United States. Census Office (12th census : 1900).

Bulletins of the twelfth census of the United States : issued from October 6, 1900 to [October 20, 1902] ... number 4 [-247] online

. (page 195 of 222)
Online LibraryUnited States. Census Office (12th census : 1900)Bulletins of the twelfth census of the United States : issued from October 6, 1900 to [October 20, 1902] ... number 4 [-247] → online text (page 195 of 222)
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47-1




1,105

1,343

.1,052

19, 701

564

462


385
459,
364
6, 784
143
97


258

349

176

13,345

44

25


356
366
400
2,691
162
114


C62
734
658
9,008
425
334






29.1
33.0


Owners and tenant's^.




46.5
47.8





1 Including 2 Chinese.

In 1900, 21.2 per cent of the total acreage was oper-
ated by colored farmers, while less than 10 per cent
was actually owned by them. The value of the farms
operated by colored farmers was 19.1 percent of the
total state value of farm property, while the value of
farms actually owned by negroes was less than 5 per
cent. The large per cent of gross income shown in
Table 7 for colored farmers is due to the smaller size
and consequent more intensive cultivation of their
farms, and to the lower value of their farm property or
capital invested. It is also due in some degree to the
fact that in many cases the most productive part of the
plantations are rented in small areas to negroes and
appear as the farms of colored tenants, while larger
areas of less fertile land, comprising the remainder of
the plantation, appear as the farms of white owners.
The'valuable buildings are all on the part retained,
which tends to reduce the rate of income by increasing
the base used in the computation.

Farms conducted by share tenants have the smallest
average area, 39.1 acres, and those of managers the
largest, 941. 7 acres. The farms conducted by the last-
named class are, as a rule, favorably located and highly
improved, and the average values of the various forms
of farm property, shown in Table 7, are much larger
for this than for any other tenure group. The ratio
which the gross income of these farms bears to the
total value of farm property, however, is smaller than
for the other groups, owing to the high average valu-
ation of the land and buildings.

FARMS CLASSIFIED BY AREA.

Tables S and '.) present the principal statistics for
farms classified by area.



Table S.— NUMBER AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, AND
VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY, JUNE 1, 1900, CLASSI-
FIED BY AREA, WITH PERCENTAGES.





Number
of farms.


NUMBER OF ACRES IN
FARMS.


VALUE OF FARM
PROPERTY. ' ' 7




Aver-,
age!.


Total.


•Per
cerit.


Total.


Per
cent.


The State


115, 969


95.4


11, 059, 127


100.0


$198,536,906


100.0


Under 3 acres


992
4,730

20, 060 .

44, 622

18,179.

15, 633
4,839

. 4, 176
1,688
1,050


.. 1.5

6.7

.14:4

29.8

70.0

137.6

210.0

343.9

662.9

2,297.6


1,448
31,586

' 288,991
1,330,953
li 272, 079
2,150.489
1, 016; 191
1,435,925

' 1„118.940
2, 412, 525


(')

0.3

2.6

12.0

11.5

19.5

9.2

13.0

10.1

21.8


1, 593/073
2, 803, 705
9,623,871
30,208,673
20, 169, 566
21,191,849
10,870,306
16, 443, 391
18, 970, 368
66, 657, 104


■ 0.8
1.4


10 to 19 acres

20 to 49 acres

50 to 99 acres ........

100 to 1 74 acres

175 to 259 acres

260 to 499 acres

500 to 999 acres

1,000 acres and over .


4.8

15.2

10.2

10.7

5.5

8.3

9.5

33.6



1 Less than one-tenth of 1' per cent. '

Table 9.— AVERAGE VALUES OF SPECIFIED CLASSES OF
FARM PROPERTY, AND AVERAGE GROSS INCOME PER
FARM, WITH PER CENT OF GROSS INCOME ON TOTAL
INVESTMENT IN FARM PROPERTY, CLASSIFIED BY
AREA.





