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Capital: Colombo

Administrative divisions: 8 provinces; Central, North Central, North
Eastern, North Western, Sabaragamuwa, Southern, Uva, Western
note: North Eastern province may have been divided in two - Northern
and Eastern

Independence: 4 February 1948 (from UK)

National holiday: Independence and National Day, 4 February (1948)

Constitution: adopted 16 August 1978

Legal system: a highly complex mixture of English common law,
Roman-Dutch, Muslim, Sinhalese, and customary law; has not accepted
compulsory ICJ jurisdiction

Suffrage: 18 years of age; universal

Executive branch:
chief of state: President Chandrika Bandaranaike KUMARATUNGA (since 12
November 1994); note - Sirimavo BANDARANAIKE is the prime minister; in
Sri Lanka the president is considered to be both the chief of state
and the head of the government, this is in contrast to the more common
practice of dividing the roles between the president and the prime
minister when both offices exist
head of government: President Chandrika Bandaranaike KUMARATUNGA
(since 12 November 1994); note - Sirimavo BANDARANAIKE is the prime
minister; in Sri Lanka the president is considered to be both the
chief of state and the head of the government, this is in contrast to
the more common practice of dividing the roles between the president
and the prime minister when both offices exist
cabinet: Cabinet appointed by the president in consultation with the
prime minister
elections: president elected by popular vote for a six-year term;
election last held 21 December 1999 (next to be held NA December 2005)
election results: Chandrika Bandaranaike KUMARATUNGA reelected
president; percent of vote - Chandrika Bandaranaike KUMARATUNGA (PA)
51%, Ranil WICKREMASINGHE (UNP) 42%, other 7%

Legislative branch: unicameral Parliament (225 seats; members elected
by popular vote on the basis of a modified proportional representation
system by district to serve six-year terms)
elections: last held 16 August 1994 (next to be held by August 2000)
election results: percent of vote by party - PA 49.0%, UNP 44.0%, SLMC
1.8%, TULF 1.7%, SLPF 1.1%, EPDP 0.3%, UPF 0.3%, PLOTE 0.1%, other
1.7%; seats by party - PA 105, UNP 94, EPDP 9, SLMC 7, TULF 5, PLOTE
3, SLPF 1, UPF 1

Judicial branch: Supreme Court, judges are appointed by the president;
Court of Appeals, judges are appointed by the president

Political parties and leaders: All Ceylon Tamil Congress or ACTC
; Ceylon Workers Congress or CLDC ; Communist
Party ; Communist Party/Beijing or CP/B ;
Democratic People's Liberation Front or DPLF ; Democratic
United National (Lalith) Front or DUNLF ; Desha Vimukthi
Janatha Party or DVJP ; Eelam People's Democratic Party or
EPDP ; Eelam People's Revolutionary Liberation Front or
EPRLF ; Eelam Revolutionary Organization of Students or
EROS ; Janatha Vimukthi Peramuna or JVP ; Lanka
Socialist Party/Trotskyite or LSSP (Lanka Sama Samaja Party) [leader
NA]; Liberal Party or LP ; New Socialist Party or NSSP
(Nava Sama Samaja Party) ; People's Alliance or PA
; People's Liberation Organization
of Tamil Eelam or PLOTE ; People's United Front or MEP
(Mahajana Eksath Peramuna) ; Sri Lanka Freedom
Party or SLFP ; Sri Lanka Muslim
Congress or SLMC ; Sri Lanka People's Party or SLMP (Sri
Lanka Mahajana Party) ; Sri Lanka Progressive Front or SLPF
; Tamil Eelam Liberation Organization or TELO ;
Tamil United Liberation Front or TULF ; United National
Party or UNP ; Upcountry People's Front or UPF
; several ethnic Tamil and Muslim parties, represented in
either parliament or provincial councils

Political pressure groups and leaders: Buddhist clergy; labor unions;
Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam or LTTE (insurgent group fighting for
a separate state); radical chauvinist Sinhalese groups such as the
National Movement Against Terrorism; Sinhalese Buddhist lay groups

