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United States. Bureau of Insular Affairs.

A pronouncing gazetteer and geographical dictionary of the Philippine Islands, United States of America with maps, charts and illustrations online

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- -T^^BL^Cj' COIITEIvTS

The '^hilippine's Isla:ids-as a whole, .geogra-
phic, economic, natural resources, histori-
cal background, etc. Pp.

1- 182,

Manila and Vicinity Pp..

153-194

'^upoleinent Pp.

193- 264

Beographical Discussion of Provinces in
Alphabetical orderlttefer to Preface — P.. XXVI)..



TABLii 01^^ GCNTnIIT^

^Rj^si3 of.^j_3]_aj^^^s, prov. , etc. ?;

ilountains, .

iiivers ....

CLIil^^Tii . . (^tnosplieric pressure,

humidity, rains, winds, clouds,

""eas

Says & Harbors

iioads f Comrn. . .

Population (towns) (r^p. census, I887) 2^ - 63

Philippine people

Races

Languages d Religion

Dependent Islands

-C'lora 6: x^auna

Minerals t Mineral products

■^orests d Classes oT woods

Fruits

"/eights 6. Measures

Ti^LE CJ' DI'^T^iITCiiJG (Between Manila

and other joints)
HISTCRY (Us'^. military Ccc. c^. ^ov^tjl^l - I69
Natural Historv (Mamraals, ;3irds , Insects

^^dDtiles, etc.) I69 - 172

PHILIPPIME CHRCNOLCGY (1^19-1901) 173 - l82



. 3


- 7


7


- 9


11


- 12


.12


- 14


14


- 13


13-


16


1^


- 18


23


- 63


65


- 64


63


- 67


67


- 69


69


- 70


70


- 81


81


- 83


83


- 95


93


-93


126


- 128


128


- 131



I



fiAZETTEER OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.



<



A

PRONOUNCING GAZETTEER

AND

GEOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY

OF

THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS,

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

WITH

MAPS, CHARTS, AND ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE LAW OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS PASSED BY
CONGRESS AND APPROVED BY THE PRESIDENT JULY 1, 1902,

WITH A COMPIjETE INDEX. ...



PREPARED IN THE BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS,
WAR DEPARTMENT.

1902.

(Septemlier 30. 1902.)



WASHINGTON:

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1902.



A

PRONOUNCING GAZETTEER

AND

GEOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY

OF

THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS,

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

WITH

MAPS, CHARTS, AND ILLUSTRATIONS.



THE LAW OF CIVIL GOVERNMENT IN THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS PASSED BY
CONGRESS AND APPROVED BY THE PRESIDENT JULY 1, 1902,

WITH A COMPLETE IJ^DEX. - - .



PREPARED IN THE BUREAU OF INSULAR AFFAIRS,
WAR DEPARTMENT.

1902.

(September 30, 1902.)



WASHINGTON:

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1902.



->



"7



x^



^'



CON^TEI^TS.



Paga.

Introduction vii

Explanation of the orthography of names ix

Accentuation x

Key to pronunciation of names xi

Signs relating to orthoepy xii

Abbreviations xiii

Table of temperatures xiv

Table of measures of length xiv

Comparative scale of miles (nautical and statute) and meters xiv

Maps XV

Charts, coast and harbor xv

Illustrations xxiii

Glossarial index xxxi

Addenda: Post-offices in the Philippine archipelago, corrected to August 27,

1902 ^ XXXIX

Philippine Islands (archipelago), general description 1

Manila, municipality of 183

Supplement, containing latest information to time of going to jiress 195-209

The law of civil government in the Philippine Islands:

House Committee on Insular Affairs 211

Senate Committee on the Philippine Islands 211

Passage of the "Philippine bill" by Congress 211

"An act temporarily to provide for the administration of the affairs of

civil government in the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes" . . . 212

Proclamation of amnesty, July 4, 1902 239

Index to the statute of civil government in the Philippine Islands 243

Index 249

Official Pronouncing Gazetteer and Geographical Dictionary of the Philippine

Islands, A to Z 265



S5eS24



Il^TRODUCTIOlSr.