AVERAGE VALVES PER FARM OF—






Farm property, June 1, 1900.


Gross in-
come

(products
of 1899
not fed
to live
«tock).


Per cent
of gross
income


AREA.


Land and

improve-
ments Build-

(exeept j ings.
build- |
ings). !


Imple-
ments
and ma-
chinery.


Live
stock.


on total
invest-
ment in
, farm
property.


The State


$929 ! $288


$246


$249


$571


| 33.3




752 ' 524

310 , 166

275 ! 94

404 ! 109

629 1 190

756 i 237

1,318 | 379

2,271 | 696

6,124 , 1,907

30,966 j 9,740


62

23

19

29

51

66

116

314

1,950

18,648


268

94

92

135

239

297

433

657

1,260

4, 129


832

190

291

369

483

536

694

1,357

2,324

11,407


51.8
32.1
60.7
54.6
43.5
39.5
30.9
34.5
20.7
, 18.0






20 to 49 acres




100 to 174 acres

175 to 259 acres

260 to 499 acres

500 to 999 acres

1,000 acres and over . .



The group of farms of 1,000 acres and over contains
the largest percentage of the total farm area. Over
one-half of these farms are sugar or cotton plantations,
and 288 of them are operated by managers. They
report the highest average values of all forms of farm
property and products, but on account of the high
valuation of the property, the percentage of gross in-
come on total investment is smallest for this group,
though the gross income is in itself far in advance of
that of any other group.

For the two groups of farms containing less than 10
acres each the average values given in Table 9 are rela-
tively high, as these groups contain most of the florists'
establishments of the state and a number of city dairies,
poultry farms, and market gardens. It should be borne
in mind that the income from these industries depends
less upon the acreage of land used than upon the
amount of capital invested in buildings and implements,
and the amount expended for labor and fertilizers.



The average gross incomes per acre for the various
groups classified by area are as follows: Farms under
3 acres, $569.72; 3 to 9 acres, $28.51; 10 to 19 acres,
120.23; 20 to 49 acres, $12.38; 50 to 99 acres, $6.90;
100 to 174 acres, $3.90; 175 to 259 acres, $3.31; 260 to
499 acres, $3.95; 500 to 999 acres, $3.51; 1,000 acres
and over, $4.96.

FARMS CLASSIFIED BY PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF INCOME.

Tables 10 and 11 present the leading features of the
statistics relating to farms classified by principal source
of income. If the value of the hay and grain raised on
any farm exceeds that of any other crop, and constitutes
at least 40 per cent of the total value of products not fed
to live stock, the farm is classified as a "hay and grain"
farm. If vegetables are the leading crop, constituting
40 per cent of the value of the products, it is a "vege-
table" farm. The farms of the other groups are classi-
fied in accordance with the same general principle.
"Miscellaneous" farms are those whose operators do
not derive 40 per cent of their income from airy one
class of products. Farms with no income in 1899 are
classified according to the agricultural operations upon
other farms in the same locality.

Table 10.— NUMBER AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, AND
VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY, JUNE 1, 1900, CLASSIFIED
BY PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF INCOME, WITH PERCENT-
AGES.



PRINCIPAL SOURCE


Number
of farms.


NUMBER OF ACRES IX
FARMS.


VALUE OF FARM
PROPERTY.


OF INCOME.


Aver-
age.


Total.


Per
cent.


Total.


Per
cent.


