United States. Bureau of Reclamation.

Annual report - Bureau of Reclamation online

. (page 60 of 94)
Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of ReclamationAnnual report - Bureau of Reclamation → online text (page 60 of 94)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Preliminary and general work. . .

Wells, pits, and snafts

Pumping plants

Admlnistratlye general expense.

Canal system:

Preliminary and general work. . .
Diversion dam and headworks. .

Main Canal

Administrative general expense.
Supplemental oonstruction cost.

Lateral system:

Preliminary and general work..

Laterals and sublaterals

Flume

Drops, chutes, and checks

Siphons



Drainage system

Farm units

Pennanent improvements and lands:

Headquarters, buildings, and grounds.

ratrof houses and grounds



Telephone system

Operation and maintenance during construction

Plant accounts

Openition and maintenance chaiges transferred to and compounded
with construotion charges



Gross cost of oonstructian of project to June 30, 1916.
Less revenues earned during oonstruction period:

Rental of buildings

Contractors ' fniff^ t refunds

Forfeitures by defaulting bidders and contractors

Profit on mess-housp operations

Profit on mercantile store operations

Profit on hospital operations



Net cost of constnictifln of project to June 80, 1016.



Snbfeatuie.



10,406.77

1,354.66

128,710.41

8,-325.76



478.68

56,610.81

1,623,579.12

943.66

2,606.40



17,338.64

509,302.88

28,530.07

40,336.48

268,006.16



24,276.46
11,852.09



3,360.67
10,158.13
5,30L16
8,768.01
3,917.75
974.96



Principal
feature.



146,000.10



187,787.60



1,684,318.68



063,583.18
11,418.80
33,013.91



86,138.56

33,413.57

7,584.70

8,967.30

10,714.35



3,940,918.56



36,470.00



3,014,447.87



Digitized by



Google



WASHINGTON, YAK-ptfA PROJECT.



485



Bstimated coH of oarUemplated work, Yakima-Sunn/yside unit, during fiscal

year 1917.



Features.



Sabfea-
tore.



PrincliMl
feature.



Bzaminatlan and snrTey, preUminary and general work.
Pmnpinff for irrlgatioa:

Preliminary Tor general work

Pumping plants.

Txansmisslan lines

Pipelines



6,000.00
71,200.00

5,000.00
32,500.00



Osnal system,
Latoal system:

PfeUxninary and general work.

Laterals and sublaterals

Flnmes

Pipelines

Drops, cheeks, and deliveries. .

Culverts and turnouts



6,000.00
60,060.00

9,500.00
23,750.00
10,900.00

2,800.00



Farm units, survey and office work

Opention and mamtenanoe during oonstruction.
gpecation and maintenance under public notice. ,

Mercantile stores. I M. "'."'.' *!.'!."."*.*I.*.'.'' J.*

Hospital



Total.



92,000.00



114,700.00
8,700.00



118,000.00

2,500.00

14,000.00

06,700.00

800.00

100.00

300.00



352,800.00



Feature costs of Yakima-Tieton unit, to June SO, 1916,



Features.



Subfeatore.



Prlnciptl
feature.



Szaminstion and survisy . <
Storage works:

Bumping Lake Dam.

Clear Grsak Dam.



Ooial system:

Headwoiks

Tunnels,.

ICain Canal

Wasteways

Culverts ^nd drains.



Lateral system:

Headworks and diversion dams

Laterals and subtaterals

Flumes

Bridges

Drops, chutee, cheeks, and turnouts..

Siphons

wasteways

Culverts and drains



Permanent improvement and lands:
Buildings and grounds

RoadsT: :.

Real estate.



Telephone system, telephone lines

Operation and maintenance during construction

Operation and maintenance charges transferred to and compounded with
oonstruction charges



Gross cost of oonstruction of project to Jtme 30, 1916 .
Less revenues earned during construcaon period:

Rental of buildings

Rental of irrigation water

ContractOTB' freight refunds

lless-house loss ,

Mercantile store gain

Hospital gain ,



N«t cost of constniction of project to June 80, 1916..



