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Inspection.


534 38


Instruments . . . .


137 25


Labor ....


846,179 93


Legal and expert advice


567 03


Lighting ....


12,501 35


Printing ....


322 85


Rental ....


10,481 60


Teaming ....


101,542 55


Telephone — telegraph .


61 83


Tools ....


83,768 57


Underpinning .


395 16


Water pipes


1,781 44


Devonshire Station Changes:




Construction .


1,408 21


Field suppUes .


1,938 38


Fuel . .


68 59


Inspection.


6 64


Labor ....


12,118 90


Lighting ....


383 73


Teaming ....


934 59


Telephone — ■ telegraph .


4 17


Tools ....


786 26


"Water pipes


18 13




l/|/|A-inr:oo




i,4:^u,^yc> ^.tl




$1,549,959 77


Interest (credit) .


17 36

f 1 'I'lO O'l'^ Al




qpl ,OT:t7,C/T:.i/ t: i


Increase :




East Boston Tunnel


$2,637 68


Boston Tunnel and Subway


78 02


Cambridge Connection .


38,297 61


Dorchester Tunnel .


18,981 27


Boylston Street Subway


32,099 10


Arlington Station .


42,096 84


East Boston Tunnel Alter


-


ations ....


1,549,942 41




$1,684,132 93


Decrease :




East Boston Tunnel Exten


-


sion ....


2,754 00


Net Increase


$1,681,378 93



16



City Document No. 30.





Summary.






From beginning Jan. 31, 1922,






of work to to


Total.




Jan. 31, 1922. Jan. 31, 1923.




Subway — Subway Commis


5-




sion


$14,131 16


$14,131 16


Part of General Expenses, 117,550 71


117,550 71


Engineering and miscel


-




laneous .


407,475 48


407,475 48


Section One


239,407 12


239,407 12


Two .


363,605 50


363,605 50


Three .


300,639 36


300,639 36


Section Three and one


-




half .


9,355 70


9,355 70


Four .


472,147 31


472,147 31


Five .


387,411 49


387,411 49


Six


327,541 86


327,541 86


Seven .


231,504 27


231,504 27


Eight .


95,902 06


95,902 06


Eight and one






half .


76,639 47


76,639 47


Nine .


299,452 07


299.452 07


Ten .


254,497 88


254,497 88


Eleven


270,310 57


270,310 57


Interest


258,575 60
$4,126,147 61


258,575 60




$4,126,147'61


Transfers to Alterations


J




see 11th report


4 95


4 95




$4,126,142 66


$4,126,142 66


Alterations — Part of Gen-






eral Ex]3enses


$2?,945 53


$28,945 53


Section Three .


2,568 26


2,568 26


Four .


163 42


163 42


Five


30,233 01


30,233 01


Seven .


178,516 16


178,516 16


Nine .


3 00


3 00


Ten .


534 04


534 04


Interest ....


1,905 56


1,905 56


Transfer from Subway, see






11th report .


4 95


4 95




$242,873 93


$242,873 93


Charlestown Bridge:






Total ....


$1,570,197 98


$1,570,197 98


Investigation of Congestion






of Traffic, etc.


$3,015 92


$3,015 92


East Boston Tunnel — Part




of General Expenses .


$161,134 78


$161,134 78


Engineering and miscel-






laneous


197,643 56 $1,849 02


199,492 58


Section A .


98,869 09


98,869 09


B . . . .


1,459,630 73 788 66


1,460,419 39


C . . . .


508,202 77


508,202 77


D . . .


246,569 26


246,569 26


E . . . .


188,303 27


188,303 27


F . . . .


243,686 10


243,686 10


Interest ....


248,156 88


248,156 88




$3,352,196 44 $2,637 68


$3,354,834 12



Transit Department.



17



From beginning Jan. 31, 1922,

of work to to

Jan. 31, 1922. Jan. 31, 1923.



Total.



Boston Tunnel


& Subway






— Part of General Ex-






penses .


1226,547 21




1226,547 21


Engineering and miscel-






laneous


419,450 55




419,450 55


Section One






815,586 82




815,586 82


Two






614,156 25




614,156 25


Three






683,832 90




683,832 90


Four






. 1,205,244 49




1,205,244 49


Five






. 1,080,023 84


$78 02


1,080,101 86


Six






334,530 37




334,530 37


Seven






139,723 14




139,723 14


Eight






617,152 07




617,152 07


Nine






678,714 43




678,714 43


Ten






142,835 42




142,835 42


Eleven




345,493 91




345,493 91


Twelve




45,417 52




45,417 52


Interest




648,179 81




648,179 81




$7,996,888 73


$78 02


$7,996,966 75


Cambridge Connection —


_






Part of General Ex


-






penses .