International organization participation: AsDB, C, CCC, CP, ESCAP,
FAO, G-24, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, ICFTU, ICRM, IDA, IFAD, IFC,
IFRCS, IHO, ILO, IMF, IMO, Inmarsat, Intelsat, Interpol, IOC, IOM,
ISO, ITU, NAM, OAS (observer), OPCW, PCA, SAARC, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO,
UNIDO, UNU, UPU, WCL, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WToO, WTrO

Diplomatic representation in the US:
chief of mission: Ambassador Warnasena RASAPUTRAM
chancery: 2148 Wyoming Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008
telephone: (202) 483-4025 through 4028
FAX: (202) 232-7181
consulate(s) general: Los Angeles
consulate(s): New York

Diplomatic representation from the US:
chief of mission: Ambassador Shaun E. DONNELLY
embassy: 210 Galle Road, Colombo 3
mailing address: P. O. Box 106, Colombo
telephone: (1) 448007
FAX: (1) 437345, 446013

Flag description: yellow with two panels; the smaller hoist-side panel
has two equal vertical bands of green (hoist side) and orange; the
other panel is a large dark red rectangle with a yellow lion holding a
sword, and there is a yellow bo leaf in each corner; the yellow field
appears as a border that goes around the entire flag and extends
between the two panels

@Sri Lanka:Economy

Economy - overview: In 1977, Colombo abandoned statist economic
policies and its import substitution trade policy for market-oriented
policies and export-oriented trade. Sri Lanka's most dynamic
industries now are food processing, textiles and apparel, food and
beverages, telecommunications, and insurance and banking. By 1996
plantation crops made up only 20% of exports (compared with 93% in
1970), while textiles and garments accounted for 63%. GDP grew at an
annual average rate of 5.5% throughout the 1990s until a drought and a
deteriorating security situation lowered growth to 3.8% in 1996. The
economy rebounded in 1997-98 with growth of 6.4% and 4.7% - but slowed
to 3.7% in 1999. For the next round of reforms, the central bank of
Sri Lanka recommends that Colombo expand market mechanisms in
nonplantation agriculture, dismantle the government's monopoly on
wheat imports, and promote more competition in the financial sector. A
continuing cloud over the economy is the fighting between the
Sinhalese and the minority Tamils, which has cost 50,000 lives in the
past 15 years.

GDP: purchasing power parity - $50.5 billion (1999 est.)

GDP - real growth rate: 3.7% (1999 est.)

GDP - per capita: purchasing power parity - $2,600 (1999 est.)

GDP - composition by sector:
agriculture: 21%
industry: 19%
services: 60% (1998)

Population below poverty line: 22% (1997 est.)

Household income or consumption by percentage share:
lowest 10%: 1.8%
highest 10%: 39.7% (1995-96 est.)

Inflation rate (consumer prices): 6% (1999 est.)

Labor force: 6.6 million (1998)

Labor force - by occupation: services 45%, agriculture 38%, industry
17% (1998 est.)

Unemployment rate: 9.5% (1998 est.)

Budget:
revenues: $2.7 billion
expenditures: $4.2 billion, including capital expenditures of $1.1
billion (1998 est.)

Industries: processing of rubber, tea, coconuts, and other
agricultural commodities; clothing, cement, petroleum refining,
textiles, tobacco

Industrial production growth rate: 6.3% (1998)

Electricity - production: 5.505 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity - production by source:
fossil fuel: 30.97%
hydro: 69.03%
nuclear: 0%
other: 0% (1998)

Electricity - consumption: 5.12 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity - exports: 0 kWh (1998)

Electricity - imports: 0 kWh (1998)

Agriculture - products: rice, sugarcane, grains, pulses, oilseed,
spices, tea, rubber, coconuts; milk, eggs, hides, beef

Exports: $4.7 billion (f.o.b., 1998)

Exports - commodities: textiles and apparel, tea, diamonds, coconut
products, petroleum products (1998)

Exports - partners: US 40%, UK 11%, Middle East 9%, Germany 5%, Japan
4% (1998)

Imports: $5.3 billion (f.o.b., 1998)

Imports - commodities: machinery and equipment, textiles, petroleum,
foodstuffs (1998)

Imports - partners: India 10%, Japan 10%, South Korea 8%, Hong Kong
7%, Taiwan 6% (1998)

Debt - external: $8.4 billion (1998)

Economic aid - recipient: $577 million (1998)

