United States. Census Office (12th census : 1900).

Bulletins of the twelfth census of the United States : issued from October 6, 1900 to [October 20, 1902] ... number 4 [-247] online

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Online LibraryUnited States. Census Office (12th census : 1900)Bulletins of the twelfth census of the United States : issued from October 6, 1900 to [October 20, 1902] ... number 4 [-247] → online text (page 185 of 222)
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70,706 farmers, or 42.1 per cent of all in the state, the
average receipts per farm being $110.32. In obtaining
these reports the enumerators were instructed to secure



10



from each farm operator a statement of the amount
received from the sale of live animals in 1899, less the
amount expended for animals purchased during the
same year.

DAIRY PRODUCE.

In 1899, 126,784 farmers, or 75.5 per cent of all in
the state, reported dairy products. Of the $6,999,994
given in Table 16 as the value of dairy products,
$5,151,473, or 73.6 per cent, represents the value of
dairy products consumed on farms, and $1,848,521, or
26.4 per cent, the amounts received from sales of such
products. Of the latter amount, $944,496 was received
from the sale of 6,889,183 gallons of milk, $869,314,
from 5,238,202 pounds of butter; $32,323, from 59,838
gallons of cream; and $2,388, from 24,310 pounds of
cheese.

The production of milk in 1899 was 26,924,969 gal-
lons greater than in 1889, a gain of 34.5 per cent. The
amount of butter made on farms increased 10.9 per
cent, and that of cheese made on farms decreased 71.0
per cent in the same time.

POULTRY AND EGGS.

The value of poultry products in 1889 was $6,581, 553,
of which 56.9 per cent represents the value of poultry
raised, and 43. 1 per cent that of eggs produced. The
number of eggs produced was 11,992,889 dozens greater
in 1899 than in 1889, a gain of 88.5 per cent. Rock-
ingham and Shenandoah counties were first in the pro-
duction of eggs, each reporting more than a million
dozens.

WOOL.

In 1899 more wool was reported than by any census
since 1860. The gain since 1889 was 39.4 per cent.
This increase is, however, more apparent than real,
owing to the fact that the fleeces of 139,572 sheep were
omitted from the table in 1890, but included in a gen-
eral estimate of wool shorn after the census enumeration.

HONEY AND WAX.

The production of honey in 1899 was 11.6 per cent,
and that of wax 36.3 per cent greater .than in 1889.
Pittsylvania, Bedford, and Franklin counties were first
in apiarian products.

HORSES AND DAIRY COWS ON SPECIFIED CLASSES OF
FARMS.

Table 17 presents, for the leading groups of farms,
the number of farms reporting horses and dairy cows,
the total number of these animals for each group, and
the average number per farm. In computing the
averages presented, only those farms which report the
kind of stock under consideration are included.



Table 17.— HORSES AND DAIRY COWS ON SPECIFIED
CLASSES OF FARMS, JUNE 1, 1900.





HORSES.


DAIRY COWS.


CLASSES.


Farms
report-
ing.


Number.


Aver-
age
per

farm.


Farms
report-
ing.


Number.


Aver-
age
per

farm.


Total


123,347


298, 522


2.4


126,792


281,876


2.2








96,652
26, 795


259,568
38,964


2.7
1.5


104, 562
22,230


253, 373
28,503


2.4




1.3








88,364

1,726

11,142

22, 115


221,127
8,208
21,982
47, 205


2.5
4.8
2.0
2.1


91, 402
1,635
9,846

23,909


211,944

8,048

19, 400

-42,484


2.3




4.9




2.0




1.8








15,634
49,952
27,605
13,783
16, 373


20,616
86,875
69,334
44,710
76,987


1.3
1.7
2.5
3.2

4.7


16, 452
51, 575
28,325
14,049
16,391


20,263
84,505
65,963
42,349
68,796


1.2




1.6


100 to 174 acres


2.3




3.0


260 acres and over


4.2




26,615
6,884
1,306

33,189
1,400

14, 161
578

39,215


78,566
13,953

3,276
94,006

6,935

27, 638

869

73,279


3.0
2.0
2.5
2.8
5.0
2.0
1.5
1.9


26, 803
4,815
1,277

36,548
1,624

13,300
559

41,866


68,748
8,176
2,558
97,348
15,093
18,322
772
70,860


2.6




1.7


Fruit


2.0




2.7




9.3




1.4




1.4




1.7







1 Including "part owners" and "owners and tenants."

2 Including sugar farms, florists' establishments, and nurseries.

CROPS.