The great number of inquiries addressed to the War Department
from all parts of the United States calling for infoimation regarding
the Philippine Islands, has indicated that a printed compendium of
such information would ])e practically useful to the American people.
The present work is designed to furnish such information.

The standard literature relating to the Philippines at the time of
American occupation was generally confined to books in Spanish, Ger-
man, French, and Dutch, and largely of ancient date. The English
books were usuall}" translations, Admiralt}" surveys, trade statistics,
and consular reports. The hydrographic data contained in Spanish
and English charts and instructions and United States compilations
from the same, were limited to the requirements of navigators only.

In the compilations of this work not onl}" the existing literature but
all available reports from military, naval, and civil officers, giving
the o])servations and results of campaigns, expeditions, reconnais-
sances, etc., have been consulted. When this data was collected bv
provinces it was submitted to officers returning from the Philippine
Islands to make corrections and additions from their personal knowl-
edge and experience. Their replies were universally commendatory
of the character and scope of the work and of its value for ready refer-
erence. In many instances their replies were accompanied by new
material which w^as incorporated in the text.

A feature is the spelling and pronunciation of local geographic
names. This subject has been given careful consideration. The value
; of letters affected by symbols of sounds is phonetically explained, as
is also the etymology of words whose origin, whether foreign, Span-
ish, Tagalog, or native, is indicated. The origin of the names of
places, in the various dialects of all the islands, is shown by the fol-
lowing abbreviations:

Sp. = Spanish.

Nat. = Native word common to more than one dialect.

Tag. =Tagiilog.

Ver. = Vernacular, other than Tagdlog.

Hisp. = Native, transformed into Spanish.

For. = Foreign.



VIII GAZETTEER OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

The work thus completed contains the most recent and authoritative
information, from oflicial and other sources, respecting the Philippine
(Archipelago) Islands, their geography, ph3^sical features, areas, com-
munications, population, towns, resources, wealth, products, industries,
commerce, finances, social economy, natural histor}^, military occupa-
tion, and civil government, followed bj^ an alphabetically arranged
descriptive list of islands, provinces, districts, townships (pueblos),
cities, towns, hamlets, ranges, mountains, peaks, volcanoes, rivers,
seas, straits, gulfs, sounds, bays, lakes, promontories, capes, points,
light-houses, and other mapped objects and places, numbering upward
of 10,300, with maps, charts, and illustrations.

The encyclopedic features have reference only to information of a
practical nature associated with the places described.



EXPLANATION OF THE ORTHOGRAPHY OF NAMES.



If we except some foreign names, especiall}^ the English names oi
places situated on the island of Palawan and surrounding seas, the
orthography of the geographical names of the Philippine Archipelago
is in the main Spanish. It is so in spelling and also in accentuation.

The Spanish colonists not only gave names in their own language to
diii'eient places in the islands, but in writing the native words in
Roman characters used, as was to be expected, the Spanish spelling
and accent. Alcantara, Nueva Ecija, La Laguna, La Union, and many
other names are genuine Spanish. On the other hand, Luzon, Pam-
panga, and Bulacan, illustrations of originally indigenous words with
Spanish spelling and sound, are native words written as they sounded
to the Spanish ear, therefore but the development into a Spanish form
of the native Avords, as Lusong (Luzon), which means a rice mortar;
Kapangpangan, a place where river banks abound; Bulakan (with
the accent on the second syllable), a country where cotton is raised and
grown,

I A great number of native names, however, have been kept, although
!in several cases some differences may be observed between the native
sound and the Spanish spelling, on account either of the location of
accent or of subordinating the word to Spanish grammatical rules.