Currency: 1 Sri Lankan rupee (SLRe) = 100 cents

Exchange rates: Sri Lankan rupees (SLRe) per US$1 - 72.364 (January
2000), 70.402 (1999), 64.593 (1998), 58.995 (1997), 55.271 (1996),
51.252 (1995)

Fiscal year: calendar year

@Sri Lanka:Communications

Telephones - main lines in use: 494,509 (1998)

Telephones - mobile cellular: 228,604 (1999)

Telephone system: very inadequate domestic service, particularly in
rural areas; some hope for improvement with privatization of national
telephone company and encouragement to private investment; good
international service (1999)
domestic: national trunk network consists mostly of digital microwave
radio relay; fiber-optic links now in use in Colombo area and two
fixed wireless local loops have been installed; competition is strong
in mobile cellular systems; telephone density remains low at 2.6 main
lines per 100 persons (1999)
international: submarine cables to Indonesia and Djibouti; satellite
earth stations - 2 Intelsat (Indian Ocean) (1999)

Radio broadcast stations: AM 26, FM 45, shortwave 1 (1998)

Radios: 3.85 million (1997)

Television broadcast stations: 21 (1997)

Televisions: 1.53 million (1997)

Internet Service Providers (ISPs): 4 (1999)

@Sri Lanka:Transportation

Railways:
total: 1,463 km
broad gauge: 1,404 km 1.676-m gauge
narrow gauge: 59 km 0.762-m gauge (1996)

Highways:
total: 11,285 km
paved: 10,721 km
unpaved: 564 km (1998 est.)

Waterways: 430 km; navigable by shallow-draft craft

Pipelines: crude oil and petroleum products 62 km (1987)

Ports and harbors: Colombo, Galle, Jaffna, Trincomalee

Merchant marine:
total: 24 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 192,190 GRT/293,832 DWT
ships by type: bulk 1, cargo 16, container 1, petroleum tanker 1,
refrigerated cargo 5 (1999 est.)

Airports: 14 (1999 est.)

Airports - with paved runways:
total: 12
over 3,047 m: 1
1,524 to 2,437 m: 5
914 to 1,523 m: 6 (1999 est.)

Airports - with unpaved runways:
total: 2
1,524 to 2,437 m: 1
under 914 m: 1 (1999 est.)

@Sri Lanka:Military

Military branches: Army, Navy, Air Force, Police Force

Military manpower - military age: 18 years of age

Military manpower - availability:
males age 15-49: 5,251,045 (2000 est.)

Military manpower - fit for military service:
males age 15-49: 4,081,742 (2000 est.)

Military manpower - reaching military age annually:
males: 196,584 (2000 est.)

Military expenditures - dollar figure: $719 million (FY98)

Military expenditures - percent of GDP: 4.2% (FY98)

@Sri Lanka:Transnational Issues

Disputes - international: none

______________________________________________________________________



SUDAN

@Sudan:Introduction

Background: Military dictatorships promulgating an Islamic government
have mostly run the country since independence from the UK in 1956.
Over the past two decades, a civil war pitting black Christians and
animists in the south against the Arab-Muslims of the north has cost
at least 1.5 million lives in war and famine-related deaths, as well
as the displacement of millions of others.

@Sudan:Geography

Location: Northern Africa, bordering the Red Sea, between Egypt and
Eritrea

Geographic coordinates: 15 00 N, 30 00 E

Map references: Africa

Area:
total: 2,505,810 sq km
land: 2.376 million sq km
water: 129,810 sq km

Area - comparative: slightly more than one-quarter the size of the US

Land boundaries:
total: 7,687 km
border countries: Central African Republic 1,165 km, Chad 1,360 km,
Democratic Republic of the Congo 628 km, Egypt 1,273 km, Eritrea 605
km, Ethiopia 1,606 km, Kenya 232 km, Libya 383 km, Uganda 435 km

Coastline: 853 km

Maritime claims:
contiguous zone: 18 nm
continental shelf: 200-m depth or to the depth of exploitation
territorial sea: 12 nm

Climate: tropical in south; arid desert in north; rainy season (April
to October)

Terrain: generally flat, featureless plain; mountains in east and west

Elevation extremes:
lowest point: Red Sea 0 m
highest point: Kinyeti 3,187 m

Natural resources: petroleum; small reserves of iron ore, copper,
chromium ore, zinc, tungsten, mica, silver, gold, hydropower

Land use:
arable land: 5%
permanent crops: 0%
permanent pastures: 46%
forests and woodland: 19%
other: 30% (1993 est.)