The following table gives the statistics of the princi-
pal crops grown in 1899;

Table 18.— ACREAGES, QUANTITIES, AND VALUES OF
THE PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS IN 1899.



Corn

Wheat

Oats

Barley

Rye

Buckwheat

Broom corn

Bice

Kafir corn

Flaxseed

Clover seed

Grass seed

Hay and forage

Cottonseed

Cotton

Tobacco

Hops

Peanuts

Dry beans

Dry pease

Potatoes

Sweet potatoes

Onions

Miscellaneous vegetables .

Maple sugar

Maple sirup

Sorghum cane

Sorghum sirup

Small fruits

Grapes

Orchard fruits

Tropical fruits

Nuts

Forest products

Flowers and plants ,

Seeds

Nursery products

Miscellaneous



Acres.



Unit of meas-
ure.



1,910,085

927,266

276,394

2,768

31,534

19,251

1,762

25

9

10



612, 962



25,724
184,334

116,914
6,411
22, 206
51,021
40,681
1,717
97,285



,039



8,796

4 1,663

•■206, 362



143

22

1,200



Total 4,653,584



Bushels..
Bushels..
Bushels..
Bushels..
Bushels..
Bushels.
Pounds .
Pounds . .
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels. .
Bushels.

Tons

Tons

Bales

Pounds .
Pounds .
Bushels .
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.



Pounds .
Gallons.
Tons ...
Gallons.



Centals .



Quantity.



36,748,410

8, 907, 510

3,269.430

531346

246,834

244,321

663,390

4,374

170

50

4,144

20, 960

943,079

!3,390

10, 789

122,884,900

165

3, 713, 347

56,189

219, 142

4,409,672

4,470,602

205, 869



19,310

1,677

8 2, 320

555,321



36,089



Value.



$16, 233, 756

6,161,000

1,103,616

25,007

124, 105

111,731

34,658

94

80

52

19,603

21,097

7,670,082

34,948

346,600

7,210,195

17

2, 261, 148

66,066

218,477

2, 494, 627

1, 720, 188

143,299

4,725,160

'1,816

1,534

6,012

190,903

765,097

687,737

•2,662,483

158

6,109

3,797,116

238,712

3,384

214,988

1,197



58,701,742



i Exclusive of 1,779 tons, valued at $18,344, sold iu seed cotton and included
with the cotton.

2 Less than 1 acre.

8 Sold as cane.

1 Estimated from number of vines or trees.

6 Including value of raisins, wine, etc.

6 Including value of cider, vinegar, etc.



11



Of the total value of crops, cereals contributed 40.5
per cent; hay and forage, 13.1 per cent; tobacco, 12.3
percent; miscellaneous vegetables, 8.0 per cent; forest
products, 6.5 per cent; orchard fruits, 4.5 per cent; po-
tatoes, 4.2 per cent; peanuts, 3.9 percent; sweet pota-
toes, 2.9 per cent; small fruits, 1.3 per cent; and all
other products, 2.8 per cent.

The average values per acre of the various crops are
as follows: Flowers and plants, $1,669; nursery prod-
ucts, $179; small fruits, $87; potatoes, $49; sweet po-
tatoes, $42; tobacco, $39; sorghum cane and sorghum
sirup, $24; broom corn, $20; peanuts, $19; cotton and
cottonseed, $15; orchard fruits, $13; hay and forage,
$13; dry beans, $10; dry pease, $10; and cereals, $8.

The crops yielding the highest average returns per
acre were grown upon very highly improved land.
Their production required a relatively great amount of
labor and large expenditures for fertilizers.

CEKEALS.

The following table is an exhibit of the changes in
cereal production since 1849.

Table 19.— ACREAGE AND PRODUCTION OF CEREALS:
1849 TO 1899.

PART 1.— ACREAGE.



YEAR. 1


Barley.


Buck-
wheat.


Com.


Oats.


Rye.


Wheat.


1899


2,768

2,051

869


19,251
5,170
16,463


1,910,085
1,600,690
1,768,127


« CD 4-


31,534
52, 063
48, 746


927,266
737,510
901,177


1889


1879





Part 2.— BUSHELS PRODUCED.