8550,837.42
84,542.78



14,937.15

897,100.73

641,742.54

57,181.22

22,453.97



26,058.20
864,724.01
106,390.46
5,562.36
77,442.46
14,175.95
11,067.21
54,226.07



41,943.05
59.573.55
2,768.60



4,827.35
3,526.50
5,092.12
11,131.79
9,992.83
2,185.94



860,694.56



686,88a 20



1,183,416.61



1,162,546.71



104,286.10
26,148.78
10,20&54

28, 95a 97



3,169,63L47



34,492.95



3,146,138.52



1 Deduct.



Digitized by



\^oogIe



486 PIFTBBBTTH AKNUAL RBPOBT OP EBOIAMATION SEBVIOE.

Estimated oo8t of contemplated workf Yakima-Tieton unit, during fiscal year

1917.



Featnras.



8ub-
fBatare.



Pxinc^Ma
fBatnre.



Canal system, Main Canal

Operation and maintenance under public notice..



Mercantile stores.
Hospitals



S38,00Q.M

42,000.00
400.00
900.00
200.00



Total.



80,800.00



Digitized by



Google



WTOHINa, SHOSHONE PBOTECT.

G. O. Sanfobd, project manager, Powell, Wyo.
LOCATION.

Ck>iinties: Park and Big Horn.

Townships, 52 to 58 N., Rs. 97 to 104 W., sixth principal meridian.

Railroad : Chicago, Burlington & Quincy.

Railroad stations and estimated population January 1, 1916: Cody, 1,300;
'Corbett; Deaver, 50; 'Ralston; PoweU, 525; Garland, 50; ^Mantua; and
*Prannle, Wyo.

WATER SUPPLY.

Source of water supply : Shoshone River.
Area of drainage basin : 1,380 square miles.

Annual run-off in acre-feet: Shoshone River near Cody (1,380 square miles),
1908 to 1915— maximum, 1,420,000 ; minimum, 846,872 ; mean, 1,127,837.

AOBICULTUBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS.

Area for which service is prepared to supply water, season of 1916: 42,665
acres.

Works constructed for fifth unit, but not open to entry : 3,562 acres.

Area under water-right applications, season of 1916 : 37,570 acres.

Area under rental contracts, season of 1916: 150 acres.

Length of irrigating season : From April 10 to November 10.

Average elevation of Irrigable area: 4,500 feet above sea level.

Rainfall on irrigable area : 1907-1915, average, 5.92 inches ; 1915, 9.19 inches.

Range of temperature on irrigable area : —31* to 101° F.

Character of soil of irrigable area: Light sandy and clay loams.

Principal products: Alfalfa, grain, sugar beets, vegetables, cattle, hogs, and
dairy products.

Principal markets: Omaha, Nebr. ; Kansas City, Mo.; Chicago, 111.; Denver,
Colo.; Billings, Mont; and local.

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIOATION.

Dates of public notices and orders relating thereto : November 25, 1907 ; April
3, 1908 ; May 8, 1909 ; February 6, March 25, May 20, November 8, 1911 ; Feb-
ruary 9, March 23, July 17, 1912 ; January 17, February 26, June 23, July 15,
July 21, 1913; January 19, May 29 (memorandum), September 24, 1914; March
]. March 20, September 25, October 9, 1915; March 16, June 3, 1916.

Location of lands opened : Tps. 54 to 56 N., Rs. 98 to 100 W., sixth principal
meridian.

Present status of irrigable lands opened : 36,745 acres of public and 825 acres
of private lands under water-right application, 3,847 acres of unentered public
land, and 1,245 acres of private and State land open to entry for which water is
available, but for which no water-right application has been made ; 3.54 acres of
land included in United States reserves.

Limit of area of farm units : Public, 80 acres ; private, 160.

Duty of water : 2 acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm.

Building charge per acre of irrigable land : $57 on first unit, $58 on second
unit ; $59 on third and fourth units ; charge for fifth unit not yet announced.