Irrigated land: 19,460 sq km (1993 est.)

Natural hazards: dust storms

Environment - current issues: inadequate supplies of potable water;
wildlife populations threatened by excessive hunting; soil erosion;
desertification

Environment - international agreements:
party to: Biodiversity, Climate Change, Desertification, Endangered
Species, Law of the Sea, Nuclear Test Ban, Ozone Layer Protection
signed, but not ratified: none of the selected agreements

Geography - note: largest country in Africa; dominated by the Nile and
its tributaries

@Sudan:People

Population: 35,079,814 (July 2000 est.)

Age structure:
0-14 years: 45% (male 8,064,592; female 7,712,839)
15-64 years: 53% (male 9,300,886; female 9,290,340)
65 years and over: 2% (male 406,034; female 305,123) (2000 est.)

Population growth rate: 2.84% (2000 est.)

Birth rate: 38.58 births/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Death rate: 10.28 deaths/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Net migration rate: 0.05 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2000 est.)

Sex ratio:
at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female
under 15 years: 1.05 male(s)/female
15-64 years: 1 male(s)/female
65 years and over: 1.33 male(s)/female
total population: 1.03 male(s)/female (2000 est.)

Infant mortality rate: 70.21 deaths/1,000 live births (2000 est.)

Life expectancy at birth:
total population: 56.55 years
male: 55.49 years
female: 57.66 years (2000 est.)

Total fertility rate: 5.47 children born/woman (2000 est.)

Nationality:
noun: Sudanese (singular and plural)
adjective: Sudanese

Ethnic groups: black 52%, Arab 39%, Beja 6%, foreigners 2%, other 1%

Religions: Sunni Muslim 70% (in north), indigenous beliefs 25%,
Christian 5% (mostly in south and Khartoum)

Languages: Arabic (official), Nubian, Ta Bedawie, diverse dialects of
Nilotic, Nilo-Hamitic, Sudanic languages, English
note: program of Arabization in process

Literacy:
definition: age 15 and over can read and write
total population: 46.1%
male: 57.7%
female: 34.6% (1995 est.)

@Sudan:Government

Country name:
conventional long form: Republic of the Sudan
conventional short form: Sudan
local long form: Jumhuriyat as-Sudan
local short form: As-Sudan
former: Anglo-Egyptian Sudan

Data code: SU

Government type: transitional - previously ruling military junta;
presidential and National Assembly elections held in March 1996; new
constitution drafted by Presidential Committee, went into effect on 30
June 1998 after being approved in nationwide referendum

Capital: Khartoum

Administrative divisions: 26 states (wilayat, singular - wilayah);
A'ali an Nil, Al Bahr al Ahmar, Al Buhayrat, Al Jazirah, Al Khartum,
Al Qadarif, Al Wahdah, An Nil al Abyad, An Nil al Azraq, Ash
Shamaliyah, Bahr al Jabal, Gharb al Istiwa'iyah, Gharb Bahr al Ghazal,
Gharb Darfur, Gharb Kurdufan, Janub Darfur, Janub Kurdufan, Junqali,
Kassala, Nahr an Nil, Shamal Bahr al Ghazal, Shamal Darfur, Shamal
Kurdufan, Sharq al Istiwa'iyah, Sinnar, Warab

Independence: 1 January 1956 (from Egypt and UK)

National holiday: Independence Day, 1 January (1956)

Constitution: 12 April 1973, suspended following coup of 6 April 1985;
interim constitution of 10 October 1985 suspended following coup of 30
June 1989; new constitution implemented on 30 June 1998 partially
suspended 12 December 1999 by President BASHIR

Legal system: based on English common law and Islamic law; as of 20
January 1991, the now defunct Revolutionary Command Council imposed
Islamic law in the northern states; Islamic law applies to all
residents of the northern states regardless of their religion; some
separate religious courts; accepts compulsory ICJ jurisdiction, with
reservations