There is pending a controversy among Spanish writers and Filipino
scholars, with whom a good many foreign authorities agree, in refer-
ence to the orthography of native names.

The contention of the latter is chiefly that c after any vowel, and
before a, o, and u, must be superseded by k; c before e and i by s; j
by h; o and u in diphthongs bj^ w; qu Ijy k.

Thus Antique must be Antike; Abiicay must be Abukaj"; Balabac
must be Balabak; Loa}^ must be Lway; Lalauan must be Lalawan;
Cebu must be Sebu; Jalajala must be Halahala. As it is not the pur
pose to indulge in this linguistic discussion, it may be said in passing
I that the general sentiment of Americans in the islands favors the reform
intended by the native writers, since such movement is harmonious
with the value of letters in the English language and with he modern
wilting of Malayan words. English books and maps have already
I idopted it.



X GAZETTEER OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

In this Gazetteer, however, the old Spanish orthography is generally
retained, pending official action taken to implant the change referred
to, not only because the Government publications follow that system,
but also with the view of avoiding further confusion on the subject.

ACCENTUATION.

Some of the most general rules relating to Spanish accentuation are
here set forth in a condensed way, so as to give an idea as to the proper
place for accent marks, as follows:

I. All words ending in a vowel, or in n or s, which are accented on
the last syllable must bear the accent mark on that syllable (Alcala,
Bacon, Alos), the rule being that the greater part of words ending in
a vowel, or in n or s, are accented on the penultimate (Alfonso, Bal-
bagan, Calamianes).

II. All words ending in a consonant other than n or s and which
are accented on the penultimate must bear the accent mark (Abuyog,
Apalit, Balabac), the ride being that the greater part of words ending
in other consonants than n or s are accented on the last syllable
(Ambil, Bagac, Dumanjug).

III. All words accented on a syllable previous to the penultimate
must bear the accent mark (Alcantara, Principe).

We omit here many other rules, because the above-mentioned suffice
to enable the reader to familiarize himself with the accentuation of
the names contained in the Gazetteer.



(



KEY TO PRONUNCTATTON.



Irrespective of having attached to each name its pronunciation by means of
orthoepical representations, familiar to English-speaking people, there are given in
the accompanying table the sounds of the letters of the Spanish alphabet, and of
certain signs peculiar to native writing:



Let-
ters.



Pronunciation and remarks.



English a in father

English e in dress, benefit

English i in ravine; the sound of ee in bee

English o in mote, gone; aw in dawn.

English u in flute; the sound of oo in root ,

When a vowel is equivalent to i

[Must be pronounofd with a deep guttural sound.

[■English i in ice, tie when forming a diphthong

J^As ey in they; or ei in eight when forming a diphthong

J-As ow in how when forming a diphthong

>As o in one, when forming a diphthong

English b

{Sounds like k before a, o, and u
Before e and i is .soft like English s in native names, but
sounds like th in Spanish names.

Is always soft as in church

j-As in English.

[Is hard before a. o. and u

.^Sounds like English h before e and 1

|ue and ui after g sound like e and i, respectively

/Is not pronounced in Spanish names

\Is like English h in native names

Like English h

|as in English.

Sounds like the letters Ui in the English milUon

|as in English.

Has the sound of the letters nl in the English pinion

Sounds like ng in the English word singer; without the tilde

sounds like ng in the word finger.
As in English.

Sounds like k. Ue and ui after q sound like e and i respect-
ively.
{Rolled more than in English, especially at the beginning of
words and after 1, n, and s.
Like English r between vowels

Both letters are to be distinctly sounded.
As in sin.

[as in English.



Examples.



Like th in thin.



Abra, BaMbac.
Escalante, Itaves.
Balanguingui.

Ubong, Ugamut.
Lacy.



AgiUay.
Sibuguey.
Lanao, Mauban.
Canahauan, Laoag.

Bon toe.

Casolgan, Colasi, Cullli.

Cervera (Sp.), Cinapuran

(nat.).
Chocolate, Chongos.