$62,740 15


$1,762 22


$64,502 37


Engineering and miscel


-






laneous


106,468 49


36,535 39


143,003 88


Section One


590,277 28




590,277 28


Two .


637,416 37




637,416 37


Interest . .


76,722 00




76,722 00




$1,473,624 29


$38,297 61


$1,511,921 90


Dorchester Tunnel — Par


b






of General Expenses


$196,371 09


$190 45


$196,561 54


Engineering and miscel








laneous .


828,930 05


3,762 24


832,692 29


Section A .






409,381 71




409,381 71


B .






876,613 35




876,613 35


C .






458,816 18




458,816 18


D






1,114,244 18


1,954 60


1,116,198 78


E .






2,327,351 58


11,590 27


2,338,941 85


F .






860,227 84


49 85


860,277 69


G. .






616,147 82




616,147 82


H






892,879 48




892,879 48


J . .






949,919 26


1,433 86


951,353 12


Interest






1,312,320 20
$10,843,202 74




1,312,320 20




$18,981 27 $10,862,184 01


Boylston Street Subway —








Part of General Ex-








penses ....


$102,010 30


$2,120 23


$104,130 53


Engineering and miscel-








laneous


209,411 52


29,807 88


239,219 40


Section One




756,763 21


6 40


756,769 61


Two .






1,215,541 26


164 59


1,215,705 85


Three .






585,416 58




585,416 58


Four .






1,457,386 83




1,457,386 83


Five .






729,105 29




729,105 29


Interest






320,194 59

$5,375,829 58




320,194 59




$32,099 10


$5,407,928 68



18



City Document No. 30.



East Boston Tunnel Exten-
sion — Part of General
Expenses
Eno;ineering and miscel-
laneous .
Section G
H
J .
Interest



From beginning

of work to

Jan. 31, 1922.



$33,639 30

974,131 55
289,576 11
627,059 41
140,712 58
224,138 91



Jan. 31, 1922

to
Jan. 31, 1923.



2,754 00



Total.



$33,639 30

974,131 56
289,675 11
627,059 41
137,958 58
224,138 91



$2,289,256 86 * $2,754 00 $2,286,502 86



Arlington Station — Part
of General Expenses .

Engineering and miscel-
laneous . . . .

Construction

Extension

Interest . . . .



East Boston Tunnel Al-
terations — Part of
General Expenses

Engineering and miscel-
laneous ....

Construction

Interest ....



Chapter 78 — Resolves of
1913 ....

Chapter 84 — Resolves of
1913 ....

Dorchester Tunnel Exten-
sion ....



$39,551 09

71,444 07
564,560 35
464,954 89

45,406 58



1,762 17 $41,313 26



1,532 38
11,473 54
16,996 65
10,332 10



72,976 45
576,033 89
481,951 54

55,738 68



$1,185,916 98 $42,096 84 $1,228,013 82



1,121 76 $34,666 04 $38,787 80



24,954 34 68,798 51

116,139 67 1,446,495 22

* 17 36



93,752 85

1,562,634 89

* 17 36



$146,215 77 $1,549,942 41 $1,695,158 18



$389 14



$636 58



$520 19



$389 14



$636 58



$520 19



Grand Totals



$38,605,907 79 $1,681,378 93 $40,287,286 72



* Decrease.

The report of the Chief Engineer follows.



Thomas F. Sullivan,
Francis E. Slattery,
Louis K. Rourke,

Commissioners.



Transit Department. 19



KEPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEEE.



Boston, January 31, 1923.
Thomas F. Sullivan, Francis E. Slattery and Louis K.
RouRKE, Commissioners, City of Boston — Transit De-
partment.

Gentlemen, — ■ I herewith submit a report for the year
ending January 31, 1923.

The engineering work of the department during the last year
has been of a more varied nature than in the years preceding,
principally on account of taking over a large amount of the
actual construction work which has usually been let out by
contract. The amount of detail office engineering work has
consequently greatly increased, as this construction work has
involved the design and plans *for equipment, temporary
supports for buildings and subway structures, underpinning,
etc., as well as the layouts, design and detail plans of the new
structures, also estimates and orders for all materials.