Annual operation and maintenance charge : 70 cents per acre of irrigable land
whether water is used or not, for which 2 acre-feet of water may be deliv-
ered ; 15 cents for the third acre-foot ; and 25 cents per acre-foot for all addi-
tional water.

^BaUroad siding only. * Population less than 25.

487



Digitized by



\^oogIe



488 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL EEPORT OF RECLAMATION SEBVICB,

OHBOKOLOaiGAL SUMMABY.

Reconnolssance made and preUmlnary surveys began in 1908.
Ck>nstniction recommended by board of engineers, February 1, 1904.
Ck>nstruction authorized by Secretary February 10, 1904.
Gorbett diversion dam completed June, 1907.
Ck)rbett Tunnel completed November, 1907.
First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1908.
Shoshone Dam completed January, 1910.

Entire project 50 per cent completed June 30, 1916 ; first, second, third, fourth,
and fifth units completed.

IBBiaATION PLAN.

The irrigation plan of the Shoshone project provides for the storage of flood
waters of Shoshone River in a reservoir controlled by Shoshone Dam, about 8
miles above Cody, Wyo. ; the diversion of water from Shoshone River by a dam
at Gorbett, about 16 miles below the reservoir, and through the Oorbett Tunnel
into a canal system supplying water to lands on the north side of the river in
the vicinity of Ralston, Powell, Garland, Mantua. Frannie, and Deaver; the
diversion into the Will wood Ganal for the irrigation of lands on the south side
of the Shoshone River ; and the diversion into the north side High Line from
the Shoshone Dam for the irrigation of lands lying on the north side of the
Shoshone River above the Garland Ganal system and extending from the lower
end of the Shoshone Ganyon near Gody to the divide between the Shoshone
River and Glarks Fork drainage.

The United States claims all waste, seepage, spring, and percolating water
arising within the project and proposes to use such water in connection there-
with.

The Shoshone Dam, Gorbett Dam, Gorbett Tunnel, Garland Ganal, about 13
miles of the Frannie Ganal, the lateral and distributary system for approxi-
mately 43,000 acres in the vicinity of Ralston, Powell, and Garland, Wyo., and
the major portion of the canal system for the irrigation of the first unit of
about 11,800 acres on the Frannie division have been completed.

Future operations include the construction of the WiUwood and High Line
Canals and the completion of additional units on the Frannie division.

SUM1£A&Y OF GENEBAIi DATA FOB SHOSHONE FBOJECT TO JTJNE

30, 1916.

Areas:

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 147,865

Public land entered, June 30, 1916 36, 745

Public land open to entry, June 30, 1916 3, 847

Public land withdrawn, June 30, 1916 98,210

State land, June 30, 1916 L 6, 326

Private land, June 30, 1916 2, 237

Acreage service could have supplied season of 1915 42,816

Estimated addition in fiscal year 1917 11,876

Estimated acreage service can supply July 1, 1917 54, 712

Acreage actually irrigated, season of 1915 25,753

Acreage cropped under Irrigation, season of 1915 24,833

Crops:

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1915 |410, 031. 00

Value of irrigated crops, per acre cropped 16. 51

TPI n fl n (*f^ *

Estimated cost of completed project $9, 936, 000. 00

Total construction cost to June 30, 1916 $4,542,980.13

Per cent complete, June 30, 1916 50

Appropriation for fiscal year 1917, total ; $762,000.00

Allotment for construction, fiscal year 1917 $595, 700. 00

Estimated per cent complete, June 30, 1917 53

Announced construction charges per acre $57, $58, $59



Digitized by



Google



WYOMING, SHOSHONE PBOJSOT. 489

Ffnances — Continaed.