Gapin, Golo, GusA.
Gerona, Gimanoc.
Guernica, Guiguinto.
Horadada.
Hagonoy.
Janiuay, Jaro.



Llana-Hermosa.



San o Nino.

Mangalddn, Pantabarigftn.



Quensitog, Quinabugan.

Ro.sario.

Aringay.



Eeference maybe made to the little care the Spaniards took in correctly pronounc-
ing the nasal consonant iig or simply g, and the deep vowels. For instance, Balanga
"s pronounced by Spaniards bah-lahn'-gah (the last a with a flat sound), and by
:he native is pi'onounced bah-lang'-ach. (the last vowel with a deep and somewhat
guttural sound).

XI



SIGNS RELATING TO ORTHOEPY.



The method of giving the pronunciation of the names in this Gazetteer by means
of English signs and representations is explained in the following remarks:

1. Each name is separated into syllables, which represent the Spanish or naf ve
sound, as the case may be.

2. An acute accent is placed after the syllable which should be pronounced more
forcibly than the others.

3. Whenever possible, the Spanish or native sound is represented by monosyllable
words very common in English.

4. Otherwise the representation is made as f Hows:
a is rejjresented by ah.

e by ay.

i l)y ee.

o by oh, au, or a-w.

u by oo.

ay J •
°^}bywah.

J by h.

g before e and i by h.
11 by ly.
ii by ny.

5. In the English representations g is always hard, as in give; th must be pro-
nounced as in thin, and ch as in chill.

6. "When two or more names with the same spelling occur in succession, and the
pronunciation of the first only is given, it is intended as a general rule that all sliall
be pronounced alike.

7. English names should be pronounced as in English.

Ill



ABBREVIATIONS USED IN ETYMOLOGIES AN])
DESCRIPTIONS.



A. = Archipelago; but only in half-measure matter.

A. G. 0.= Adjutant-General's Office.

C.=Cape; but only after a name, as Bojeador C.

cn.=ccnsus.

cm.=centimeters.

cub. ft.= cubic feet.

rub. m.— cubic meters.

D. I. A.=Division of Insular Affairs.

D. P.=Division of the Philippines. (See N. P. and S. P.)

E.=east or eastern.

°F.; °C.

fms.= fathoms.

F. 0. = Field Orders (military).
for.=foreign.

ft. = feet.

ft. B. M.=feet board measure.

geog. m.=geographical miles.

G. 0.=General Orders (military).

grp.=group, after a name, as Batanes grp., and in the half-measure only,
g. w.=gross weight.

Hdqrs.= Headquarters, except in descriptive title of a province.
hectog.=hectogram.
hectol.— hectoliter.

Hisp.=native transformed into Spanish.
I.=Island; but only after a name, as Alabat I.
in.=inches.
kilo.=kilogram.
kilos. = kilograms.
l.=left.
lat. = latitude.
lbs.=pounds.
L. H.=light-house.
lon.=longitude.
m.=miles
mm. =millimeters.
M. 0.=:money-order office.

.Mt.=Mountain; but only after a name, as Apo Mt.
N. = north or northern.'

nat. = native word common to more than one dialect,
naut. m.= nautical miles.
N. M.=Notice to Mariners.
N. P.=Department of North Philippines,
n. w.= net weight.
0.=official.
ozs.=ounces.

P. A. = Philippine Archipelago.
P. C.=Philippine Commission.
P. G. A.=The Provincial Government Act.
P. I. = Philippine Islands.
P. 0.=post-offlce.

3op. = Population, as, pop., 55,300; bid has a large Moro population, etc.
Pt.=Point; but only after a name, as Escardada Pt.
1. v.=quod vide, which see.
'•.=right.

