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were placed by Government forces in tne canals and laterals of the
project.

CONSTRUCTION DXJBINa FISCAL TEAK.

South Canal. — ^In August, 1915, by authorization of the director
and chief engineer, the work of completing the headworks for the
South Canal Iby extending a diversion dam across Stony Creek was
commenced. Because of delay in obtaining materials work was sus-
pended during the flood season and will be completed during the low-
water period of the current year.

Beginning in the fall of 1915 the enlarging of the upper 4 miles
of the Soum Canal and its structures was undertaken by Govern-
ment forces and was completed at the close of the present fiscal year.
This work was made necessary on account of the extension of the
project and was done according to the plans formulated in connec-
tion with increasing the storage at East i'ark reservoir.

On December 15, 1915, bids were opened for the relocation of a
part of the old Stony Creek Canal (now the South Canal), and the

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88 HFTEBKTH AKKtTAL KEPOBT OF BBOLAMATION SEBVICE.

contract was awarded to A. Hawkins, who completed the work m
April, 1916.

The following ccxistruction work was accomplished during the
year 1916:

Canal system :

Excavation cuWc yards— 20, 378

Riprap do 1, 074

Piling : linear feet penetration — 5, 466

Steel flume (No. 192 Hess) linear feet— 806

Fencing rods— 212

Lumber in place feet b. m_- 41, 541

Lateral system :

Excavation cubic yards— 484

Minor structures, concrete number 38

Fencing rodS— 220

Concrete lining (1^ inches thick) square yards 87,073

Revetment, brush linear feet— 600

Flood protection, riprap cubic yards— 241

Surface Drainage :

Excavation do 996

Open drains — miles 1. 1

Structures numb«P— 20

SEEPAOE AND D&AINAaE.

The drainage conditions on the project are very favorable. In

general the soil is porous, is entirely free from deleterious salts, iind
as good surface and subsurface drainage. Practically the only way
the land could be water-logged seriously would be by the excessive
iTse of water by the farmers without provision for surface drainage.
The danger from this source, however, is lessened by the provision of
the extension act, which bases the operation and maintenance cost
on the amount of water used. No serious water-logging of land or
rising of the ground water has occurred. The land under the project
is well provided with natural drainage channels, and with proper
care of these channels bv the landowners when they prepare their land
for irrigation practically all danger of water-loffging will be obviated.
The drainage plans for the project provide for the coordinating of
this work with the landowners as agricultural development advances,
the problem consisting primarily ox takins care of storm water dur-
ing the winter season, provision for whicn will provide incidentally
for any needed draina^ during irrigation seasons. As most of the

Sroject requires very little of this work, other than what should be
one as a part of the regular work that the landowners must do in
preparing the land for irrigation, the project can handle the situation
best and most economically in cooperation with the landowners as
farm development proceeds. This work was commenced during 1916
and will be pursued as occasion arises, a small amount of funds for
the j)urpose naving been provided in fixing the building cost of the
project. -

OPEEATION AND MAINTENANCE.

The irrigation works operated in 1916 included the East Park Res-
ervoir, the storage feed canal, and the north and south canal head-
works, together with 115 miles of canals and laterals and 46 miles of
natural channel. About 1,500 structures of various types were in use
in operating the system.



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OAUFOBKIA, OBLANB PBOJBOT.
Historical review, Orland project.



89



lUm.



1913



1918



1914



1915



19161



Acnage for which scrvfog wbb prepared to sapply

water.

Acreage irrigated

Miles of oanal operated

Water stored (acre-feet)

Water diverted (acre-feet)

Water delivered to land (aore-feet)

Per acre of land iRigat6d(aore-feet)



14,200

4,230

88

26,000

34,000

16,703

8.97



14,800


14,800


6,617


^'^


91


93


14,800


46,600


40,600


60,000


19,850


80,000


8.00


4.06



30,108
8,928

116
48,000
62,000
30,300

8.4



30,198
10,000
135
48,000
60,000
30,000
8.00



lEstimated.