Suffrage: NA years of age; universal, but noncompulsory

Executive branch:
chief of state: President Lt. Gen. Umar Hasan Ahmad al-BASHIR (since
16 October 1993); First Vice President Ali Uthman Muhammad TAHA (since
17 February 1998), Second Vice President (Police) Maj. Gen. George
KONGOR AROP (since NA February 1994); note - the president is both the
chief of state and head of government
head of government: President Lt. Gen. Umar Hasan Ahmad al-BASHIR
(since 16 October 1993); First Vice President Ali Uthman Muhammad TAHA
(since 17 February 1998), Second Vice President (Police) Maj. Gen.
George KONGOR AROP (since NA February 1994); note - the president is
both the chief of state and head of government
cabinet: Cabinet appointed by the president; note - President BASHIR's
government is dominated by members of Sudan's National Islamic Front
(NIF), a fundamentalist political organization formed from the Muslim
Brotherhood in 1986; in 1998, the NIF created the National Congress as
its legal front; the National Congress/NIF dominates much of
Khartoum's overall domestic and foreign policies; President BASHIR
named a new cabinet on 20 April 1996 which includes members of the
National Islamic Front, serving and retired military officers, and
civilian technocrats; on 8 March 1998, he reshuffled the cabinet and
brought in several former rebel and opposition members as ministers;
he reshuffled his cabinet again on 24 January 2000 but announced few
changes
elections: president elected by popular vote for a five-year term;
election last held 6-17 March 1996 (next to be held NA 2001)
election results: Umar Hasan Ahmad al-BASHIR elected president;
percent of vote - Umar Hasan Ahmad al-BASHIR 75.7%; note - about forty
other candidates ran for president
note: BASHIR, as chairman of the Revolutionary Command Council for
National Salvation (RCC), assumed power on 30 June 1989 and served
concurrently as chief of state, chairman of the RCC, prime minister,
and minister of defense until 16 October 1993 when he was appointed
president by the RCC; upon its dissolution on 16 October 1993, the
RCC's executive and legislative powers were devolved to the president
and the Transitional National Assembly (TNA), Sudan's appointed
legislative body, which has since been replaced by the National
Assembly elected in March 1996; on 12 December 1999 BASHIR dismissed
the National Assembly during an internal power struggle between the
president and speaker of the Parliament Hasan al-TURABI

Legislative branch: unicameral National Assembly (400 seats; 275
elected by popular vote, 125 elected by a supra assembly of interest
groups known as the National Congress)
elections: last held 6-17 March 1996 (next scheduled for NA 2000)
election results: NA; the March 1996 elections were held on a nonparty
basis; parties are banned in the new National Assembly
note: on 12 December 1999, President BASHIR sent troops to take over
parliament

Judicial branch: Supreme Court; Special Revolutionary Courts

Political parties and leaders: political parties were banned following
30 June 1989 coup, however, political "associations" are allowed under
a new law drafted in 1998 and implemented on 1 January 1999 and
include - National Congress
note: the political association law is currently under review

Political pressure groups and leaders: National Islamic Front or NIF
(the National Congress operates as its legal front)

International organization participation: ABEDA, ACP, AfDB, AFESD, AL,
AMF, CAEU, CCC, ECA, FAO, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICRM, IDA, IDB,
IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, IGAD, ILO, IMF, IMO, Intelsat, Interpol, IOC, IOM,
ISO (correspondent), ITU, NAM, OAU, OIC, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO,
UNHCR, UNIDO, UNU, UPU, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WToO, WTrO (observer)

Diplomatic representation in the US:
chief of mission: Ambassador Mahdi Ibrahim MAHAMMAD (recalled to
Khartoum in August 1998)
chancery: 2210 Massachusetts Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20008
telephone: (202) 338-8565
FAX: (202) 667-2406

Diplomatic representation from the US: US officials at the US Embassy
in Khartoum were moved for security reasons in February 1996 and have
been relocated to the US Embassies in Nairobi, Kenya and Cairo, Egypt;
the US Embassy in Khartoum (located on Sharia Abdul Latif Avenue;
mailing address - P. O. Box 699, Khartoum; APO AE 09829; telephone -
(11) 774611 or 774700; FAX - (11) 774137) is kept open by
local employees; the US Embassy in Nairobi, Kenya is located in the
Interim Office Building on Mombasa Road, Nairobi; mailing address - P.
O. Box 30137, Box 21A, Unit 64100, APO AE 09831; telephone - (2)
751613; FAX - (2) 743204; the US Embassy in Cairo, Egypt is
located at (North Gate) 8, Kamel El-Din Salah Street, Garden City,
Cairo; mailing address - Unit 64900, APO AE 09839-4900; telephone -
(2) 3557371; FAX - (2) 3573200

