributions of boundary roughness
values at WLIS and WLIS reference.



WLIS
AUGUST 1986




12 3 4 5
MEAN RPD DEPTH (CM)



264-



F 15+
R



16 -



5 -



ULIS REF
AUGUST 1986




N = 28



MEAN RPD DEPTH (CM)



Figure 3-12 • Frequency distributions of mean RPD depths
at WLIS and WLIS reference.



+



+



o



00



CO

I
en




^ CM



CO



in



(^



i



o

QJ



53



+



+



CJ



Ul



GO




** <M O



CO g



m







+



OJ







t_(


0) 11








Cn cn




H




nj nj








•y -u


()


ai


B>


CO 05


■H


CP


m







ra


4J




N


■P


05




<


CO


1


H



WLIS
AUGUST 1986




■2-10 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 16 11
ORGANISM SEDIMENT INDEX




WLIS REF
AUGUST 1986



N = 20



M*



■S -7 -6 -5 -4 -3 -2 -1 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

ORGANISM SEDIMENT INDEX UALUE



Figure 3-15. The frequency distribution and Organism-
Sediment Index values at WLIS and WLIS reference.



+



+



o



■+



n . vo



o



+



^^ r-j



Ul « < S <



+



m o O

< < <J 4



r~ x *



< >- 4 < 4



'+



•0 -d I < 4



+



CO fe
I S

cn 2



^ CM



PO



m



<o



+



i



QJ

,55*



l

ro

0)

D
Cn
■H









U
3
WD



2i3


L6


fes


c

•H 5J
-P g

T3


8 i


8 i


<







•H O
-P O






5 a

-H —

1i



1



I

N
■H

•H

s



-H T3 g| O

h-h a

W IS H H




$u



(N U

(N OJ °
fs) O

- O

-On

U o CM

o o

O IT) ••

H f~ Q)

rH N

>• S 8

£6£



15



a a



W n



££









3



& fi





&



n
d



■so



&,





a 8 b s fl



"tf «tf CO a\


i-H CM CTi


r- o c-i


VO VO ID in


VD • •


r» H CTi


H rH i-H H


rH CO i-H


H



-p

.e

CP
- H
Q)

>i
U
T)

tr>

IT

3



17



i i
i i



i i
i i



i i
i i



rH O

in vo

0) o o II

Cn • • ll

o o



I I

I I



I I
I I



I I
I I



I I
I I



I I
I I



I I
I I



I I
I I



I I
I I



I I
I I





S g






a a






c c






o o




o






H


u


5-1




Q<


Id


id


CH


e


■P


4->


<c a


id


•H


-H


CD Ph


w


eu


a,


a «



o o

in in



co n



o o

CM CM






CTi CTi



I I
I I



f> o



vo


in


CM


o


CM






CO


CN








CO CO


cm






o


O


• <H


H


01


CO


rH


H


H



VD


H


r-t


O


CM


O


CO CT\


o cm in


r>


CO


CM (M


r> o •



o o o o



I-> rl ^ tO


o in cn


tr\ cn co co


o • •


rH rH H rH


<h in CM



in vo a\ cm


co h r»


H O tTl rl


o • •


^ <f P1<f


sr r- h



t co in h

CO rH CTi CM



CM <N CM CM



CM


CM






i-l cm cn


H i-l






issue-


CN CM






E-i


s a






54


Q Q






CD
4-1


c c






in









Si



u


54






h4


(0


(0


c






4-'


4->


(0


Q


U


•H


•H


a)


cu


05


P<


a,


s «


3



cm vo in



n co oi m


vo r- cm


• • • •


. If) .


in in ^ vo


in • cm


CM CM CM CM


CM O



rH VO VO VO


r» co "*


• • • •


• H •


in r-» r- vo


VO • <*


CM CM CM CM


CM H



>

a)

Q


C 'CM

(CHQ
(D 4-> CO

a w a;











id


•>* o


co






id


O CM


cti






C


rH








id
u

VW



O










n vo








H


n o


rH

CTi






■H
U


o o








c




u

A



VO H


CM






54


CO H


O






id


rH


rH






ai

10

a)

rH

id


CTi CM


n






c


CO CM


CTN









■^








•rH

id

s

a>


■^ vo


O
O






4-1


CM O


rH






XJ

73
(1)
4->


co rH


r^






3
X2


VO CM


CTi






•rH


CM








54








C 4-1






C





W









•H


•rH






-H


4-1 73






4-1


id




VO CM




(0


•H


r-i


• •


CO


■H


>


id


"tf CM


o


>


CD


•H


CM


rH


a)

Q


Q


54

CD
4-1






4-1


54


id






c


(0


e






a)


73




W







C


0)


<D




54


10


u


3




0)


4-1


c


r-i




CU


CO


<D


(0








>H


>




0)


CD


<D






>


>


4H


-o




•H


•H


<D


U




4-1


4->


54


tf




(0


id




s




H HT3




>1


0)


<D


CD


T! •


54


« K


•H


Q) >


0)






MH


-H CD


>


II


II


■rH


<»H Q









4J


•H


u


Q


a


U


4-> •


d)


CU


CO


<D


54 73 «


« «


0) 4->










U W o\o


H


N


-0



ON
H

-P
IQ

3



(0


to




to


•H







w




a io




w


XI




■H






Q


-p

43




to


CT


0)

u

c

0)


H


-H


J


QJ


12


?