The State


115,969 t


95.4


11,059,127


100.0


$198,536,906


100.0


Hay and grain


6,003 i
2,596 1
613 '
7,119 1
1,640
76
79,468 ;
2,733
3.870
40
15 1
11.790 1


101.8

55. 2

84.1

153. 1

90.7

CI. 3

71.9

103.1

312.6

3.8

140.3

139. 1


610,831

143, 326

51,560

1,089,753

149,256

4,886,

5,712,170

445,713

1,209,837

151

2.104

1,639; 540


5.5
1.3
0.5
9.9
1.4

(')
51.7

4.0
10.9

<')



14.8


11,913,632

3,995,789

861,297

13,263,763

4,708,806

123, 283

67,505,143

10,011,143

70,430,069

150; 720

94,830

15, 478, 431


6.0
2.0


Fruits


0.4




6.7


Dairy produce


2.4
0.1


Cotton

Rice


34.0
5.0




35.5


Flowers and plains..
Nursery products —
Miscellaneous


0.1

7.8



i Less than one-tenth of 1 per cent.



Table 11.— AVERAGE VALUES OF SPECIFIED CLASSES
OF FARM PROPERTY, AND AVERAGE GROSS INCOME
PER FARM, WITH PER CENT OF GROSS INCOME ON
TOTAL INVESTMENT IN FARM PROPERTY, CLASSIFIED
BY PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF INCOME.





AVERAGE VALUES PER FARM OF—






Farm property, June 1, 1900.


Gross in-
come

(products
of 1899
not fed
to live
stock).


Per cent
of gross
income


INCOME.


Land and
improve-
ments
(except
build-
ings).


Build-
ings.


Imple-
ments
and ma-
chinery.


Live
stock.


on total
invest-
ment in

farm
property.


The State


$929


$288


$246


$249


$571


33.3


Hay and grai:i


1,170
905
743
929

1,579
860
501

2, 460

8,544
■ 2,717

4,333
735


- 401
358
387
341
641
114

., 141

427

2,849

. 889

1,480

239


190

61

68

108

120

64

37

303

5,579

129

268

72


224
155
207
485
621
284

'. 170

467

1, 227

33

241

.267


279

508

549

368

846

508

422

1, 581

4,304

1,911

4,291

349


14.1






Livestock

Dairy produce..


19.8
29.6












23.6


Flowers and pla; t ...
Nursery products


50.7
67.9
26.6



For the several classes of farms the average values
per acre of products not fed to live stock are as follows:
For farms deriving their principal income from flowers
and plants, $506.16; nursery products, $30.59; sugar,
$13.77; rice, $9.70; dairy produce, $9.33; vegetables,
$9.21; tobacco, $7.91; fruits, $6.53; cotton, $5.87; hay
and grain, $2.74; miscellaneous, $2.51; and live stock,
$2.41.

The wide variations shown in the averages and in the
percentages of gross income are largely due to the fact
that in computing gross income no deduction is made
for expenditures. For florists' establishments, nurser-
ies, and market gardens the average expenditure for
such items as labor and fertilizers represents a far
larger percentage of the gross income than in the case,
of "hay and grain," "live stock," or "miscellaneous"
farms. Were it possible to present the average net
incomes, the variations shown would be comparatively
slight.



8



FARMS CLASSIFIED BY REPORTED VALUE OF PRODUCTS
NOT FED TO LIVE STOCK.

Tables 12 and 13 present data relating to farms classi-
fied \)y the reported value of products not fed to live
stock.

Table 12.— NUMBER AND ACREAGE OF FARMS, AND
VALUE OF FARM PROPERTY, JUNE 1, 1900, CLASSI-
FIED BY REPORTED VALUE OF PRODUCTS NOT FED
TO LIVE STOCK, WITH PERCENTAGES.



VALUE OF PRODUCTS


Number

of
farms.


NUMBER OF ACRES IN
FARMS.


VALUE OF FARM
PROPERTY.


STOCK.


Aver-
age.


Total.


Per
cent.


Total.


Per
cent.


The State


115,969


95.4


11,059,127


100.0


$198, 536, 906


100.0


SO


2, 285

5,039

7,447

32, 631

40, 302

20,117

5,721

2,427


55.9
46.1
49.3
58.3
72.4
106.7
212.1
886.8


127,744
232, 399
367, 437
1,901,788
2,917,805
2,146,264
1,213,432
2,152,258


1.1
2.1
3.3
17.2
26.4
19.4
11.0
19.5


1,888,580
2,568,180




SI lo $49 ...