Flag description: three equal horizontal bands of red (top), white,
and black with a green isosceles triangle based on the hoist side

@Sudan:Economy

Economy - overview: Sudan is buffeted by civil war, chronic political
instability, adverse weather, weak world commodity prices, a drop in
remittances from abroad, and counterproductive economic policies. The
private sector's main areas of activity are agriculture and trading,
with most private industrial investment predating 1980. Agriculture
employs 80% of the work force. Industry mainly processes agricultural
items. Sluggish economic performance over the past decade,
attributable largely to declining annual rainfall, has kept per capita
income at low levels. A large foreign debt and huge arrears continue
to cause difficulties. In 1990 the International Monetary Fund (IMF)
took the unusual step of declaring Sudan noncooperative because of its
nonpayment of arrears to the Fund. After Sudan backtracked on promised
reforms in 1992-93, the IMF threatened to expel Sudan from the Fund.
To avoid expulsion, Khartoum agreed to make token payments on its
arrears to the Fund, liberalize exchange rates, and reduce subsidies,
measures it has partially implemented. The government's continued
prosecution of the civil war and its growing international isolation
continued to inhibit growth in the nonagricultural sectors of the
economy during 1999. The government has worked with foreign partners
to develop the oil sector, and the country is producing approximately
150,000 barrels per day.

GDP: purchasing power parity - $32.6 billion (1999 est.)

GDP - real growth rate: 3% (1999 est.)

GDP - per capita: purchasing power parity - $940 (1999 est.)

GDP - composition by sector:
agriculture: 41%
industry: 17%
services: 42% (1997 est.)

Population below poverty line: NA%

Household income or consumption by percentage share:
lowest 10%: NA%
highest 10%: NA%

Inflation rate (consumer prices): 20% (1999 est.)

Labor force: 11 million (1996 est.)
note: labor shortages for almost all categories of skilled employment
(1983 est.)

Labor force - by occupation: agriculture 80%, industry and commerce
10%, government 6%, unemployed 4%

Unemployment rate: 30% (FY92/93 est.)

Budget:
revenues: $1.2 billion
expenditures: $1.3 billion, including capital expenditures of $NA
(2000 est.)

Industries: cotton ginning, textiles, cement, edible oils, sugar, soap
distilling, shoes, petroleum refining

Industrial production growth rate: 5% (1996 est.)

Electricity - production: 1.815 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity - production by source:
fossil fuel: 44.9%
hydro: 55.1%
nuclear: 0%
other: 0% (1998)

Electricity - consumption: 1.688 billion kWh (1998)

Electricity - exports: 0 kWh (1998)

Electricity - imports: 0 kWh (1998)

Agriculture - products: cotton, groundnuts (peanuts), sorghum, millet,
wheat, gum arabic, sesame; sheep

Exports: $580 million (f.o.b., 1999 est.)

Exports - commodities: cotton, sesame, livestock, groundnuts, oil, gum
arabic

Exports - partners: Saudi Arabia 24%, Italy 10%, Germany 5%, Egypt 5%,
France 3%, Japan 3%, China 1% (1998)

Imports: $1.4 billion (c.i.f., 1999 est.)

Imports - commodities: foodstuffs, petroleum products, manufactured
goods, machinery and transport equipment, medicines and chemicals,
textiles

Imports - partners: China 27%, France 14%, UK 10%, Germany 7%, Japan
4%, Netherlands 3%, Canada 1% (1998)

Debt - external: $24 billion (1999 est.)

Economic aid - recipient: $187 million (1997)

Currency: 1 Sudanese dinar (SD) = 100 piastres; note - in July 1999
the Sudanese Central Bank made the formal declaration that all
dealings with the Sudanese pound should stop

Exchange rates: Sudanese dinars (SD) per US$1 - 230.2 (1999), 172.2



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