The designs and plans have been made under the direction
of Assistant Engineer Leonard B. Howe, and the construction
work has been carried on in the following places :

East Boston Tunnel Alterations, Maverick square.

East Boston Tunnel Alterations, Extension of Devonshire Station.

Cambridge Connection, Enlargement of platform and stairwaj , Park street

under.
Lowering platforms at Haymarket square, Adams square and Boylston

street stations of the Tremont street subway.
Column changes, ScoUay square station.
Arlington Station, Permanent repaving in Arlington and Boj Iston streets.

EAST BOSTON TUNNEL ALTERATIONS.
The engineering and construction work in Maverick square
and Lewis street was continued during the month of February
along the lines described in the last annual report. Early in
March, however, preparations were made to carry on the work
on a much larger scale by adding greatly to the working force
and equipment.



20 City Document No. 30.

The number of men was increased during the month from
about 200 to 600. During the succeeding months this force
was further increased until a maximum of 895 men was reached
in October.

All of the men employed were obtained from the State Civil
Service list and about 85 per cent of the men were veterans.
The work of subway construction, involving, as it does, deep
excavation, bridging, bracing, waterproofing, bending and plac-
ing rods, erecting structural steel, concreting, etc., was in most
cases new to the majority of the men, but working under
experienced foremen, the men with but few exceptions showed
a willingness to do heavy work and ability to quickly grasp
the various steps in this type of construction.

The storage yard, temporary buildings and plant were
described in the previous report. The number of temporary
buildings, however, has been increased as the job has expanded.
A tool house was erected on Emmons street. A machine shop,
equipped with lathe, drill press, etc., was erected on the mound
over the tunnel in Maverick square, as was also a men's
house containing two large rooms for the men and a room for
the foremen. A central time office was attached to this build-
ing, through which all of the men were required to check in
and out. The men's house is shown on Plate 1.

The equipment was increased by the addition of sixteen large
wagon derricks (eight electric and eight steam), ten dirt
hoppers, a 400-foot cableway, a number of electric, gas and
steam pumps, also pneumatic hammers, concrete breakers,
drills and clay diggers. A 20-ton platform scale was placed in
Sumner street for the weighing of all crushed stone, sand and
other materials as delivered. Six of the electric derricks were
designed and built by the Department at a considerable saving
in time and money.

The general layout of the whole work was such that it could
be divided into three divisions, each of a different type of con-
struction. These divisions were located as follows; Chelsea
street, Maverick square and Lewis street.

The Chelsea street division was a double-track subway built
of reinforced concrete sidewalls and invert and having a flat
slab concrete roof supported on steel cross beams.

The Maverick square division consisted of two sections and
a loop of single-track subway entirely of reinforced concrete.

The Lewis street division was an underground 4-track station




PLATE 2.— TRENCH FOR EAST WALL OF SUBWAY — CHELSEA STREET



Transit Department. 21

with single-track loop beyond. The station, constructed in
part under large buildings on each side of the street, was designed
of heavy steel and reinforced concrete in order not only to
carry the present buildings but to support buildings of a much
heavier type in the future.

Chelsea Street.

Construction on the Chelsea street division was started by
first excavating for the sidewalls in deep narrow trenches, with
provision for the construction of new sewer, water and gas
mains outside of these walls. As the old sewer and other pipes
were located in the centre of the street, which space was to be
occupied by the new subway when constructed, it was there-
fore necesssary to relocate the pipes on both sides of the street.
The side trenches were carried down, leaving the center of the
street, or a core about 18 feet wide, to be removed later.

Four-inch tongued and grooved sheeting was driven on the
sides next to the buildings and 2-inch spruce poling boards in
short lengths were used on the sides next to the core. The
tongued and grooved sheeting was left in place and provided
a vertical surface on which the waterproofing was applied. The
poling boards were removed during the excavation of the core,
which required no bracing, as the walls were at that time in
place and were held by an occasional strut or a roof beam.

Great care was taken in bracing the side trenches in order to
prevent settlement of the brick buildings on each side of the
street, as the trenches, which were about 28 feet in depth, were
much deeper than the foundations of the nearby buildings.

The soil consisted of about seven feet of fill on top of the
original marsh land, next a layer of peat varying from one to
six feet thick, then a layer of soft light-blue clay. This clay
became darker in color and stiffer as the depth increased, and
at the bottom of the trench was a hard blue clay.

The work was carried on without settlement to any of the
buildings although on several occasions the trenches were
flooded by the backing up of the old sewer during a heavy
storm and high tide. Plate 2 shows the easterly trench and
method of bracing.