Le 3-1

ted at


>1
(-1

(0


u

0)

0)

K


3 °


c




(3 <»







^ rH


w







c




u


o

•H




p -p




c


ro




Q)


p




g -P




•H


c




T3


Q)




0)







to


c






4-1


u







w




W






-rH






w






>1






rH






(C






c






<c






H






(0













-H






g






Q)






si






u







> o

•p
w

+1



I



a



a



QJ

-p

rO
O
-H

rH

a



• f h •


CO


+1


O (N H H


VO H


O


+1 +1 +1 +1


+1 +1


o


H ^f W <t


01 O





• VO ON •


oo co


n



• tj< CN •


VO


o cm in o


in rH


+i +i +i +i


+i +i


(M CPi H <H


r- Tt



onr^nnMO^o



IT) N N VD
• IT) CO •



r> w o

CM (M CTi
V CN



s







o


•p


ON CN O CO VO CO VO O


p


• in o • on co co cn o





H <H CO V VO


n


m



CNir^ocococNvovoo

• co vo • v in •■a- cm on

o H co v cn



a















co








o


p


in <H O H




r>


CN


VO O


p


O G\ H •


in


m


^


CN) O





H CN








V CN


a


O








m

o
o


a


cn c^ o o


ro


og


ON


VO O


o


• 0"! CO •


V


>*


in


cm r>


H


<h h in








V CN]



ggggggggg

aaaaaaaaa

CJ3 CBlt) ri3'H I)



co oo *^

co O O r~ vo

. . . • o

O O O «3< rH

+1 +1 +1 +1 +1

CO CN] VO O VO

ON VO rH .in

• •••>* H

rH O O H



vo rH o o in



O O O CM rH

+1 +1 +1 +1 +1

on CN) rH vo in

rH VO CN] • «*

• • • CM CN]

CO O O rH



VO O rH r^

VD VO rH • O

• • • O CO

rH O O rH



CM CN) VO CO

in in H • r^

. • • O CO

CO O O H



CO VO Ol CO H
01 VO rH • rH



<H O O rH



CO ON] rH LT> «tf



T VO


CM


CO


CM






0]

c




CN O


O


H









-H

P



<D

w




H H


CO


-*


r>






0)


.


CO VO


rH





r>






p


0)


• •





ON


CM









p


CN] O


o


rH












• u

QJ


CO rH


in


o


ro






<U


P <h


in r»


CM





r-






C





• •





^r


ro






•H





CO O


o


rH






c

ro


X!
g
O

u


[fl


p

Hh QJ
TS

c

g-H

ro

g

CM <D
P








g




3


•H


a


C


c




a







w


O II


QJ


a>




Qm


£1


>1p


c oi cp






g


P rH


g





o




a>


a,




ro


II


X! rH


u




w


a


P


C


p


u n


p




fO




0)


(0


ap


CO >i


-H




0)


CQ


a







o X


2H


P


u




(1)


Eh CQ






P


o


(^


in


rH




• •





a






p


tr




p p


p


a,ca


p


C


• •





O






fO


ro


•H


QJ


Eh Eh


Eh


Q


rH


P


cu


CO


P






O


-H












o\° o\°


o\<>


u


o


Eh


rH CM


£





o














o


o\


o


in






rH






VO








o


CM


CM


o


ro


B


.




LO





CM


m




in











CO o


^


o


1


M


o


rH


H


1


in


O


o


o


tT M


• -P


+1


1


+1


+1


+1


+l


1


+i


+1


+1


+l


+1 +1


> -P


r-


1


m


o


o


in


1


o


n


CO


n


rH Cft


%z


o




rH


IT)


"*


r~




o

*3"


co

(M


in
o


CN

O


rH «rj<


13
















CM










■P


























W


























^ - *


r^














o


ro


in


n






o






CO








o


in


o


O


in


c




CM


O









CM


in








r- eft


(0 Q


H


m


VO


CM


^r


co


H


r-t


o


o


o


CM H





+1


+i


+1


+1


+i


+i


+ 1


+i


+i


+1


+1


+i +i


£ H


r-


n





CO


rH


CM


CM


o


o


0>


CM


** o




H


m

cm


H

(M


in


ID


O
H


in


o


r>


in


CM


H CM



B







o


■P


cj\oom n m oi o


-P


nvorH • co in co cm o





• H cm in o


n


o co




o




moom -d-o^o


ft


vo cm rH • co inn >* o


o


• CM CM tJ> rH TJ"