1899.



1879..
1869..
18592.
1849 2 .



53,340


244,321


36,748,410


3,269,430


246,834


40, 982


41,199


27,172,493


5,695,100


397,394


14,223


136,004


29,119,761


5,333,181


324, 431


7,259


45, 075


17,649,304


6,857,555


582,264


68,846


478,090


38,319,999


10, 186, 720


944,330


25,437


214, 898


35,264,319


10, 179, 144


458,930



8,907,510
7,904,092
7, 826, 174
7,398,787
13,130,977
11,212,616



i No statistics of acreage were secured prior to 1879.
'Including the territory now embraced in West Virginia.

Of the total land surface of the state, 12.3 per cent
was devoted to cereals in 1899. The total area in cere-
als was 2,892,992 acres in 1889, and 3,166,298 acres in
1899, an increase of 9.4 per cent. During the last ten
years the area in corn has increased 19.3 per cent;
wheat, 25.7 per cent; buckwheat, 272.4 per cent; and
barley, 35.0 per cent; while that in oats decreased 44.4
per cent, and that in rye, 39.4 per cent.

In 1899, 60.3 per cent of the total acreage in cereals
was devoted to corn; 29.3 per cent, to wheat; 8.7 per
cent, to oats; 1.0 per cent, to rye; and 0.7 per cent, to
buckwheat, barley, rice, and Kafir corn. Corn is the
most important, being reported by 156,703 farmers, or
93.3 per cent of the total number in the state. Pittsyl-
vania, Fauquier, Loudoun, Halifax, Caroline, and
Accomac counties, in the eastern part, report nearly
one-seventh of the total acreage in corn. Augusta and
Rockingham, in the north, contain more than one-
eighth of the wheat acreage and three-fifths of the bar-



ley acreage, while the southern counties of Bedford,
Franklin, Halifax, and Pittsylvania report one-fifth of
the acreage devoted to oats. Frederick and Carroll
counties lead in the production of rye, and Carroll,
Floyd, Grayson, and Smith counties, in the production
of buckwheat.

HAT AND FOEAGE.

In 1900, 115,910 farmers, or 69.0 per cent of the total
number, reported hay and forage crops, from which,
exclusive of cornstalks and corn strippings, they ob-
tained an average yield of 1.0 tons per acre. The total
area in hay and forage in 1899 was 612,962 acres, or 1.3
per cent greater than ten years before.

In 1899 the acreages and yields of the various kinds
of hay and forage were as follows: Wild, salt, and
prairie grasses, 2,696 acres and 2,922 tons; millet and
Hungarian grasses, 13,315 acres and 15,294 tons; alfalfa
or lucern, 349 acres and 521 tons; clover, 104,124
acres and 105,640 tons; other tame and cultivated
grasses, 442,070 acres and 437,436 tons; grains cut green
for hay, 40,531 acres and 44,329 tons; crops grown for
forage, 9,877 acres and 21,837 tons; and cornstalks and
corn strippings, 623,174 acres and 315,100 tons.

In Table 18 the production of cornstalks and corn
strippings is included under "hay and forage," but the
acreage is included under " corn," as the forage secured
was an incidental product of the corn crop.

TOBACCO.

According to the census of 1850, 56,803,227 pounds
of tobacco were produced in Virginia in 1849. In all
subsequent decades the crop has undergone great fluc-
tuations. The census of 1860 showed a gain over that
of 1850 of 67,165,085 pounds, or 118.2 per cent, but the
next census showed a decline of 86,881,948 pounds, or
70.1 per cent. Between 1870 and 1880 there was a gain
of 42,902,504 pounds, or 115.7 per cent, while the decade
between 1880 and 1890 was marked by another decline,
the loss being 31,466,213 pounds, or 39.3 per cent.

The present census shows that in 1899 tobacco was
grown in Virginia by 44,872 farmers, who obtained
from 184,334 acres a yield of 122,884,900 pounds. This
was a gain of 73,755 acres, or 66.7 per cent, over the
crop area of 1889, and an increase in production of
74,362,245 pounds, or 153.3 per cent, in the last ten
years. The total value of the crop was $7,210,195, an
average of $160.68 for each farm reporting. The aver-
age yield per acre in 1899 was 667 pounds, against 439
pounds in 1889, and 568 pounds in 1879. The average
area for each farm on which tobacco was grown was
4.1 acres.