$50 to $9J




$100 to $249




$250 to $499


35,491,014
31,658,672
21,365,840
82,084,140




$500 to $999




$1,000 to $2,499

$2,500 and over


10.8
41.3



Table 13.— AVERAGE VALUES OF SPECIFIED CLASSES
OF FARM PROPERTY, AND AVERAGE GROSS INCOME
PER FARM, WITH PER CENT OF GROSS INCOME ON
TOTAL INVESTMENT IN FARM PROPERTY, CLASSIFIED
BY REPORTED VALUE OF PRODUCTS NOT FED TO
LIVE STOCK.





AVERAGE VALUES PER FARM OF—






Farm property, June 1, 1900.


Gross
income
(prod-
ucts or
1899 not
fed to
live
stock).


Percent
of gross
income


NOT FED TO LIVE
STOCK.


Land and
improve-
ments
(except
build-
ings).


Build-
ings.


Imple-
ments
and ma-
chinery.


Live'
stock.


on total
invest-
ment in

farm
property.


The State


$929


$288


$246


$249


$571


33.3


$0


533
323
317
339
499
904
•2, 234
16,647


135

93

97

113

156

267

641

5,304


62
20
23
26
38
80
226
9,416


97

74

89

122

188

323

634

2,454






81 to $49


25

70

200

373

743

1,503

8,393


4.9
13.3
33.4
42.4
47.2
40.2
24.8


$50 to $99


$100 to $249


$250 to $4 99


$500 to $999


$1,000 to $2,499

$2,500 and over



The absence of income in the first group is due in
part to the fact that the enumerators could not always
secure complete reports for farms where changes in
ownership or tenancy had occurred shortly prior to
the date of enumeration. The persons in charge of
such farms on June 1, 1900, could not always give
definite information concerning the products of the
preceding year. The same statement is true, also, of
some of the farms with reported incomes of less than
$100. To this extent the reports fall short of giving a
complete statement of farm income in 1899.

LIVE STOCK.

At the request of the various live-stock associations
of the country, a new classification of domestic animals



was adopted for the census of 1900. The age grouping
for neat cattle was determined by their present and
prospective relations to the dairy industry and to the
supply of meat products. Horses and mules are classi-
fied by age, and neat cattle and sheep by age and sex.
The new classification permits very close comparison
with previous census reports.

Table 14 presents a summary of live-stock statistics.

Table 14.— DOMESTIC ANIMALS, FOWLS, AND BEES ON
FARMS, JUNE 1, 1900, WITH TOTAL AND AVERAGE
VALUES, AND NUMBER OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS NOT
ON FARMS.





Age in years.


ON FARMS.


NOT ON

FARMS.


LIVESTOCK.


Number.


Value.


. Aver-
age
value.


Number.




Under 1

1 and under 2.

2 and under 3.

3 and over

1 and over

1 and under 2.

2 and over

2 and over

Under 1

1 and under 2.

2 and over

Under 1

1 and under 2.

2 and over

All ages

Underl

1 and over

1 and over

All ages

All ages ..


169, 825
57,344
30, 094
26,589
10, 783
66,076
184,815
124,769

13,510

12, 076

168, 786

2,325

6,225

135,420

683

50, 610

114,414

54,820

788, 426


$817, 872
470, 339
343, 357
586, 360
207, 261
620, 250
3,607,033
1,928,524

166,312

274,190

6,184,115

52,950

293, 765

10, 290, 267

51,685

49, 746
185,840

97,454

1.494.284


$4.82
8.20
11.41
22.05
19.22
9.39
19.52
15.46

12. 31

22.71

36.64

22.77

47.19

75.99

75.67

0.98

1.62

1.78

1.90
0.93


7,380




1,618




870




3,117


Bulls


377




1,993


Cows kept for milk

Cows and heifers not

kept for milk.
Colts


12,449
1,532

556




534




25, 255




79




104




6,829


Asses and burros


270
346




960


Sheep (rams and
wethers).