Appropriation, fiscal year 1916 $478, 000. 00

Decrease under 10 per cent provision of act 43, 800. 00



Total appropriation $484,700.00

Expenditures during fiscal year chargeable to 1016 appropria-
tion —

Disbursements $221, 067. 72

Transfers 19, 832. 19

$240, 899. 91

Registered liabUities chargeable to 1916 ap- '

propriation _._ 53, 186. 22



294,086.18

Unencumbered balance July 1, 1916 140,613.87

Repayments :

Construction charges —

Accrued to June 30, 1916 266, 132. 70

CJollected to June 30, 1916 260. 423. 45



Uncollected, June 30, 1916 5, 709. 25



Operation and maintenance charges (public notice) —

Accrued to June 30, 1916 133, 113. 54

Collected to June 30, 1916 123, 554. 03



Uncollected, June 30, 1916 9, 559. 51

Drainage:

Bstimated acreage damaged by seepage June 30, 1916 1, 000

Miles of drains built to June 30, 1916 -

Open 10. 32

Closed 55. 05



65.87
Bstimated acrenge protected by drains built to June 30, 1916— 16, 500

Bstimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 20, 500

Bxpended to June 30, 1916, on drainage works, completed
and uncompleted $468, 477. 16

HISTOBT OF CONSTRUCTION AND ENGINEEBINa FEATURES.

BOADS.

In order to prepare for the construction of Shoshone Dam it was
found desirable to have a road through the canyon by which to gain
easy access to the cliffs above the elevation of the top of the dam.

The construction of such a road on the north side of the canyon was
begun by Government forces in 1904. and early in 1905 the road was
completed for a distance of 4 miles n*om the mouth of the canyon to
the site of the dam. For the greater part of this distance the road
was cut into the solid rock of the walls of the canyon.

On account of the fact that a road formerly used in entering
Yellowstone Park passed through the site of the reservoir, the canyon
road has been extended for a distance of 14 miles from the site of the
dam around the flow line of the reservoir until it joins a newly con-
structed county road that connects with other roads entering the
park. Surveys for this extension, known as the Shoshone Eeservoir
highway, were made in 1908, and its construction was begun in 1908
and completed in 1910.



Digitized by



Google



490 FIFTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SEEVlCfi.

The old trail from Cody to Yellowstone Park was located on the
south side of Cedar Mountain, crossing the South Fork of the
Shoshone River near Marquette and continuing thence along the
south side of the North Fork. The construction of Shoshone Keser-
Yoir submerged several miles of this road and left no outlet for the
ranchers living between the two forks of the river. The Reclama-
tion Service prepared plans for the construction of 11 miles of Be-
tween Forks Highway. One-half of the work was completed in the
fall of 1911 and a steel bridge erected across the South Fork of
Shoshone River. The county officials agreed to cooperate with the
Reclamation Service in the construction of this road to the extent of
securing all necessary rights of way. Because of some difficulties
arising in securing such rights of way construction work was sus-
pended and not resumed until April, 1914, when a short reach was
completed at the crossing of the Cody Canal. The balance of the
road, which runs along the south side of the north arm of the reser-
voir, was completed in the spring of 1915.

SHOSHONE DAM.

The Shoshone Dam is located on Shoshone River a short distance
below the confluence of its north and south forks and near the upper
end of Shoshone Canyon. The dam is a monolithic rubble concrete
structure of the arch type, the radius of the center line of the top of
the dam being 160 feet. The maximum height from the rock founda-
tion to the top of the parapet is 328 feet.

The main outlet of the reservoir formed by the dam is, a concrete-
lined tunnel 498 feet in length, having a section 10 feet wide by 10
feet hi^h at the sides with an arched roof of 16-inch rise. The tunnel
was driven through the granite cliff on the south side of the canyon.
The elevation of the floor of the tunnel at its upper end is 5,140, and
at its lower end 5,137.

A second outlet tunnel, also on the south side of the canyon, has
its inlet floor at elevation 5,250. It is 10 feet square in section, has
a length of 300 feet, and is unlined.

On the north side of the reservoir, several hundred feet upstream
from the dam, there is a concrete spillway weir 300 feet long, dis-
charging at elevation 5,360 into an open channel and thence into
rtn unlined tunnel excavated to a section 20 feet wide and 20 feet high
at the sides with a roof arch having a rise of 2 feet 8 inches. The
spillway tunnel is 405 feet in length, has a slope of 10 feet in 100,
and discharges through an open channel into the river about 300 feet
below the dam. •

In connection with the construction of the dam, spillway, and main
outlet tunnel, there was also required on the north side of the can-
yon an unlined road tunnel 166 feet in length with a cross section 9
feet wide by 12 feet high.

