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_#_Diplomatic representation: none (British crown dependency)


_#_Flag: white with the red cross of Saint George (patron saint of
England) extending to the edges of the flag


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: Tourism is a major source of revenue. Other economic
activity includes financial services, breeding the world-famous
Guernsey cattle, and growing tomatoes and flowers for export.


_#_GDP: $NA, per capita $NA; real growth rate 9% (1987)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 7% (1988)


_#_Unemployment rate: NA%


_#_Budget: revenues $208.9 million; expenditures $173.9 million,
including capital expenditures of NA (1988)


_#_Exports: $NA;

commodities - tomatoes, flowers and ferns, sweet peppers, eggplant,
other vegetables;

partners - UK (regarded as internal trade)


_#_Imports: $NA;

commodities - coal, gasoline and oil;

partners - UK (regarded as internal trade)


_#_External debt: $NA


_#_Industrial production: growth rate NA%


_#_Electricity: 173,000 kW capacity; 525 million kWh produced,
9,340 kWh per capita (1989)


_#_Industries: tourism, banking


_#_Agriculture: tomatoes, flowers (mostly grown in greenhouses),
sweet peppers, eggplant, other vegetables and fruit; Guernsey cattle


_#_Economic aid: none


_#_Currency: Guernsey pound (plural - pounds);
1 Guernsey (5G) pound = 100 pence


_#_Exchange rates: Guernsey pounds (5G) per US$1 - 0.5171 (January
1991), 0.5603 (1990), 0.6099 (1989), 0.5614 (1988), 0.6102 (1987), 0.6817
(1986), 0.7714 (1985); note - the Guernsey pound is at par with the
British pound


_#_Fiscal year: calendar year


_*_Communications
_#_Ports: Saint Peter Port, Saint Sampson


_#_Airport: 1 with permanent-surface runway 1,220-2,439 m (La
Villiaze)


_#_Telecommunications: stations - 1 AM, no FM, 1 TV; 41,900
telephones; 1 submarine cable


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Note: defense is the responsibility of the UK
_%_
[email protected]_Guinea
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 245,860 km2; land area: 245,860 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly smaller than Oregon


_#_Land boundaries: 3,399 km total; Guinea-Bissau 386 km, Ivory Coast
610 km, Liberia 563 km, Mali 858 km, Senegal 330 km, Sierra Leone 652 km


_#_Coastline: 320 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Exclusive economic zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 12 nm


_#_Climate: generally hot and humid; monsoonal-type rainy season
(June to November) with southwesterly winds; dry season (December to
May) with northeasterly harmattan winds


_#_Terrain: generally flat coastal plain, hilly to mountainous
interior


_#_Natural resources: bauxite, iron ore, diamonds, gold, uranium,
hydropower, fish


_#_Land use: arable land 6%; permanent crops NEGL%; meadows and
pastures 12%; forest and woodland 42%; other 40%; includes irrigated
NEGL%


_#_Environment: hot, dry, dusty harmattan haze may reduce visibility
during dry season; deforestation


_*_People
_#_Population: 7,455,850 (July 1991), growth rate 2.5% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 47 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 21 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: 0 migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 144 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 41 years male, 45 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 6.0 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Guinean(s); adjective - Guinean


_#_Ethnic divisions: Fulani 35%, Malinke 30%, Soussou 20%, small
indigenous tribes 15%


_#_Religion: Muslim 85%, Christian 8%, indigenous beliefs 7%


_#_Language: French (official); each tribe has its own language


_#_Literacy: 24% (male 35%, female 13%) age 15 and over can
read and write (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 2,400,000 (1983); agriculture 82.0%, industry and
commerce 11.0%, services 5.4%; 88,112 civil servants (1987); 52% of
population of working age (1985)


_#_Organized labor: virtually 100% of wage earners loosely affiliated
with the National Confederation of Guinean Workers