793
24, 392


Goats


38, 308 35. 697


2,091


Fowls: 1


3, 890, 563
115, 921
169, 936
123,059
35,231


i 1,057,889
54,316


















1.54






















Value of all live




28,869,506














'



'The number reported is of fowls over 3 months old. The value is of all, old
and young.

2 Including Guinea fowls.

The value of all live stock on farms, June 1, 1900,
was $28,869,506. Of this amount, 36.8 per cent repre-
sents the value of mules; 23.0 per cent, that of horses;
17.2 per cent, that of neat cattle other than dairy cows;
12.5 per cent, that of dairy cows; 5.2 per cent, that of
swine; 3.7 per cent, that of poultry; and 1.6 per cent,
that of all other live stock.

No reports were secured of the value of live stock
not on farms, but it is probable that such animals have
higher average values than those on farms. Allowing
the same average values, however, the value of live
stock not on farms would be $1,962,128, and the total
value of live stock in the state, exclusive of poultry and
bees not on farms, would be approximately $30,831,634.

CHANGES IN LIVE STOCK ON FARMS.

The following table shows the changes since 1850
in the number of the most important classes of live
stock.



Table 15 — NUMBER OF SPECIFIED DOMESTIC ANIMALS
ON FARMS: 1850 to 1900.



YEAR.


Dairy

cows.


Other

neat

cattle.


Horses.


Mules
and asses.


Sheep.'


Swine.


1900


184 815
167 223
146.454
J02.076
129.662
105,576


485.480
413,880
324, 147
233, 185
387, 145
469, 766


194, 372
126, 777
104,428
59,738
78, 703
89,514


144,653
88,028
76,674
61,338
91,762
44,849


169, 234
186, 167
135,631
118,602
181,253
110,333




1890

1880

1870


788, 425
569,935
633, 489


I860


338, 326


1850


634,525




597, 361



1 Lambs not included.

In the Civil War decade all classes of live stock show
decreases in numbers, but by the year 1880 practically
all, with the exception of neat cattle, had regained the
numbers reported in 1850. Uninterrupted progress
since 1870 is shown in the numbers of all neat cattle,
horses, and mules. For the last decade increases in
number are as follows: Dairy cows, 10.5 per cent; other
neat cattle, 17.3 per cent; horses, 53.3 per cent; mules
arid asses, 64.3 per cent; and swine, 38.3 per cent. A
decrease of 9.1 per cent in the number of sheep is
shown for the last decade.

Although the enumerators in 1900 were instructed to
report no fowls under three months old, and no such
limitation was made in previous census reports, the last
decade shows the following increases in the numbers of
fowls: Ducks, 83. 4 per cent; chickens, 73.2 per cent;
turkeys, 55.2 per cent; and geese, 13.8 per cent.

ANIMAL PRODUCTS.

Table 16 is a summarized statement of the products
of the animal industry in 1899.

Table 16.— QUANTITIES AND VALUES OF SPECIFIED
ANIMAL PRODUCTS, AND VALUES OF POULTRY
RAISED, ANIMALS SOLD, AND ANIMALS SLAUGHT-
ERED ON FARMS IN 1899.



PBODICT9.



Wool

Mohair and goat hair.

Milk

Butter

Cheese

Eggs

Poultry

Honey

Wax

Animals sold

Animals slaughtered . .



Total.



Unit of measure.



Pounds .
Pounds .
Gallons.
Pounds .
Pounds .
Dozens .



Pounds .
Pounds .



Quantity.



547,641

385

'39,251,413

4,918,229

135, 104

12, 820, 290



426,490
20, 440



Value.