H


O CM



B



















o


+J


in o o h


co


CO


VO O


P


tt ct\ r-~ • in


CO


r^


CM O





• <h h in






v in


aa


o






CM

o
o


Q


•^ o o co n


r>


in


VO O


§


• r-i \o • V
CM CM rH CO


^


o\


CM



a



a)



co in o "*


m


o


■^ VD O


in cm -n- •


V


m


VO CM O


• V H "*






v a\


O






rH

o


CM O O O




rH


o in o


^ r~ co •


CO


in


OIBO


• CM CM O






rH VO



EEEEEEEEE

0>J3 C WO ri 3-H m



<o cri a\ in o
h r^ cm «* in



o VO VO VO o
rH in CM CM o



«* r- H n o

vd ^ cm n cr>

...HO
CM O O rH



O *3" o «* o



H VO


CN


rH


in






in

c




f*> O


O




rH







•H
4->

u
in




CTi CTt


CT\


r^


CO






Q)


.


VO -c^


rH





O






P


0)


. .





in


in









Sh


CM O


o


in










T3



O


H VO


O


rH


o






(1)


(1) <4H


en in


CN


H


VO






c


P


• .





rH


<*






•H





CM O


O




rH






X

E
O

u


p
0)

«h t3
O C

•H












-O <»H


E m












C


o


E












ra




CM <D












(/I


in


p








B




3


■H


ft


c


c




a







in


O II


a)


a)




JTJM


XI


>lEH


C LT Cn






B


-p


rH


E





o




OJ


a




rd


II


XI >H


u




w


a-


P


C


4->


P T3


■p




cd




a)


cd


&P


fO >i-H




(l)


CQ


a




O


O K


ZH


P


U




a)


Eh CO






4->


O


Oi


in


H




. .





a.






4->


o->




P P


■P


a,^


rH


P


c


• •


O









cd


<C


■H


a)


Eh Eh Eh


Q


rH -P


Hi


CO


-P






O


•H












o\° o\°


o\<>


u


O


H


H CM


s



Table 3-2

Physical Characteristics of Sediment from the Biological Samples
WLIS Disposal Site, August 1986



Station-Rep Coarse



Med.
Sand



Fine
Sand



Silt/
Clay



WLIS-REF-1



-2



-3



-4



-5



11



93



87



91



80



87



Dark olive gray
organic clay (OH) with
shell fragments
Dark olive
organic clay (OH)
shell fragments
Dark olive
organic clay (OH)
shell fragments
Dark olive
organic clay (OH)



gray

with

gray
with

gray
with

sand and shell
fragments

Dark olive gray
organic clay (OH) with
shell fragments



WLIS-A -1



-2



-3



-4



17



15



36



14



26



32



30



41



32



38



30



42



25



15



Dark gray silty sand
( SM) with shell
fragments



Dark olive


gray


silty


sand (SM)


with


shell


fragments






Dark gra


y P


oor ly


graded sand


with


gravel (SP)






Dark gra


y p


oo r 1 y


graded sand


(SP)





-5 15 21 36 18 Dark gray silty sand

( SM) with shel 1
fragments



Table 3-4

Benthic Community Analysis of Sediment Collected at WLIS,

August 198 6



SPECIES

CNIDARIA

Ceriantheopsis americanus

RHYNCHOCOELA
Cerebratulus lacteus
Tubulanus pellucidus
Rhychocoela ST

PHORONIDA
Phoronis mulleri

ANNELIDA
Oligochaeta spp.

Polychaeta
Ampharetidae
Ampharete arctica
Amphitrite ornata
Asabellides oculata

Capitellidae
Mediomastus ambiseta

Chaetopteridae
Spiochaetopterus oculatus

Cirratulidae
Tharyx acutus
Cossura longocirrata

Flabelligeridae
Pherusa af finis

Glyceridae
Glycera americana

Hesionidae
Podarke obscura

Maldanidae
Asychis elonqata
Euclvmene torquata
Euclvmene zonalis



WLIS-A
CENTER
12 4



3
12

1



12 21 17



74
7



92 42
1



910 1020 307



62 75 159



14 42 43



11



REFERENCE
1 4 3



1 3

Online LibraryUnited States. Army. Corps of Engineers. New EnglaSeasonal monitoring cruise at the Western Long Island Sound Disposal Site, August 1986 → online text (page 3 of 4)