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Republic of Guinea


_#_Type: republic


_#_Capital: Conakry


_#_Administrative divisions: 29 administrative regions (regions
administratives, singular - region administrative); Beyla, Boffa,
Boke, Conakry, Dabola, Dalaba, Dinguiraye, Dubreka, Faranah,
Forecariah, Fria, Gaoual, Gueckedou, Kankan, Kerouane, Kindia,
Kissidougou, Koundara, Kouroussa, Labe, Macenta, Mali, Mamou,
Nzerekore, Pita, Siguiri, Telimele, Tougue, Yomou


_#_Independence: 2 October 1958 (from France; formerly French Guinea)


_#_Constitution: 23 December 1990 (Loi Fundamentale)


_#_Legal system: based on French civil law system, customary law,
and decree; legal codes currently being revised; has not accepted
compulsory ICJ jurisdiction


_#_National holiday: Anniversary of the Second Republic, 3 April
(1984)


_#_Executive branch: president, Transitional Committee for National
Recovery (Comite Transitionale de Redressement National or CTRN)
replaced the Military Committee for National Recovery (Comite
Militaire de Redressement National or CMRN); Council of Ministers
(cabinet)


_#_Legislative branch: People's National Assembly (Assemblee
Nationale Populaire) was dissolved after the 3 April 1984 coup


_#_Judicial branch: Court of Appeal (Cour d'Appel)


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State and Head of Government - Gen. Lansana CONTE (since
5 April 1984)


_#_Political parties and leaders: none; following the 3 April 1984
coup all political activity was banned


_#_Suffrage: none


_#_Elections: none


_#_Communists: no Communist party, although there are some
sympathizers


_#_Member of: ACCT, ACP, AfDB, CEAO (observer), ECA, ECOWAS, FAO, FZ,
G-77, IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INTELSAT, INTERPOL,
IOC, ISO (correspondent), ITU, LORCS, NAM, OAU, OIC, UN,
UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCL, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador (vacant); Chancery at
2112 Leroy Place NW, Washington DC 20008; telephone (202) 483-9420;

US - Ambassador Dane F. SMITH, Jr.; Embassy at 2nd Boulevard and 9th
Avenue, Conakry (mailing address is B. P. 603, Conakry); telephone (224)
44-15-20 through 24


_#_Flag: three equal vertical bands of red (hoist side), yellow, and
green; uses the popular pan-African colors of Ethiopia; similar to the
flag of Rwanda which has a large black letter R centered in the
yellow band


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: Although possessing many natural resources and
considerable potential for agricultural development, Guinea is one of the
poorest countries in the world. The agricultural sector contributes about
40% to GDP and employs more than 80% of the work force, while industry
accounts for 27% of GDP. Guinea possesses over 25% of theworld's
bauxite reserves; exports of bauxite and alumina accounted for
about 70% of total exports in 1989.


_#_GDP: $2.7 billion, per capita $380; real growth rate 4.4%
(1989 est.)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 28.2% (1989 est.)


_#_Unemployment rate: NA%


_#_Budget: revenues $394 million; expenditures $548 million, including
capital expenditures of $254 million (1989 est.)


_#_Exports: $645 million (f.o.b., 1989 est.);

commodities - alumina, bauxite, diamonds, coffee, pineapples,
bananas, palm kernels;

partners - US 33%, EC 33%, USSR and Eastern Europe 20%, Canada


_#_Imports: $551 million (c.i.f., 1989 est.);

commodities - petroleum products, metals, machinery, transport
equipment, foodstuffs, textiles and other grain;

partners - US 16%, France, Brazil


_#_External debt: $2.6 billion (1990 est.)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate NA%; accounts for 27% of GDP


_#_Electricity: 113,000 kW capacity; 300 million kWh produced,
40 kWh per capita (1989)


_#_Industries: bauxite mining, alumina, gold, diamond mining,
light manufacturing and agricultural processing industries


_#_Agriculture: accounts for 40% of GDP (includes fishing and
forestry); mostly subsistence farming; principal products - rice, coffee,
pineapples, palm kernels, cassava, bananas, sweet potatoes, timber;
livestock - cattle, sheep and goats; not self-sufficient in food grains