The tobacco crop of 1899 was distributed over 88
counties of the state, the leading county being Pittsyl-
vania, with an area of 29,806 acres. The next in rank
was Halifax, and the third Mecklenburg. These three
counties together contributed 34.7 per cent of the
total acreage and 30.5 per cent of the total produc-



12



tion. The counties next in order were Bedford, Char-
lotte, Campbell, Henry, Amherst, Warren, Prince
Edward, Lunenburg, Franklin, and Appomattox.
These 13 counties together furnished 72.4 per cent of
the acreage and 70.3 per cent of the entire production
of the state.

COTTON.

The following table is a statement of the changes in
cotton production since 1859.

Table 20— ACREAGE AND PRODUCTION OF COTTON:
1859 TO 1899.





ACREAGE.


PRODUCTION.


YEAR. '


Total.


Per cent
of in-
crease.


Commer-
cial
bales.


Pounds.


Per cent
of in-
crease.


1S99


25,724
39,213
45, 040


'34.4
U2.9


10, 789
5,375
19, 595


5, 166, 630
2,563,875
8, 876, 535
79, 422
5,663,515


101 5


1889


2 71 1


1879


11,076.4
2 98. 6


18698




1859'





















] No statistics of acreage were secured prior to 1880.

2 Decrease.

'Including the territory now embraced in West Virginia.

In 1879, Virginia produced the largest crop of cotton
reported for that state by any census. The decrease
shown for 1869 was the direct result of the effects of
the Civil War. The decade ending in 1889 witnessed
another decrease in the production of cotton amounting
to 71.1 per cent.

In 1899, 4,761 farmers devoted an area of 25,724
acres, or 0.3 per cent of the total improved farm land
of the state to cotton, an average of 5.4 acres per farm.
From this land was produced 5,166,630 pounds of cot-
ton, an average of 201 pounds per acre. The total
value of this crop, including the value of the cotton
seed, was $381,548, an average of $80.14 per farm and
$14.83 per acre. This value constituted 0.5 per cent of
the gross farm income.

Of the 118 counties in the state, only 24 report cot-
ton. Those devoting the greatest area to this crop
were Brunswick, Greenesville, Southampton, Mecklen-
burg, and Sussex, ranking in the order named and re-
porting 91.1 per cent of the' total acreage. They are
located in the south central and southeastern parts of
the state.

ORCHARD FRUITS.

The changes in orchard fruits since 1890 are shown
in the following table:

Table 21.— ORCHARD TREES AND FRUITS: 1890 AND 1900.



Apples

Apricots

Cherries

Peaches " '

Pears

Plums and prunes .



NUMBER OF TREES.



S, 190, 025

2,950

269, 690

1,939,113
291, 288
118, 193



1S»0



4, 253, 364

1,793

132, 631

1,218,219

122, 917

16,022



BUSHELS OP FRUIT.



1809



', 835, 982
678
188,693
357, 339
88,400
21, 167



1889



8,391,425

1,024

100, 217

1, 052, 000

51,553

2,886



The total number of fruit trees in 1890 was 5,744,946,
while in 1900 there were 10,828,777, showing an in-
crease of 5,083,831, or 88.5 per cent. The rates of in-
crease for the several varieties are as follows: Plums
and prunes, more than sixfold; pears, 136.9 per cent;
cherries, 103.3 per cent; apples, 92. 6 per cent; apricots,
64.5 per cent; and peaches, 59.2 per cent.

Of the total number of trees reported in 1900, 75. 6
per cent were apple trees; 17-9 per cent, peach trees;
2.7 per cent, pear trees; 2.5 per cent, cherry trees; and
1.3 per cent, apricot, plum and prune, and unclassified
trees, the last class, which is not included in the table,
numbering 17,518 trees, and yielding 5,142 bushels of
fruit.

The value of orchard products, given in Table 18,
includes the value of 43,995 barrels of cider, 16,414
barrels of vinegar, and 2,302,480 pounds of dried and
evaporated fruits.

SMALL FRUITS.

