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United States. Army. Ordnance Dept.

Description of the wind component indicator. Mechanical features, method of assembling and dismounting, and rules governing its care and preservation in service ... July 15, 1906 online

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Online LibraryUnited States. Army. Ordnance DeptDescription of the wind component indicator. Mechanical features, method of assembling and dismounting, and rules governing its care and preservation in service ... July 15, 1906 → online text (page 1 of 1)
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No. 1794



DESCRIPTION



OF THE



WIND COMPONENT INDICATOR



MECHANICAL FEATURES, METHODS OF ASSEMBLING AND

DISMOUNTING, AND RULES GOVERNING ITS CARE

AND PRESERVATION IN SERVICE



{ONE PLATE)



JULY 15, 1906
REVISED MARCH 23, 1908




WASHINGTON

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1917



No. 1794



DESCRIPTION



OF THE



WIND COMPONENT INDICATOR



MECHANICAL FEATURES, METHODS OF ASSEMBLING AND

DISMOUNTING, AND RULES GOVERNING ITS CARE

AND PRESERVATION IN SERVICE



{ONE PLATE)



1 1, t. O^A



VI



JULY 15, 1906
REVISED MARCH 23, 1903




WASHINGTON
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1917



\V1



Wak Department,
Office of the Chief of Ordnance,

Washington, May 23, 1912.
This manual is published for the information and government of the Regular
Army and Organized Militia of the United States.
By order of the Secretary of War :

Williaai Ckoziek,
Brigadier General, Chief of Ordnance.

10048—17 (3)



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THE WIND COMPONENT INDICATOR.



DESCRIPTION.

1. The wind component indicator consists of a dial (2F). for read-
ing- range and deflection wind components. It is made of bronze, and
on its face are engraved reference numbers for range and deflection
components. The lines on the face of the dial are alternately heavy
and light; the heavy lines passing at right angles through the center
of the dial (2F) are the axes of the dial. The range component ref-
erence numbers are engraved along the vertical axis, and the deflection
component reference numbers are engraved along the horizontal axis.
Each heavy line passes through a reference number, the value of
which is some multiple of 10. Each light line passes through a refer-
ence number the value of which is some odd multiple of 5. The
smallest reference number used with the scale is 0, the largest 100.
As shown on the plate, these reference numbers read from on the
left to 100 on the right, and from at the bottom to 100 at the top,
with 50 in the center.

2. The dial is intended to be held in a vertical position by means of
the bracket (2S), of bronze, which is fastened to the back of the dial
in such manner that the dial itself will not turn, and hence the figures
on it will always be right side up.

3. Around the dial is a wind azimuth ring (2D), of bronze, gradu-
ated and numbered clockwise every 5 degrees, and movable about the
dial; the dial and the wind azimuth ring are secured together by an
undercut seat in the dial, a projecting annular ring in the wind azi-
muth ring, three clamp plates (2T), and the clamping and guide plate
(2K), in such manner that, although allowing relative angular mo-
tion between the parts, they can not be dismounted without removing
the screws holding the clamp plates and the clamping and guide
pLate to the dial. At the bottom of the dial an azimuth pointer (2M)
is attached. By moving the wind azimuth ring, which has a knurled
edge for convenience in handling and setting, to any required degree
as indicated on the dial by the azimuth pointer, it may be clam-ped
securely in place for the desired setting by means of the dial clamp-
ing screw (2N).

4. Embracing both the dial and the wind azimuth ring and ro-
tating about an axle at the back of dial is the target arm (2H), of



bronze, beirl fo alicyr it to pass ove)- the dial clamping screw. The
azimuth index (2L) is screwed to one end of the target arm and the
target-arm scale (2J), of bronze, to the other. The latter is secured
to the center of the dial from the front by the pivot screw (•2A).
One of the clamping screws (2P), serves to clamp the end of the tar-
get arm, to which azimuth index is secured, in any desired position
about the wind azimuth ring. The other clamps the pointer (2Q),
of forged steel, which slides through a islot in a projecting lug near
the central end of the target-arm scale. By relieving the clamping
screw the pointer may be set for any velocity of wind from to 50
miles per hour, as indicated on the targ^-arm scale.

5. All exposed surfaces not subject to sliding friction are sand-
blasted. Figures, letters, and graduations are blackened. The place
of manufacture, date, serial number, and initials of the inspector
are engraved on the face of the dial.

CARE AND USE.

6. The instrunient should be kept clean and free from dust. Sur-
faces subject to sliding friction should be oiled when necessary with
clock oil.

7. The instrument is to be suspended from the ceiling of the chart
room immediately over the plotting board and facing the range and
deflection boards, so that the operators of these boards can readily see
the range and deflection components without leaving their stations.
In using the instrument, the operator first sets the pointer to the
velocity of the wind, and the wind azimuth ring to the azimuth of the
wind as obtained from the meterological station. He then keeps the
target arm set to the azimuth of the target, as indicated by the gun
arm of the plotting board, moving the target arm as the target moves.
Should the wind change in velocity or direction, he makes the neces-
sary changes in the position of the pointer or the wind azimuth ring.
The sharp end of the pointer, extending over the dial, indicates at
once the proper deflection and range components.

War Department,

Office of the Chief of Ordnance,

Washington, May 23, 1912.
July 15, 1906.
Revised March 23, 1908.
Form No. 1794.
Ed. Aug. 27-17—1,000.

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10048-




10048 — 17. (Face page 6.)






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Online LibraryUnited States. Army. Ordnance DeptDescription of the wind component indicator. Mechanical features, method of assembling and dismounting, and rules governing its care and preservation in service ... July 15, 1906 → online text (page 1 of 1)