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $227
million; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-87), $1,075 million; OPEC bilateral aid (1979-89), $120 million;
Communist countries (1970-88), $446 million


_#_Currency: Guinean franc (plural - francs);
1 Guinean franc (FG) = 100 centimes


_#_Exchange rates: Guinean francs (FG) per US$1 - 24.39 (1989),
19.23 (1988), 17.54 (1987), 14.29 (1986), NA (1985)


_#_Fiscal year: calendar year


_*_Communications
_#_Railroads: 1,045 km; 806 km 1.000-meter gauge, 239 km 1.435-meter
standard gauge


_#_Highways: 30,100 km total; 1,145 km paved, 12,955 km gravel or
laterite (of which barely 4,500 km are currently all-weather roads),
16,000 km unimproved earth (1987)


_#_Inland waterways: 1,295 km navigable by shallow-draft native craft


_#_Ports: Conakry, Kamsar


_#_Civil air: 2 major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 16 total, 16 usable; 5 with permanent-surface runways;
none with runways over 3,659 m; 2 with runways 2,440-3,659 m;
10 with runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: fair system of open-wire lines, small
radiocommunication stations, and new radio relay system; 10,000
telephones; stations - 3 AM, 1 FM, 1 TV; 12,000 TV sets; 125,000 radio
receivers; 1 Atlantic Ocean INTELSAT earth station


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: Army, Navy (acts primarily as a coast guard), Air Force,
Republican Guard, paramilitary National Gendarmerie, Surete Nationale


_#_Manpower availability: males 15-49, 1,695,832; 853,593 fit for
military service


_#_Defense expenditures: $27 million, 1.2% of GDP (1988)
_%_
[email protected]_Guinea-Bissau
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 36,120 km2; land area: 28,000 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly less than three times the size of
Connecticut


_#_Land boundaries: 724 km total; Guinea 386, Senegal 338 km


_#_Coastline: 350 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Exclusive economic zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 12 nm


_#_Disputes: the International Court of Justice (ICJ) has rendered its
decision on the Guinea-Bissau/Senegal maritime boundary (in favor
of Senegal) - that decision has been rejected by Guinea-Bissau


_#_Climate: tropical; generally hot and humid; monsoon-type rainy
season (June to November) with southwesterly winds; dry season (December
to May) with northeasterly harmattan winds


_#_Terrain: mostly low coastal plain rising to savanna in east


_#_Natural resources: unexploited deposits of petroleum, bauxite,
phosphates; fish, timber


_#_Land use: arable land 11%; permanent crops 1%; meadows and pastures
43%; forest and woodland 38%; other 7%


_#_Environment: hot, dry, dusty harmattan haze may reduce visibility
during dry season


_*_People
_#_Population: 1,023,544 (July 1991), growth rate 2.4% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 42 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 18 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: 0 migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 125 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 45 years male, 48 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 5.8 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Guinea-Bissauan(s); adjective - Guinea-Bissauan


_#_Ethnic divisions: African about 99% (Balanta 30%, Fula 20%, Manjaca
14%, Mandinga 13%, Papel 7%); European and mulatto less than 1%


_#_Religion: indigenous beliefs 65%, Muslim 30%, Christian 5%


_#_Language: Portuguese (official); Criolo and numerous African
languages


_#_Literacy: 36% (male 50%, female 24%) age 15 and over can
read and write (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 403,000 (est.); agriculture 90%, industry, services,
and commerce 5%, government 5%; population of working age 53% (1983)


_#_Organized labor: only one trade union - the National Union of
Workers of Guinea-Bissau (UNTG)


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Republic of Guinea-Bissau


_#_Type: republic; highly centralized one-party regime since September
1974; the African Party for the Independence of Guinea-Bissau and Cape
Verde (PAIGC) held an extraordinary party congress in December 1990 and
established a two-year transition program during which the constitution
will be revised, allowing for multiple political parties and a
presidential election in 1993