The total area used in the cultivation of small fruits
in 1899 by the 11,147 farmers reporting them was 8,796
acres, an average of 0. 8 acres per farm. Of the total,
7,821 acres, or 88.9 per cent, were devoted to strawber-
ries, which yielded 12,270,300 quarts. Of this fruit, 72.4
per cent of the acreage and 73. 1 per cent of the yield
were reported by Norfolk, Princess Anne, and Accomac,
three extreme eastern counties bordering on Chesa-
peake Bay. The acreages and productions of the other
berries were as follows: Blackberries and dewberries,
•444 acres and 532,830 quarts; raspberries and Logan
berries, 365 acres and 424,110 quarts; gooseberries,
66 acres and 75,140 quarts; currants, 39 .acres and
42,060 quarts; and other small fruits, 61 acres and
79,480 quarts.

VEGETABLES.

The total value of vegetables grown in 1899, including
potatoes, sweet potatoes, and onions, was $9,083,274,
of which 27.5 per cent represents the value of potatoes;
18.9 per cent, that of sweet potatoes; 1.6 per cent, that
of onions, and 52.0 per cent, that of miscellaneous
vegetables.

Potatoes were grown in 1899 by 83,780 farmers, or
49.9 per cent of the total number in the state. The
area devoted to this crop in 1889 was 36,412 acres, and
that in 1899, 51,021 acres, a gain of 40.1 per cent.

In the growing of miscellaneous vegetables, 97.285
acres were used. Of this area, the products of 55,561
acres were not reported in detail. Of the remaining
41,724 acres, 10,105 acres were devoted to cabbages;
9,815 acres, to. tomatoes; 9,297 acres, to watermelons;
3,028 acres, to muskmelons; 2,015 acres, to sweet corn;
1,861 acres, to spinach; 1,603 acres, to cucumbers; 1,222
acres, to beans; 1,131 acres, to pease; and 1,647 acres, to
other vegetables.



13



PEANUTS.

Peanuts were grown in 1899 by 11,572 farmers, or
6.9 per cent of the total number in the state. The area
devoted to their cultivation was 116,914 acres, and the
product secured therefrom 3,713,347 bushels. Increases
of 98.3 per cent in acreage and 216.9 per cent in pro-
duction are shown for the last decade. The average
yield per acre was 19.9 bushels in 1889 and 31.8 in 1899.

The leading counties are Southampton, Nansemond,
Isle of Wignt, Sussex, and Prince George, ranking in
the order named, and reporting, in the aggregate, 76.3
per cent of the total acreage.

SORGHUM CANE.

The present census shows that in 1899 sorghum cane
was grown by 19,304 farmers on 8,039 acres, an aver-
age of 0.4 acres for each farm reporting. From this
area they sold 2,320 tons of cane for $6,012, and from
the remaining product manufactured 555,321 gallons of
sirup, valued at $190,903. This was a decrease in acre-
age from that of 1889 of 16.1 per cent. The total value
of sorghum-cane products of 1899 was $196,915, an
average of $10.20 for each farm reporting, and of
$24.50 per acre.

FLORICULTURE.

The area devoted to the cultivation of flowers and
ornamental plants in 1899 was 143 acres, and the value
of the products sold therefrom was $238,712. These
flowers and plants were grown by 134 farmers and flor-
ists, of whom 56 made commercial floriculture their
principal business. These 56 proprietors had invested
in land, buildings, implements, and live stock $427,913,
of which $256,375 represents the value of buildings.
Their sales of flowers and plants amounted to $191,845,
and they obtained other products valued at $5,145.
They expended for labor $44,350, and for fertilizers
$4,295. The average annual income for each farm
reporting, including products fed to live stock, was
$3,521.



In addition to the 56 principal florists' establishments,
3,028 farms and market gardens made use of glass in
the propagation of flowers, plants, or vegetables. They
had an area under glass of 2,887,643 square feet, mak-
ing, with the 596,617 square feet belonging to the flor-
ists' establishments, a total of 3,484,260 square feet of
land under glass.

NURSERIES.

The total value of the nursery products sold in 1899
was $214,988, reported by the operators of 89 farms.
Of this number 45 derived their principal income from
the nursery business. They had 5,138 acres of land,
valued at $338,790; buildings worth $90,175; imple-
ments and machinery worth $9,480; and live stock worth
$9,875. The value of their products in 1899, exclusive
of products fed to live stock, was $188,116, of which
$178,016 represents the value of nursery products and
$10,100 that of other products. The expenditure for
labor was $41,155, and for fertilizers, $4,609. The
average income for each farm reporting, including the
value of products fed to live stock, was $4,281.