Riv.=River; but only after a name, as Agno Grande Riv.
tl. R.=railroad.
5.=south or southern.
5.; SW.; N.; NE.; W.; etc.
;'). 0.=Special Orders (military).
). P. = Department of South Philippines.
!p.= Spanish.

q. kms.=square kilometers.
<I. m.=square miles.
t. m.=statute miles.
^ag.=TagAlog.

"er. -Vernacular other than TagAlog.
V.=west or western.
ds.= yards.



TABLE OF TEMPERATURE.



[Fahrenheit compared with centigrade and Reaumur. In this table the centigrade and Reaumur
readings are given to the nearest decimal.]



F.


C.


R.


F.


C.


R.


F.


C.


R-


F.


C.


R.


125


51.7


41.3


101


38.3


30.7


77


25.0


20.0


53


11.7


9.3


124


51.1


40.9


100


37.8


30.2


76


24.4


19.6


52


11.1


8.9


123


50.6


40.4


99


37.2


29.8


75


23.9


19.1


51


10.6


8.4


122


50.0


40.0


98


36.7


29.3


74


23.3


18.7


50


10.0


8.0


121


49.4




97


36.1


28.9


73


22.8


IS. 2


49


9.4


7.6


120


48.9


39.1


96


35.6


28.4


72


22.2


17.8


48


8.9


7.1


119


48.3


38.7


95


35.0


28.0


71


21.7


17.3


47


8.3


6.7


118


47.8


38.2


94


34.4


27.6


70


21.1


16.9


46


7.8


6.2


117


47.2


37.8


93


33.9


27.1


69


20.6


16.4


45


7.2


5.8


116


46.7


37.3


92


33.3


26.7


68


20.0


16.0


44


6.7


6.3


115


46.1


36.9


91


32.8


26.2


67


19.4


1.5.6


43


6.1


4.9


114


45.6


36.4


90


32.2


25.8


66


18.9


15.1


42


5.6


4.4


113


46.0


36.0


89


31.7


25.3


65


18.3


14.7


41


5.0


4.0


112


44.4


35.6


88


31.1


24.9


64


17.8


14.2


40


4.4


3.6


111


43.9


35.1


87


30.6


24.4


63


17.2


13.8


39


3.9


3.1


110


43.3


34.7


86


30.0


24.0


62


16.7


13.3


38


3.3


2.7


109


42.8


34.2


85


29.4


23.6


61


16.1


12.9


37


2.8


2.2


108


42.2


33.8


84


28.9


23.1


60


15.6


12.4


36


2.2


1.8


107


41.7




83




22.7


59


15.0


12.0


35


1.7


1.3


106


41.1


32.9


82


27.8


22.2


58


14.4


11.6


34


1.1


0.9


105


40.6


32.4


81


27.2


21.8


57


13.9


11.1


33


0.6


0.4


104


40.0


32.0


80


26.7


21.3


56


13.3


10.7


32


0.0


0.0


103


39 4


31.6


79


26.1


20.9


55


12.8


10.2








102


38.9


31.1


78


25.6


20.4


54


12.2


9.8









TABLE OF MEASURES OF LENGTH.



[For other terms i



kilo.s. St. m
1= 0.621
2= 1.242
3= 1.863
4= 2.484
5= 3.106
6= 3.726
7= 4.347



d eiiuivalents see Coinage, Weights and Measures, pp. 126, 127, 128.]
[1 kilometer=0.621 United States statute mile.]



kilos. St. m.
60=37.260
70=43.470
80=49.680
90=55.890
100=62.100



kilos.


St. m


8=


= 4.968


9=


= 5.589


10=


= 6.210


20=


=12.420


30=


= 18.630


40=


=24.810


50=


=31.050



COMPARATIVE SCALE OF MILES AND METERS.

NaluticalMile.



J.

"loo I 200

SNtute MHe.



r^



Cable's length, fms, 100=600 ft., A uaut. m.; chain cable, 8 lengths of 15 fms. each with shackles
120 fms.=720 ft.



MAPS.