SETTLEaiENT AND DEVELOPMENT.



On the whole the project was fairly prosperous, although during
part of the year business was somewhat depressed. Money for farm
development throughout the whole year was difScult to obtain. The
estimated investment in farm buildings and improvements during
the year was $122,673, which exceeds that of any other year except
1913. There were 55 new farms brought under irrigation during
1915, and the increase of j)opulation on irrigated farms was 225.
The average per farm was 3.6 persons for the irrigated area.

Dairying continues to be the paramount industry of the project,
with an estimated output of 700,000 pounds of butter dunng the
calendar year. The second creamery on the project began operations
early in the year. Both of the creameries of the project are owned
by local dairy interests and are conducted along cooperative lines.
They are both housed in substantial concrete buildings, have ex-
tensive cold storage and ice plants, and are equipped with modem
machinery.

There were more sales of unimproved land than for the previous
year and at somewhat lower prices. Prices ranged from $80 to
$126 per acre, with the average about $110. There remained at the
close of the fiscal year about 10,000 acres undeveloped.

The water rental charges were paid to the United States in a lump
sum by the water users' association through the levying of an assess-
ment of $1 per acre for all of the irrigable land in the project



Settlement data, Oriand project.



Item.



1918



1914



1915



mo



TMsI number of tanns on the pro}eot.. ,

Populatkn

Number of liTisstM Cwms

Opented by owners

Operated by tenants ,

Population.

Number of towns

Popolfttion..

Totel popolAtkm.

Number of pablie schools

Number of ohuTQfaes

Number of banks

Total oapltalstook

Total amoont of deposits

Total onmber el dspQStton.



860

950

246

238

28

896

1

1,300

2,250

6

8

2

81U^000



687
1,160
296
268
38
1,033

1,850

8,460

8

8

2

8110,000

8391,000

1,288



509

1,600
851
820
81

1,258

1,500

8,100

8

6

2

8141,000

8895,000

1,708



509

1,700

860

380

80

1,400

1,560
8,260

8

7

2

8141,000

8445,000

1,808



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90



FIFTEBNTH ANNUAL B£POBT OF BBOLAMATIOK SEBVIOB.



PBINGIPAL CBOPS.

There were 851 farms irrigated i^i 1916, with an average irrigable
area of 28.4 acres and an average cropped area of 20 acres. The total
area irrigated was 8,928 acres, an increase of 1,574 acres over 1914. •

There was an increase of 542 acres in alfalfa, but a larger acreage
of alfalfa was devoted exclusively to pasturage than during 1914;
5,135 acres were cut for hay, yielding 22,650 tons, which, estimated
at the market price for loose nay, was worth $153,322. Ninety per
cent of the crop was consumed on the project in feeding dairy and
other stock.

There were 875 acres of orchard in partial and full bearing and
1,000 acres not bearing. The total cropped area was 6,930 acres; the
estimated value of crops $220,422, or $31.81 per acre, an increase of
$4.82 per acre over the previous year.

An inventory of stock shows an increase during the calendar year
of $80,000, most of which was in dairy stock Mid hogs. The increase
of the former was 28 per cent and of the latter 66 per cent. The total
estimated value of stock and equipment on hand on the farms at the
close of the calendar year was $483,000, an increase of $90,000 for
the year.

Crop reportf Orland project, California, year of 1915.



Crop.



At«a
(Bcras).



Unit of
yidd.



Yldds.



Total.



Avtrage
per acre.



ValiiM.



Pertmlt
of yield.



Total.



PeraflT*.



Alfalfa hay

Alfalfa pasture...

Beans

Corn, sorghum...

Fruit, citrus

Fruit, declduoos.

Fruit, small

Prunes, dried....

Almonds

Garden

Nursery

Leas duplicated

Total cropped aoreafe



IirlMted, no crop:

Nonbearinc ordiard.