After the trenches were completed and the reinforced con-
crete walls, concrete sewers and other pipes placed, the work
of removing the remainder of the earth, or core, in the centre



22 City Document No. 30.

of the street was started and carried down by means of the
cableway. Plate 3 shows this work in progress.

The excavation of the core was carried down (removing the
old sewers, water, gas and service pipes), the invert built and
the steel roof beams placed, after which the concrete flat slab
roof was poured. The beams were 30 inches in depth, about
31^ feet long and weighed about three tons each. Plate 4
shows the method of placing them with the cableway.

At the northerly end of this section a machine shop is being
built in the subway, having two floors, one being the invert of
the subway and the other a mezzanine floor, each about 30 by
30 feet. A stairway and elevator shaft have been built under
the westerly sidewalk to connect with both floors.

Inspection car pits, about 200 feet in length, have been built
in the invert, as it is intended to use this section of the subway
for storage and repair of the new steel tunnel cars until such
time as the subway is extended up Chelsea street.

Maverick Street.

The method of carrying on the work in the Maverick square
division on the west side was described in detail in the
last report, and the same method was used in the construc-
tion work on the east side of Maverick square where the street
was first bridged and a number of sections were worked
simultaneously.

Plate 5 shows method of carrying down the excavation.
Plate 6 shows typical roof reinforcing in place. Plate 7 shows
a typical finished section of subway in Maverick square.

Lewis Street.
The Lewis street division, or station proper, was the last
to be started, on account of its location, which, as above stated,
was partly under heavy buildings. This made it more inaccessi-
ble than the other sections of the work, and a large amount of
detail work was involved in preparing plans for the temporary
support of the buildings, making real estate takings, designing
the underpinning and permanent structure and ordering the
structural steel and other material before proceeding with the
actual work. The construction has been carried on with as
little inconvenience to the occupants of the different buildings as
possible.




cq
o



o

Ph

;^

P^

<i
p^
o

Oh




PLATE 11.— TEMPORARY SUPPORT OF 300 TON COLUMN IN BUILDING.

—LEWIS STREET.



Transit Department. 23

The buildings on Lewis street vary considerably in the type
of construction but practically all the buildings on both sides of
the street between Sumner street and Marginal street had to be
temporarily supported.

The buildings on the east side of Lewis street were very heavy
warehouses with walls and inside columns that were to rest on
the station roof. Special methods were used for supporting
these walls and columns while the old foundations were removed.
On the west side the buildings were older but less substan-
tially constructed, one being of the old wooden type. Great
care was necessary to avoid settling these structures.

The temporary underpinning beams were so designed, and
ordered in such lengths, that after their use for temporary under-
pinning they were fabricated in our Cypher-street shop into
columns, girders and beams to be used in the permanent con-
struction of the station. Part of this work has already been
done and the permanent steel placed as planned.

The method followed on this work was in general as follows :
After a permanent taking was made a temporary taking of
occupation was made of such space above ground as was needed
to carry on the work. Tight wooden partitions were then
erected in the portions of the buildings to be occupied and the
work of cutting out the foundation walls and supporting the
buildings on steel beams and blocking was started. The slice
method was used, as it involved supporting and underpinning
only portions of a building at one time. These slices were
generally started at the corners of the buildings, and after the
buildings were caught up, the excavation was carried down in
the manner previously described. Pneumatic clay diggers were
used on this as on all other sections of the work and were found
to be very advantageous in excavating in congested places under
the buildings. Plate 8 shows three of these pneumatic diggers
in use.

After the excavation was completed a section of the subway
station was built, and that portion of the building supported was
pinned down upon the new subway roof.

Plates 9 and 10 show different types of temporary support of
buildings on Lewis street. Plate 11 shows method of supporting
a 300-ton column while the old column foundation is being
removed.

The portion of the station under the buildings is still in process
of construction. The work has been carried on with consider-



24 City Document No. 30.

able difficulty during the last two months by reason of extremely
cold weather and repeated accumulations of snaw and ice in the
bottoms of the excavations.

A portion of the concrete ventilating chamber of the old
tunnel on Lewis street was removed, and this was done by drill-
ing during the day time and blasting with light charges of dyna-
mite during the night time between the hours of 1 and 5 a. m.
when but one track of the tunnel was being used. This method
will be followed in removing about 520 feet of the old tunnel in
the centre of Lewis street after the side track portions of the
station are completed under the buildings.