Facing



Hydrographic, showing the lines of international boundary of the United
States possessions in eastern Asia defined by the treaty of Paris December
10, 1898, the geographical position of the Philippine Archipelago, with ref-
erence to the mainland of Asia, the surrounding archipelagoes, and adjacent
seas Title.

The World, showing the colonial systems of the Western nations 6

The Physical Geography of the Philippine Islands, showing the relations
and development of their mountain and drainage systems 10

Distance Map of the Pacific Ocean, the shores of eastern and southern Asia,
Eastern Archipelago, Australasia, Oceania, and the west coast of the three
Americas, showing tracks of full-powered steam vessels, with the shortest
routes between points, in nautical miles 18

Islands and Provinces; a general map of the islands and provinces and adja-
cent waters of the Philippine Islands (July, 1902) 154

Manila and Vicinity, city of, Luzon. (Cathedral dome lat. 14° 35^ 30.2'^ N.,
Ion. 120°58'6.3''E.) 184

Manila and Cavite Anchorages, Manila Bay, Luzon 186



CHARTS, COAST AND HARBOR.

Agusan Riv., mouth of (chart No. 4642), Surigao, N. coast of Mindanao, lat.

8°57^N., Ion. 125° 30^ E 273

Albay Gulf, Legaspi anchorage to Port Sula (chart No. 4250), Albay, SE. Li^zon,

lat. 13° 9' N., Ion. 123° 44^ E. (Legaspi) 281

lAlubijid anchorage (chart No. 1929), Misamis, Macajalar Bay, Mindanao, lat.

; 8°36^N., Ion. 124° 29' E 283

jAparri, approaches to (chart No. 1726), N. coast Cagay an, Luzon (light-house),

j lat. 18° 23' N., Ion. 121° 33' E., approximately 301

iBais Bay (south), (chart No. 1726), Negros Oriental, E. coast, lat. 9° 34' N.,

I Ion. 123° 9' E 313

Balanguingni grp., Samales Is., Sulu A., lat 6° 2' 24" N., Ion. 121° 39' 38" E. . . 318
? Balayan anchorage (chart No. 4244), Luzon, SW. coast, lat. 13° 56' N., Ion.

120° 35' E 321

Balingasac anchorage (chart No. 1929), Misamis, N. coast Mindanao, lat. 8°

45' N., Ion. 124° 46' E 323

jBanacalan (San Andres), port of (chart No. 1823), NW. coast of Marinduque,

„ i lat. 13° 31' 25"-N., Ion. 121° 50' 57" E. (Pammitaiigan Pt.) 324

3anga, Port (chart No. 1869), W. shore Sibuguey Bay, Zamboanga, Mindanao,

lat. 7° 30'47"N., Ion. 122° 24' 48" E 327

parrera, Port (chart No. 1895), NE. coast of Masbate I., Visayas, lat. 12° 32' 27"

j- Jf.,lon. 123°22'36"E 330

i'

?v



XVI GAZETTEER OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS.

Facing
page—
Basiauang Bay (chart No. 1711), 8W. shore Cotabato, Mindanao, lat. 6° 28'

50'''N., Ion. 123°58'22'^E 333

Batcin, Port (chart No. 1707), N. coast Cdpiz, Panay, lat. 11° 35' 40'' N., Ion.

122° 29'35"E 341

Bicobian, Port (chart No. 1726), E. coast Isabela, Luzon, lat. 17° 15' 20" N.,

Ion. 122° 24' E 357

Biri, Port (chart No. 193(5), Biri I., San Bernardino Strait, SE. Luzon, lat.

12° 38' 52" N., Ion. 124° 21' 24" E 361

Boca Engano, Port (chart No. 1875), E. coast Burias I., Masbate grp., off

W. coast Albay, Luzon, lat. 12° 47' 26" N. , Ion. 123° 18' 46" E 363

Bolai, Port (chart No. 1821), Balut Parido, or Sarangani I., off S. coast of

Ddvao, Mindanao, lat. 5° 25' N., Ion. 125° 25' E 373

Bolinao, Port and town (chart No. 4251, later issue), between extreme NE.

coast of Zambales, Luzon, and peninsula at W. head to Lingayen Gulf, lat.