LABOR AND FERTILIZERS.

The total expenditure for labor on farms in 1899,
including the value of board furnished, was $7,790,720,
an average of $46 per farm. The average expenditure
was $915 for nurseries, $792 for florists' establishments,
$134 for dairy farms, $112 for vegetable farms, $78 for
fruit farms, $53 for hay and grain farms, $44 for live-
stock farms, and $43 for tobacco farms. "Managers"
expended on an average $275; "owners," $48; "cash
tenants," $43; and "share tenants," $29. White farm-
ers expended $60 per farm and colofed farmers, $10.

Fertilizers purchased in 1899 cost $3,681,790, an av-
erage of $22 per farm and an increase since 1890 of
58.7 per cent. The average expenditure was $102 for
nurseries, $90 for vegetable farms, $77 for florists'
establishments, $34 for tobacco farms, $31 for dairy
farms, $30 for fruit farms, $21 for hay and grain farms,
and $14 for live-stock farms.



O




Twelfth Census of the United States.



Census Bulletin



No. 224.



WASHINGTON, D. C.



July 3, 1902.



AGRICULTURE.



MISSOURI.



Hon. William R. Mebriam,

Director of the Census.

Sir: I have the honor to transmit herewith, for pub-
lication in bulletin form, the statistics of agriculture
for the state of Missouri, taken in accordance with the
provisions of section 7 of the act of March 3, 1899.
This section requires that —

The schedules relating to agriculture shall comprehend the fol-
lowing topics: Name of occupant of each farm, color of occupant,
tenure, acreage, value of farm and improvements, acreage of differ-
ent products, quantity and value of products, and number and
value of live stock. All questions as to quantity and value of
crops shall relate to the year ending December thirty-first next
preceding the enumeration.

A "farm," as denned by the Twelfth Census, in-
cludes all the land, under one management, used for
raising crops and pasturing live stock, with the wood
lots, swamps, meadows, etc., connected therewith. It
also includes the house in which the farmer resides and
all other buildings used by him in connection with his
farming operations.

The farms of Missouri, Junel, 1900, numbered 284,886
and were valued at $843,979,213, of which amount
$148,508,490, or 17.6 per cent, represents the value of
buildings, and $695,470,723, or 82.4 per cent, the value
of the land and improvements other than buildings.
On the same date the value of farm implements and
machinery was $28,602,680, and of live stock,
$160,540,004. These values added to that of farms
give '$1,033,121,897, the " total value of farm property."

The products derived from domestic animals, poultry,
and bees, including animals sold and animals slaughtered
on farms, are referred to in this bulletin as "animal



products." The total value of such products, together
with the value of all crops, is termed "total value of
farm products." This value for 1899 was $219,296,970,
of which amount $97,841,944, or 44.6 per cent, repre-
sents the value of animal products, and $121,455,026,
or 55.4 per cent, the value of crops including forest
products cut or produced on farms. The total value
of farm products for 1899 exceeds that for 1889 by
$109,545,946, an increase of 99.8 per cent, but a part
of this gain is doubtless due to a more detailed enumer-
ation in 1900 than in 1890.

The "gross farm income" is obtained by deducting
from the total value of farm products the value of the
products fed to live stock on the farms of the producers.
In 1899 the reported value of products fed was
$57,952,360, leaving $161,344,610 as the gross farm
income. The ratio which this latter amount bears to
the "total value of farm property" is referred to as
the "percentage of gross income upon investment."
For Missouri, in 1899, it was 15.6 per cent.

As no reports of expenditures for taxes, interest,
insurance, feed for stock, and similar items have been
obtained by any census, no statement of net fa-rm
income can be given.

The statistics presented in this bulletin will be treated

in greater detail in the report on agriculture in the

United States. The present publication is designed tb

present a summarized advance statement for Missouri.

Very respectfully,

Chief Statistician for Agriculture.




AGRICULTURE IN MISSOURI.



GENERAL STATISTICS.



Missouri has a total land area of 68,735 square miles,
or 43,990,400 acres, of which 33,997,873 acres, or 77.3
per cent, are included in farms.

The surface of Missouri is divided into two unequal
portions by the Missouri River, which takes a zigzag
course from west to east across the state. That part



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