The excavated earth, foundation stone, broken concrete and
other materials taken from the work, were, as in the previous
year, handled by teams and trucks furnished by Edward J.
McHugh & Son.

At this time about 75 per cent of the excavation and about
60 per cent of the entire work is completed.

The work has been carried on under the direction of Assistant
Chief Engineer Wilbur W. Davis.

Extension of Devonshire Station.

At the request of the Boston Elevated Railway Company the
platforms of the Devonshire station are being lengthened on the
easterly end a distance of thirty feet. The actual work of
excavation was begun in front of 53 State street on September 6,
1922. At the date of this report the new wall and sewer have
been built on the southerly side and the excavation on the
northerly side has been nearly completed. The excavation on
the northerly side has been done with care in short stretches, as
the bottom of the digging is about six feet below the foundation
of the adjacent building. A new sewer is also being laid on this
side. The work will require the cutting out and removing of
the old walls and roof of the tunnel. The new walls are being
built of reinforced concrete but the roof will have 30-inch sttU
beams, generally four feet on centres, in place of the old rein-
forced concrete construction.

Extensive changes have been made by the various companies
controlling the conduits in the street, and the water pipes and
gas pipes will be relocated as the work progresses.

The work of building the extension is being done by this
department with its own men.

Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, Robert B.
Farwell.



Transit Department. 25

CAMBRIDGE CONNECTION.

Enlargement of Platform and Stairway, Park Street

Under.

This work was described in the last annual report. It was
continued and the new stairs and westerly side of the passage-
way opened to travel June 15. The whole work, including
the wall finish, was completed August 22, 1922. The work,
except the wall finish and the installation of hand rails, was done
by employees of the Transit Department. The wall finish was
done by the A. V. Day Company, and the hand rails were put
in by 0. H. Drisko & Co.

Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, Robert B.
Farwell.

TREMONT STREET SUBWAY.
Lowering Platforms at Haymarket Square, Adams Square

AND BOYLSTON StREET STATIONS OF THE TrEMONT StREET

Subway.

The work of cutting down the platforms of the Haymarket
square, Adams square and Boylston street stations was done
during the summer by employees of this department.

The platforms were cut out in short stretches, considerable
of the work being done at night, and oftentimes portions along
the track would be covered with planking during the hours of
the day when travel was the heaviest. The new granoHthic
was placed and given a gradual upward slope from the track
toward the middle of the platform. The excavated material
was taken out at night on dump cars of the Boston Elevated
Railway. The sand and crushed stone for the new granolithic
was brought in on these cars.

Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, Robert B.
Farwell.

Column Changes, Scollay Square Station of the Tremont
Street Subway.

Changes in the location of certain columns at Scollay square
involved the placing of new girders to support the roof beams.
This was done by employees of this department between the
hours of 1:00 o'clock and 5:00 o'clock in the morning, when
there were no cars running through the subway.

Assistant Engineer in Charge of Construction, Robert B.
Farwell.



26 City Document No. 30.

BOYLSTON STREET SUBWAY.

Arlington Station.

Construction Data.

Restoring Street Pavement Arlington Street.
Contractor: Coleman Brothers, Inc.
Date of beginning of work: June 27, 1922.
Date of completion of work: July 18, 1922.
Total amount of work done: Laying Bessemer Brick and furnishing and

laying concrete base over a portion of the area, 213 square yards.
Total amount paid, exclusive of brick, $1,232.63.
Total amount paid for Bessemer Brick, $495.60.

Restoring Street Pavement Boylston Street.

Contractor: B. E. Grant Company.

Amount of bid: $23,200. (See Appendix G).

Date of contract: July 11, 1922.

Date of beginning of work: July 13, 1922.

Time for comoletion named in contract: 60 days.

Date of certificate of completion: August 14, 1922.

Total amount of work done under the principal items of the contract:
Preparing site, furnishing and laying wood block pavement, including
mortar bed, 5,387 sq. yds.; breaking out and remo^'ing old concrete base,
562.5 cu. yds. ; furnishing and laying 6-inch concrete base, 719.5 cu. yds. ;
resetting granite edgestones, 384 lin. ft.; re-laying brick sidewalk, 304
sq. yds.; furnishing and laying granolithic sidewalk, 147 sq. yds.; fur-
nishing grout and flooding into stone Isallast, 108.74 cv. yds.

Assistant Engineer in charge of work: William W. Lewis.

The work of repaving Boylston street from near Arlington
street to near Berkeley street and of repaving Arlington street


2 4

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