890, 317
92

24,168,015



281,713
425, 116

45, 200

072, 869
929, 437



10,012,759



1 Includes all milk produced, whether sold, consumed, or made into butter
or cheese.

'Includes the value of milk sold and consumed, and of butter and cheese
made.

The value of animal products in 1899 was $10,012,759,
or 13.8 per cent of the value of all farm products, and
15.1 per cent of the gross farm income. Of the total
value, 41.6 per cent represents the value of dairy prod-
ucts; 30.0 per cent, that of animals sold and animals
slaughtered on farms; 27.0 per cent, that of poultry
and eggs; 0.9 per cent, that of wool, mohair, and goat
hair; and 0.5 per cent, that of honey and wax.

No. 227 2



DAIRY PRODUCE.

In 1899, 1,646 farmers, or 1.4 per cent of all in the
state, derived their principal income from the sale of
dairy produce. Of the $4,168,015 given in Table 16, as
the value of all dairy produce, $3,059,959, or 73.4 per
cent, represents the value of such produce consumed
on farms, and $1,108,056, or 26.6 per cent, the receipts
from sales. Of the latter amount, $986,824 was re-
ceived from the sale of 4,356,979 gallons of milk;
$109,774, from 564,250 pounds of butter; $8,770, from
116;i77 pounds of cheese; and $2,688, from 3,853 gal-
lons of cream.

The great progress in dairying since 1890 is shown
by the fact that in 1900 more than three times as much
milk, twice as much butter and thirty-four times as
much cheese made on farms, were reported as in 1890.

ANIMALS SOLD AND ANIMALS SLAUGHTERED.

The value of animals sold and animals slaughtered on
farms in 1899 was $3,002,306, or 4.1 per cent of the value
of all farm products. Animals slaughtered were re-
ported by 48,339 farmers, or 41.7 per cent of all in the
state, the average value per farm being $39.91. Sales
of animals were reported by 17,600 farmers, or 15.2 per
cent, the average value per farm being $60.96. In ob-
taining these reports the enumerators were instructed
to secure from each farm operator a statement of the
amount received from sales in 1899, less the amount
paid for animals purchased during the same year.

POULTRY AND EGGS.

The production of eggs in 1899 was more than twice
as great as in 1889. The three parishes, St. Landry,
Vermilion, and Lafayette are first in poultry prod-
ucts, each reporting more than 800,000 dozen eggs for
the year 1899. The total value of poultry products
was $2,706,829, of which 52.6 per cent represents the
value of poultry raised, and 47.4 per cent, that of
eggs produced.

WOOL.

Each decade since 1870 shows an increased produc-
tion of wool, the product of 1899 being 106,955 pounds
greater than that of 1889, a gain of 24.3 per cent. The
following parishes in the southern part of the state,
ranking in the order named, report more than half the
state total of wool for 1899: Calcasieu, Vernon, St.
Tammany, St. Landry, Rapides, Tangipahoa, and
Washington.

HONEY AND WAX.

In 1899 there were reported 426,490 pounds of honey
and 20,440 pounds of wax, while in 1889 the production
was 271,962 pounds of honey and 8,584 pounds of wax.

HORSES, MULES, AND DAIRY COWS ON SPECIFIED CLASSES
OF. FARMS.

Table 17 presents, for the leading groups of farms,
the number of farms reporting horses, mules, and dairy



10



cows, and the average number of these animals per
farm. In computing the averages presented, only
those farms which report the kind of live stock under
consideration are included.

Table 17.— HORSES, MULES, AND DAIRY COWS ON SPECI-
FIED CLASSES OF FARMS, JUNE 1, 1900.





HORSES.


ML-LES.


DAIRY


cows.


CLASSES.


Farms
report-
ing.


Aver-
age per
farm.


Farms
report-
ing.


Aver-
age per
farm.


Farms

reporl>

ing.


Aver-
age per
farm.