Young alfalito

Misodlaae*



5,135

4,829

30

307

118

»76

16

40

180

06

12

8,854



Ton..



22,650



4.4



$6.77



Bushel..
...do....
Pound.
..do....



340

10,544

292,200

184,000



12

34

2,586

2,421



2.02
.88

.017
.011



neouB....
Total irrigated



6^080



1,019
542
487



8,028



Pound.
...do....



110,000
72,900



2,750
561



.05
.103



$153,822
22,828
1,021
9.211
4,808
2,037
2,204
6,500
7,512
6,794
5,600



$29.85
6.16
84.08
8a 00
48.85
26.80

187.76

187.50
57.78
7a 77

466.67



Total and ayerage.



220,422



8L81



Anas.



Total irrigable area farms reported .
Total Irrigated area fiirms reported.
tJnder rental contracts. .1...



Under vested rights

Total cropped area farms reported. .



Acres.



9,971
8,928
8,708
160
6^980



Farms.



Pvoeot

of
projeot.



861


48


851


44


840


48.2


2


.8


861


84.1



> Small mixed orchards of aprioots, peaobes, ^ples, eto.

FT7BLIG NOTICES AND OBJDEBS.

PUBLIC KOnOE, MAY 24, 1916.

1. In pursuance of the provisions of section 4 of the reclamation
act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 888) , and acts amendatory thereof
and supplementary thereto, and particularly the reclamation exten-
sion act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), notice is hereby given
that water is available from the Orland project, California, for the

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OAUFOBNIA, OBIiAND PBOJBOT. 91

irrigation season of 1916 and thereafter, upon the filing of proper
water-right applications for the irrigable land shown on the follow-
ing farm unit plats :

Mount Diablo base and meridian.

T. 21 N., R 2 W.

T.22N.,R.2W.

T. 21 N., R 8 W.

T. 22 N., R 8 W.

T. 28 N., R 3 W.

T. 22 K, R 4 W.

T. 28 N., R 4 W.
approved by the Assistant Secretary of the Interior on May 24, 1916,
and on file in the office of the project manager, U. S. B. S., Orland,
California, and the local land office at Sacramento, Cal.

2. The maximum limit of area for which water-right application
may be made for lands in private ownership shall be forty acres of
irrigable land for each landowner except tnat water-right applica-
tions may be made for a maximum of 160 acres of irrigable land
by those landowners who were original subscribers to the stock of
the Orland Unit Water Users' Association and who are qualified
by the terms of tiieir excess land contract and trust deed with the
Orland Unit Water Users' Association to apply for a water right
for not more than 160 acres of irrigable land. Water-right applica-
tions for lands in private ownership may be made on and after the
date of this notice. All water-right applications must be made to
the project manager, U. S. Reclamation Service, Orland, California.
8. The water-nght charges for the lands shall be of two kinds —
(a) a charge of $44.00 per irrigable acre for the building of the irri-
gation system, termed the construction charge, the instalments for
which are due and payable as hereinafter provided; and (b) an
annual charge for operation and maintenance due and payable
March 1 of each year for the preceding irrigation season. The first
operation and maintenance charge will be for the irrigation season
of 1917, the amount of which charge will be hereafter announced.
The water service charges for the season of 1916 have been fixed in
the Secretary's order of April 26, 1916.

4. For all of the irrigable lands on said plats which on or before
August 13, 1914, were subscribed to the stock of the Orland Unit
Water Users' Association or which otherwise became subj'ect to the
reclamation law on or before August 18, 1914, and for which accept-
ances under the terms of the reclamation extension act shall be duly
filed within six months of the date hereof, the same being by means
of either (1) a water-right application on the form provided for use
under said reclamation extension act, or (2) a separate form of
acceptance provided therefor, the construction charge shall be paid
in 20 annual instalments, the first of which shall be due on December
1, 1916, and subsequent instalments on December 1 of each year there-
after until the construction charges are fully paid. The first four
of such instalments shall each be 2 per cent, the next two each 4 per
cent, and the next fourteen «ach 6 per cent of the construction charge.