_#_Capital: Bissau


_#_Administrative divisions: 9 regions (regioes,
singular - regiao); Bafata, Biombo, Bissau, Bolama, Cacheu, Gabu,
Oio, Quinara, Tombali


_#_Independence: 24 September 1973 (from Portugal; formerly Portuguese
Guinea)


_#_Constitution: 16 May 1984


_#_Legal system: NA


_#_National holiday: Independence Day, 24 September (1973)


_#_Executive branch: president of the Council of State, vice
presidents of the Council of State, Council of State, Council of
Ministers (cabinet)


_#_Legislative branch: unicameral National People's Assembly
(Assembleia Nacional Popular)


_#_Judicial branch: none; there is a Ministry of Justice in the
Council of Ministers


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State and Head of Government - President of the
Council of State Brig. Gen. Joao Bernardo VIEIRA (assumed power 14
November 1980 and elected President of Council of State on 16 May 1984);
First Vice President Col. Iafai CAMARA (since 7 November 1985); Second
Vice President Vasco CABRAL (since 21 June 1989)


_#_Political parties and leaders: only party - African Party for the
Independence of Guinea-Bissau and Cape Verde (PAIGC), President
Joao Bernardo VIEIRA, leader; the party decided to retain the
binational title despite its formal break with Cape Verde


_#_Suffrage: universal at age 15


_#_Elections:

President of Council of State - last held 19 June 1989
(next to be held NA 1993);
results - Brig. Gen. Joao Bernardo VIEIRA was reelected without
opposition by the National People's Assembly;

National People's Assembly - last held 15 June 1989 (next
to be held 15 June 1994);
results - PAIGC is the only party;
seats - (150 total) PAIGC 150, appointed by Regional Councils


_#_Communists: a few Communists, some sympathizers


_#_Member of: ACCT (associate), ACP, AfDB, ECA, ECOWAS, FAO, G-77,
IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, IOM (observer), ITU,
LORCS, NAM, OAU, OIC, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WFTU,
WHO, WIPO, WMO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador Alfredo Lopes CABRAL;
Chancery (temporary) at the Guinea-Bissauan Permanent Mission to the UN,
Suite 604, 211 East 43rd Street, New York, NY 10017; telephone (212)
661-3977;

US - Ambassador William L. JACOBSEN, Jr.; Embassy at 17 Avenida
Domingos Ramos, Bissau (mailing address is 1067 Bissau Codex, Bissau,
Guinea-Bissau); telephone [245] 20-1139, 20-1145, 20-1113


_#_Flag: two equal horizontal bands of yellow (top) and green with a
vertical red band on the hoist side; there is a black five-pointed star
centered in the red band; uses the popular pan-African colors of
Ethiopia; similar to the flag of Cape Verde which has the black star
raised above the center of the red band and is framed by two corn stalks
and a yellow clam shell


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: Guinea-Bissau ranks among the poorest countries in the
world, with a per capita GDP below $200. Agriculture and fishing are the
main economic activities, with cashew nuts, peanuts, and palm kernels the
primary exports. Exploitation of known mineral deposits is unlikely at
present because of a weak infrastructure and the high cost of
development. The government's four-year plan (1988-91) has targeted
agricultural development as the top priority.


_#_GDP: $154 million, per capita $160; real growth rate 5.0% (1989)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 25% (1990 est.)


_#_Unemployment rate: NA%


_#_Budget: revenues $22.7 million; expenditures $30.8 million,
including capital expenditures of $18.0 million (1989 est.)


_#_Exports: $14.2 million (f.o.b., 1989 est.);

commodities - cashews, fish, peanuts, palm kernels;

partners - Portugal, Senegal, France, The Gambia, Netherlands,
Spain


_#_Imports: $68.9 million (f.o.b., 1989 est.);

commodities - capital equipment, consumer goods, semiprocessed
goods, foods, petroleum;

partners - Portugal, Netherlands, Senegal, USSR, Germany


_#_External debt: $462 million (December 1990 est.)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate - 1.0% (1989 est.); accounts
for 10% of GDP (1989 est.)