Total


82,289


2.4


53,948


2.7


63, 967


2.9








48, 130
34, 159


2.8
1.8


24,858
29, 090


4.0
1.5


43, 270
20, 697


3.4


Colored farmers


1.9




40, 536

837

19, 360

21,556


2.8
5.4
1.9
1.9


22, 044

810

15, 145

15, 949


3.1

26.1

1.9

1.6


37, 957

711

11,782

13, 517


3.4




6.5




2.3




1.8








14,229

44, 857

12,942

4,127

6,134


1.7
2.1
2.6
3.1
4.8


8,688
29, 266
7,924
2,961
5,109


1.2
1.8
1.9
3.1
10.9


7,500

33, 529

12,855

4,258

5,825


2.7




2.3




3,1




3.8


260 acres and over


5.-3




4,098
1,873
508
6,322
1,469

52, 362
2,311
3,342

10,004'


2.2
1.8
. 1.9
3.7
3.1
2.1
4.0
3.1
2.6


2,110

729

115

2,714

441

39, 307

1,268

3,314

3,950


3.3
2.3
1.7
2.8
2.7
1.9
5.0
10.9
2.3


2,857
1,070
424
6,002
1,646
38,278
1,710
2,367
9,613


2.8




2.3


Frnit


2.8




3.5




9.6




2.5




3.1




3.1




3.1







1 Including " part owners" and " owners and tenants."

! Including tobacco farms, florists' establishments, and nurseries.

In Louisiana, as in all states where cotton is a staple
crop and much of the farm labor is performed by
negroes, large numbers of mules are used as work ani-
mals. For most classes of farms the average number
of mules exceeds that of horses. If the numbers of
horses and mules be combined, the average number of
work animals per farm compares favorably with the
corresponding figures for the more intensively culti-
vated farms of New England.

CROPS.

The following table gives the statistics of the prin-
cipal crops grown in 1899.

Table 18.— ACREAGE, QUANTITIES, AND VALUES OF
PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS IN 1899.



Corn

Wheat

Oats

Barley

Rye

Broom corn

Rice

Clover seed

Grass seed

Hay and forage .

Cottonseed

Cotton

Tobacco

Peanuts

Dry beans

Dry pease

Potatoes ,



Acres.



, 343, 756

214

28,033

16

55

107

201,685



97, 136



1,376,254

275

3,107

335

15, 190

9,220



Unit of
measure.



Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Pounds.
Pounds.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Tons....

Tons

Bales . . .
Pounds .
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.
Bushels.



Quantity.



22,062,580

2,345

316,070

110

372

41,120

172,732,430

7

264

248, 601

1 338, 388

709, 041

102, 100

45,713

3,371

146, 298

549, 280



Value.



$10, 327, 723

1,888

117, 312

61

323

2,130

4, 044, 489

35

465

1,353,118

3,481,669

23, 523, 143

20, 488

44,785

3,948

156, 843



, * Exclusive of 11,515 tons, valued at $118,490, sold in seed cotton and in-
cluded with the cotton.



Table 18.— ACREAGE, QUANTITIES, AND VALUES OF
PRINCIPAL FARM CROPS IN 1899— Continued.



CROPS.


Acres.


Unit of
measure.


Quantity.


Value.




27, 372

1,655

24,851

276, 966


Bushels

Bushels


1,865,482
152,683


$859, 733




106,426


Miscellaneous vegetables ..


1,647,424


Tons

Tons

Tons

Pounds

Gallons

Gallons

Tons

Gallons


3, 137, 338

1,038,496

1, 013, 984

156, 072, 199

6, 213, 859

1, 552, 641

11,160

48, 727






3,533,507






3,483,633






6,399,187






Online LibraryUnited States. Census Office (12th census : 1900)Bulletins of the twelfth census of the United States : issued from October 6, 1900 to [October 20, 1902] ... number 4 [-247] → online text (page 195 of 222)