5. For all of the irrigable lands on said plats which on or before
August 13, 1914, were subscribed to the stock of the Orland Unit
Water Users' Association or which otherwise became subject to the
reclamation law on or before August 18, 1914, the owners of which

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92 FIPTEBNTH ANNUAL REPOBT OP BEOLAMATION SEBVICE.

do not elect to file acceptances of the reclamation extension act, the
construction charge shall be paid in ten equal annual instalments,
the first of which shall be due and payable December 1, 1916, and
subsequent instalments on December 1 of each of the succeeding
years until the total construction charge is paid.

6. For all irrigable lands shown on said plats which became or may
become subject to the reclamation law after August 13, 1914, an
initial instalment of 5 per cent of the construction charge shall be
paid at the time entry or water-right application is made, and the
balance of the construction charge shall be paid in 15 annual instal-
ments, the first 6 of which shall each be 5 per cent of the construction
charge and the remaining 10 instalments each 7 per cent of the con-
struction charge, until the whole amoimt of the said construction
charge shall have been paid. The first of the 15 annual instalments
shall become due and payable December 1 of the fifth calendar year
after the initial instalment and subsequent instalments shall become
due on December 1 of each year for fourteen years thereafter.

7. Any water-right applicant or entryman may if he so elects pay
the whole or any j)art of the construction charges owing by him
within a shorter period than those designated herein.

8. In all cases where water-right applications for lands in private
ownership, or for lands held under entries not subject to said recla-
mation act, shall not be made within one year a-ter the dute of this
notice the construction charge for such lands shall be increased 5
per cent each year until water-right applications and an initial pay-
ment are made.

9. All payments hereunder shall be made to the special fiscal
agent of the Reclamation Service assigned to the project, unless
under section 7 of the reclamation act the Orland Unit Water Users'
Association is appointed as fiscal agent, of which due notice will
be given.

10. The method of determining the annual operation and mainte-
nance charge and the penalties for failure to pay the construction
charge and the operation and maintenance charge when due and
the discount allowed for prepayment of operation and maintenance
diarges will be as provided by the act of Aug. 13, 1914.

Bo Sweeney,
Assistant Secretary of the Interior.

OBOER, APRIL 26, 1916.

1. Under the provisions of section 11 of the reclamation extension
act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), the following order is issued
for the Orland project, California:

2. Water will be furnished on a temporary rental basis during the
irrigation season of 1916 at the following rates:

A rate of 10 cents per acre-foot for all water delivered prior to
June 1 and at 40 cents per acre-foot for water delivered on or after
June 1. A minimum payment of $1 per irrigable acre shall be made,
whether water is used thereon or not.

3. The charges for the minimum rate for the entire irrigable
acreage will be billed to the Orland Unit Water Users' Association,
and snail be paid to the United States on or before July 15, 1916.
Bills for water supply furnished in excess of the minimum charge of
$1 per acre shall be submitted promptly after the end of July and

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OAUFOBNIAy OBLAND PBOJEOT.



93



each month thereafter, and shall be paid by the Association within
15 days after the submission of such bills.

Franklin K. Lane.



FINANCIAI^ STATEMENT.

(FiDandal statement In detail, showing assets, liabilities, resezres, and capital, sLven in

appendix, page 699.)

Feature costs of Orland project to June SO, 1916.



Feature.



Subfea-



Princlpal
featnia.



Examination and surveys:

Investigations

HHI meter Installation

Clppoletti weirs

Rating weir, East Park Dam . .
Preliminary and general work.



Storages^

East Park reservoir survey..

East Park Dam, spillway, and dikes.
East Park stripping reservoir, site



Btonyford reservoir surveys.
Millsite...