Plans for the construction of Shoshone Dam, spillway, and outlet,
spillway and road tunnels, were prepared in 1905 and considered in
•June oi that year by a board of engineers consisting of Messrs. A. P.
Davis, G. Y. 'Wisner, A. J. Wiley, J. H. Quinton, D. C. Henny, and
H. N. Savage. Proposals were opened September 5, 1905, and con-
tract was executed September 23, 1905. Work on the outlet tunnel



Digitized by



Google



WYOMING, SHOSHONE PROJECT. 491

was begun November 21, and the construction of temporary diverting
works was begun December 12, 1905. In May, 1906, work on the
outlet tunnel was discontinued on account of high water in the river,
and in June of that year the temporary dam was partly destroyed.

In August, 1906, it became necessary to suspend the contract on
account of the failure of the contractor to prosecute the work satis-
factorily. On September 10 a new contract was executed by the
bondsmen of the first contractor and reconstruction of the temporary
dam we begun in November of that year.

In April, 1907, the excavation of the outlet tunnel was resumed
and it was completed May 10.

The temporary works required for diverting the flow of the river
during the construction of Shoshone Dam consisted of a rock-filled
crib dam, 300 feet long and 18 feet high; a timber flume 1,340 feet
long, 13 feet wide, and 8 feet high, discharging into the outlet tunnel,
and another flume 400 feet long, 10 feet wide, and 8 feet high, heading
at the lower end of the outlet tunnel. The portions of the temporary
dam and flume destroyed by flood in June, 1906, were reconstructed
in November of that year. The dam was repaired again in April,
1907, and the upper flume connected with the outlet tunnel, the
flume being finally completed on May 18, 1907. The lower flume was
constructed in the fall of 1907.

Excavation for the foundation of the Shoshone Dam was begun
December 2, 1907, and completed April 1, 1908.

The placing of concrete m the dam was begun March 30, 1908, and
completed January 16, 1910.

The excavation of the road tunnel waa begun May 12, 1906, and
completed January 17, 1907.

The open-cut excavation for the spillway was beffun in April, 1906,
and completed in April, 1909 ; and the driving of the spillway tunnel
was begun September 3, 1908, and completed m April, 1909.

Construction of the iipper outlet tunnel for the reservoir was begun
December 20, 1909, by Government forces. At the end of May, 1910,
the driving of the tunnel had been completed except for the excava-
tion of a part of the bench in the lower end.

High-pressure gates, — ^In the gate chamber near the discharge end
of the outlet tunnel of the Shoshone Reservoir are installed three
cast-iron gates each 7^ feet high by 4J feet wide and controlling a
waterway 7 feet high by 3 feet 8 inches wide. Proposals for supply-
ing and installing the gates and operating mechanism were opened
on December 20, 1906, and a contract was executed February 14, 1907.
The contractor was required to erect the gate frames and install the
gates and operating mechanism, but the excavating required and
the placing of the necessary concrete were done by the United States.
The manufacture of the gates was begun bj the contractor soon after
the execution of the contract, and the delivery at the project of the
gates, gate frames, and operating mechanism was made in May and
Jime. 1908, and the installation was completed in August, 1908.

Upon completion of the dam work for the next few years was con-
fined to some minor improvements in the road in the immediate
vicinity of the dam so as to make it safe for public travel. A wooden
stairway was erected down the north canyon wall to the balcony
across the downstream face of the dam and the steel ladder which



Digitized by



Qoo^^



492 FIFTEENTH AKKUAL BEPOBT OF BEOIAICATION SEBVIOB«

gives access to the operating chamber, where is located the machinery
for operating the high-pressure gates. Some additional survey work
was required to complete the necessary drawings covering the fiowage
lands within the limits of the reservoir.