16° 24' N. , Ion. 119° 54' 55" E 372

Bolinao, Port (chart No. 1726), NW. point of Zambales, Luzon, lat. 16° 24' N.,

Ion. 119° 54' 55" E 375

Borigao, Port (chart No. 1728), Tawi Tawi grp., Sulu A., lat. 5° 1' N., Ion.

119° 47' 50" E 379

Busin, Port (chart No. 1868), extreme NW. coast Burias I., Masbate grp.,

Vieayas, lat. 13° 8' 30" N., Ion. 122° 58' 25" E 390

Busuaiiga L, harbors, S. side of (chart No. 1707), Calamianes grp., lat. 12°

2'9"N., Ion. 120° 12' 56" E. (Mt. Tundalara) 392

Busafriga, Port (chart No. 1724), NE. coast of Burias I., Masbate grp., Yisa-

yas, off W. coast of Albay, Luzon, lat. 13° 7' 40" N., Ion. 123° 2' 45" E.

(Boca Is. ) 393

Cagayan Riv. entrance, N. coast of Cagayan, Luzon (chart No. 4242), lat. 18°

21' 42" N. , Ion. 121° 37' 27" E. (approximately) 400

Cagayan anchorage (chart No. 1929), Misamis, N. coast Mindanao, lat. 8° 30'

N,, Ion. 124° 40' E 403

Cayagtln Sulu and adjacent islands (chart No. 511), Cayagdn Sulu grp., Sulu

Sea, lat. 7° 38" N., Ion. 118° 26' 55" E 406

Calangdorang Bay (chart No. 1714) (Puerto del Principe Alfonso), E. coast

BalilbacL, lat. 7° 59' 55" N., Ion. 117° 4' 15" E 417

CalderaBay, approaches to, Zamboanga, Mindanao (chart No. 1831), SW. coast

of Zamboanga, lat. 6° 54' N., Ion. 122° 4' 10" E 419

Canahauan Is. (chart No. 1716), E. side Daram Channel, W. coast Stimar, lat.

11° 49' 21" N. , Ion. 124° 40' 53" E 425

Canalasan Cove (chart No. 1711), SE. shore Sarangani Bay, SW. coast D;ivao,

Mindanao, lat. 5° 46' 30" N., Ion. 125° 12' 35" E 427

Canoan, Port (chart No. 1710), NW. shore Siquijor I., SW. of Bohol, lat. 9°

15'17"N., Ion. 123° 35' E 431

Cataiiigan, Port (chart No. 1713), SE. coast of Masbate I., Masbate, grp. Vis-

ayas, lat. 12° 8" N., Ion. 123° 59' 25" E 440

Catbalogan and vicinity (chart No. 1876), W. coastof Silmar, lat. 11° 46' 6" N.,

Ion. 134°52'31"E. (AguadaPt.) 444

Catarman anchorage (chart No. 1929), Camiguin I., off NE. coast Misamis,

Mindanao, lat. 9° 12' N., Ion. 124° 38' E 445

Cduit Bay (chart No. 1869), W. coast Zamboanga, Mindanao, lat. 7° 32' N.,

Ion. 122° 5' 13" E 447

Cavite Arsenal (chart No. 1719), Cavite, Luzon, naval headquarters in the I

Philippines, lat. 14° 28' N., Ion. 120° 54' E 453



GAZETTEER OF THE PHILIPPINE ISLANDS. XVII

Facing
page—

Cebii, Port (chart No. 1893), between Cebu and Mactiin, Cebii, lat. 10° 17^

35"'' N., Ion. 123° 5¥ 9" E. (Fort San Pedro Light) 454



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