East Park spillway extension

East Park surveys for additloual storage .
East Park food canal



CSnal system:

South dfveniott dam and works. .
North diversion dam and works. .

North Canal

South Canal

Administrative general expense. .
Miscellaneous structures ,



Lateral ^stem:

Nortnslde lateral excavation ....

Sonthslde lateral excavation

Concrete lining

Revetment

Minor structures

Administrative general expense.

Miscellaneous structures

Extension lateral 12

Puddling

Location surveys

Railroad crossing

Enlarging lateral lOQ



Drainage system:

Open drains ,

Administrative general expense . .

Flood protectiao:

Levees and dikes ,

Administrative general expense. ,

Farm units:

Preliminary and general work... ,
Administzative general expense. ,

Permanent improvements and land:

Buildings

Headquarters grounds

MiBoeuaneoos



Operet fcmmd maintenance during construction .
Pint accounts •



OroBS cost of oQOStruetlon of project to June ao, 1916. ,
M revenues earned during coDStructian period:

Rental of bufldings ,

Rental of graiing and Ibrming lands

Rentals ofirrigaaon water

Contractors' fracht refunds

Forfaituras by dasulting bidders and contractors

Other revenues, undassffled

Proflt on mess^oose qperaUons ,

Front on hospital opeiatkiiB ,



NM: cost of constr u ction o#prqfect to June 80, 1016. ,



IS, 582. 79

283.08

220.20

214.28

06w63



4,060.84

166,536.82

88,460.02

12&28

328.21

29,470.79

4,271.62

171,956.61



86,414.10
5,145.58

80,617.34

76,760.79
1,214.16

17,402.55



31,643.06

51,017.61

73,232.76

84.20

45,215.24

791; 98

16,950.08

3,365w80

695.80

2,462.78

6,251.43

1,058.66



762.00
41.60



402.86
6.87



1,320.00
80.60



7,635.08

6,862.88

271.72



984.00

3,217.00

95,818.60

1,829.82

2,115.00

1,787.51

14.07

708.38



I4,40&t7



454,222.10



167,654.61



882, 771b 06

804.10

400.72

1,860.80



14,760.68

00,154.23

987.04



076,638.48



106,470.23



830,068^28



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94 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF BEOLAMATION SEBYIOE.

Estimated cost of contemplated work^ Orland proieot, during fiscal year 1917.



FeatortB.



SabftA-
tuna.



PrinollMa
faatoni.



Btonge works: East Park Dam oatlet works, ona 86 by 36 inoh outlet gate. ,

Oanarsystem: South OBiial dlvwaloa dam, oomplata riprapplng

Lateral system:

Extenaian lateral 12 ,

10 minor structures

30,000 square yards (xmcrete Unfng



tl, 280.10
3,1



1,200.00

^.00

12,000.00



Diainace system: Open drains and drain structures.
Opecation and maintenance during construction:



Development.
Distribution..
Miscellaneous.



2,000.10

1,428.10
7,060.10
3,623.00



Operation and maintenance under public notice:

Deyelopment .-

Dfatribution

Miscellaneous



Hospitals...
Total.



1,672.00
8,780.00
8,078.00



8,010.00



18,600.00
2,000.00



13,000.00



14,800.00
600.00



47,600.00



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COIOSASO, GSANS YALLET FBOJECT.

J. H. MnTXB, project manager, Grand Junction, Ck>lo.

LOCATION.

County: Mesa.

Townships : 1 N., Rs. 1 B. and 1 to 3 W. ; 2 N., Rs. 2 and 8 W. ; 1 S., R& 1 B.
and 1 W.. Ute meridian, 9 S., Rs. 101 to 104 W. ; 10 S.. Ra 98, 101, and 103 W. ;
11 S., Rs. 98 and 99 W., sixth principal meridian.

Railroads : Denver ft Rio Grande ; Colorado Midland.