During the fiscal year 1911 work was limited to ncMcessary opera-
tion and maintenance work in controlling the reservoir. A portion
of the reservoir site was fenced. In the spring of 1912 it was decided
to raise the water surface in the reservoir by closing the 42-inch pipes
through the base of the dam bj means of stop planks placed at the
upper end and after accomplishing this to plug the upper outlet
tunnel, if found necessary, with a large mass of concrete. Some
difficulty was experienced m lowering the water to an elevation where
the stop planks could be placed over the 42-inch pipes, and this plan
was abandoned and steps taken to place the concrete plug in the
upper outlet tunnel. While this work was in progress the sliding
gates in the lower outlet tunnel were left wide open. Upon comple-
tion of the concrete plug some difficulty was experienced in closing
the high-pressure gates, but this was finally accomplished although
the water stood at a. depth of 127 feet above the valve seat

Installation of valves on JiZ-inch outlet pipes. — In January, 1913,
work was started on the installation of twin 30-inch valves at the
lower end of the 42-inch pipes through the base of the dam. These
pipes had heretofore been discharging free. The low flow of the
river was handled through the high-pressure sliding gates. The
work involved the excavation of about 100 yards of loose rock so as
to lower the water below the elevation of the pipes, the placing of
four gates, each weighing 5,700 pounds with necessary reducers,
and the placing of 32 yards of concrete in the gatehouse around the
twin valves. The lowering of the reservoir in the fall of 1912 left
a large area of land where the vegetation had been destroyed. This
area became very dry, and the heavy winds coming down through
the mountain passes picked up the fine sand which drifted to the
farms immediately adjoining the reservoir and filled the air with a

freat cloud of dust which was noticeable at distances of many miles,
'he damage caused to farms in the vicinity of the reservoir by this
drifting sand made it necessary to purchase the fee title of three of
the farms and the payment of $14,760.97 damage claims in eight
additional cases. The total expenditure amounted to $38,654.97. In
addition to this trouble, there was also some damage in the vicinity
of Kane, Wyo., which is located at the confluence of the Shoshone
River with the Big Horn. At the time that surplus water in the
reservoir was being drawn off severe cold weather prevailed, causing
a considerable quantity of ice to form and block the channel so that
water and ice overflowed the adjacent farms. In many instances the
landowners were obliged to vacate their houses because of the flooded
condition of the farm. An adjustment of the claims resulting from
this overflow covered a total of 26 cases and a payment of $8,452.95.
Upon completion of the installation of the 30-inch valves they
were left open so as to pass a sufficient quantity of water for the
irrigable lands under the Shoshone project, as well as private rights
below, until the flood waters began to discharge over the spillway of
the reservoir. As soon as water began to overflow the spillway an
attempt was made to close the twm valves on the 42-inch pipes,
which was successfully accomplished with the right pair, but with



Digitized by



\^oogIe



WYOMING, SHOSHONE PROJECT. 493

the left pair the valves were not entirely closed and the vibration re-
sulting from the water discharging through a small opening under
a head of 220 feet eventually brought about the failure of uie con-
necting bolts, and the lower valve on the left pipe was torn loose
sometime in the spring of 1914. A few months later the second valve
on this same pipe was also torn from its fastening. No attempt has
been made to close this pipe, as it is necessary throughout the entire
year to discharge some water from the reservoir and this one pipe
satisfactorily meets all requirements, except during the height of
the irrigation season.

InstcUlation of balanced valves. — During 1918 and 1914 the prin-
cipal control of the stored waters in Shoshone Keservoir was limited
to the water held above the elevation of the spillway by means of
temporary wooden frames and stop planks. Consideration was given
to the installation of the additional controlling works which it was
not considered advisable to install during the construction of the
dam. A report was submitted under date of April 26. 1914, by a
board of engineers consisting of Messrs. O. H. Ensign, D. C. Henny,
A. J. Wiley, and H. N. Savage, fully discussing the controlling



Online LibraryUnited States. Bureau of ReclamationAnnual report - Bureau of Reclamation → online text (page 60 of 94)