Railroad stations and estimated population, January 1, 1916: Palisade, 700;
Clifton, 100; Grand Junction, 8,250; Fruita, 700; Loma, 70; Mack, 40.

WATER SUPPLY.

Source of water supply : Grand River.

Area of drainage basin : 8,550 square miles above Palisade.

Annual run-off in acre-feet of Grand River, at Palisade, 1897 to 1899 and 1902
to 1915: Maximum, 5,230,000 (1912) ; minimum, 2^00,000; mean, 3,780,000.

Discharge in second-feet of Grand River, at Palisade, 1902 to 1915 : Maximum,
48,400; minimum, 1,102.

AGBICITLTUSAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS.

Area for which the Service is prepared to supply water, season of 1916 : 14,500
acres.

Area under rental contracts season 1916 (to June 30) : 2,576 acres.

Length of irrigation season : From April 1 to October 31, 214 days.

Average elevation of irrigable area : 4,700 feet above sea level.

Rainfall on irrigable area: For 23 years, average, 8.31 inches; 1916, 8.46
Inches.

Range of temperature on irrigable area :— 15* to 100* F.

Character of soil of irrigable area : Sandy loam, sandy mesas, and adobe.

Principal products: Fruit, sugar beets, alfalfa, grain, vegetables.

Principal markets: Large cities east of Rocky Mountains for fruit; other
products, local.

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIOATION.

No lands have been opened for irrigation by public notice. All lands irri-
gated in the project are supplied with water under rental contracts.

CHEONOLOGICAL ST7UHABY.

Beconnoissance and preliminary surveys begun in September, 1902.
OonstructioA recommended by board of engineers December 15, 1908.
Purchase of rights of way authorized by Secretary November 4, 1911.
Gonstruction authorized by Secretary September 23, 1912.
First Irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1915.
Bntlre project 61.6 per cent completed June 30, 1916.

IBBIGATION PLAN.

The irrigation plan of the Grand Yall^ project provides for the diversion of
water from the Grand River by means of a diversion dam located about 8 miles
northeast of Palisade, Colo., into a canal system on the north side of the river
for the Irrigation of lands lying north and west of Grand Junction, Fruita, and
Mack, Colo. About 42,750 acres will be supplied by gravity and 10,250 acres
by etoctrically operated pumping plants to be located on the gravity canal.

95



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96 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE.

Power for pumping will be developed in a power plant to be located at the
upper portal of Tunnel No. 3. On the first 6 miles of the main canal located
in the canyon of the Grand River there are three tunnels, respectively, 8,723,
1,655, and 7,292 feet long The United States claims all waste, seepage, spring,
and percolating water arising within the project, and proposes to use such
water in connection therewith.

On June 30, 1916, the diversion dam and head works were 99 per cent com-
pleted, and the earthwork, tunnels, and structures on the first 37 miles of the
main canal were completed. On the next 18 miles of the main canal the earth-
work was completed and the structures were 50 per cent completed. Laterals
to cover 14,500 acres in the first lateral district were 96 per cent completed,
and laterals to serve 10,000 acres in the second lateral district were 85 per cent
completed.

There remain to be completed the last 7 miles of the main canal, laterals for
15,500 acres in the second and third lateral districts, the power plant and pump-
ing system, and such drainage and flood-protection works as may be required.

BUMMABY OF GENERAL DATA FOB GRAND VALLEY PROJECT TO

JUNE 80, 1916.

Areas:

Irrigable acreage when project is complete ..— 58,000

Public land entered, June 30, 1916 9. 880

Public land withdrawn, June 30, 1916 20, 190

Private land, June 30, 1916 22, 930



Addition in fiscal year, 1916 14, 500

Estimated addition in fiscal year, 1917 20, 500

Estimated acreage Service can supply July 1, 1917 35,000

Finances :

Estimated cost of completed project $4, 595, 000. 00

Total construction cost to June 30, 1916 $2, 824, 539. 23

Per cent complete, June 30, 1916 61. 5



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