_#_Electricity: 22,000 kW capacity; 28 million kWh produced,
30 kWh per capita (1989)


_#_Industries: agricultural processing, beer, soft drinks


_#_Agriculture: accounts for over 50% of GDP, nearly 100% of exports,
and 90% of employment; rice is the staple food; other crops include
corn, beans, cassava, cashew nuts, peanuts, palm kernels, and cotton; not
self-sufficient in food; fishing and forestry potential not fully
exploited


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $49
million; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-88), $561 million; OPEC bilateral aid (1979-89), $41 million;
Communist countries (1970-89), $68 million


_#_Currency: Guinea-Bissauan peso (plural - pesos);
1 Guinea-Bissauan peso (PG) = 100 centavos


_#_Exchange rates: Guinea-Bissauan pesos (PG) per US$1 - 1987.2 (1989),
1363.6 (1988), 851.65 (1987), 238.98 (1986), 173.61 (1985)


_#_Fiscal year: calendar year


_*_Communications
_#_Highways: 3,218 km; 2,698 km bituminous, remainder earth


_#_Inland waterways: scattered stretches are important to coastal
commerce


_#_Ports: Bissau


_#_Civil air: 2 major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 37 total, 18 usable; 5 with permanent-surface runways;
none with runways over 3,659 m; 1 with runways 2,440-3,659 m;
5 with runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: poor system of radio relay, open-wire lines,
and radiocommunications; 3,000 telephones; stations - 1 AM, 2 FM, 1 TV; 1
Atlantic Ocean INTELSAT earth station


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: People's Revolutionary Armed Force (FARP; including
Army, Navy, Air Force), paramilitary force


_#_Manpower availability: males 15-49, 222,371; 126,797 fit for
military service


_#_Defense expenditures: $5 million, 3.2% of GDP (1987)
_%_
[email protected]_Guyana
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 214,970 km2; land area: 196,850 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly smaller than Idaho


_#_Land boundaries: 2,462 km total; Brazil 1,119 km, Suriname 600 km,
Venezuela 743 km


_#_Coastline: 459 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Continental shelf: outer edge of continental margin or 200 nm;

Exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 12 nm


_#_Disputes: all of the area west of the Essequibo river claimed by
Venezuela; Suriname claims area between New (Upper Courantyne) and
Courantyne/Kutari Rivers (all headwaters of the Courantyne)


_#_Climate: tropical; hot, humid, moderated by northeast trade winds;
two rainy seasons (May to mid-August, mid-November to mid-January)


_#_Terrain: mostly rolling highlands; low coastal plain; savanna in
south


_#_Natural resources: bauxite, gold, diamonds, hardwood timber,
shrimp, fish


_#_Land use: arable land 3%; permanent crops NEGL%; meadows and
pastures 6%; forest and woodland 83%; other 8%; includes irrigated 1%


_#_Environment: flash floods a constant threat during rainy seasons;
water pollution


_*_People
_#_Population: 749,508 (July 1991), growth rate - 0.4% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 23 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 7 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: - 20 migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 51 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 61 years male, 68 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 2.6 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Guyanese (sing., pl.); adjective - Guyanese


_#_Ethnic divisions: East Indian 51%, black and mixed 43%, Amerindian
4%, European and Chinese 2%


_#_Religion: Christian 57%, Hindu 33%, Muslim 9%, other 1%


_#_Language: English, Amerindian dialects


_#_Literacy: 95% (male 98%, female 96%) age 15 and over having ever
attended school (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 268,000; industry and commerce 44.5%, agriculture
33.8%, services 21.7%; public-sector employment amounts to 60-80%
of the total labor force (1985)


_#_Organized labor: 34% of labor force


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Co-operative Republic of Guyana


_#_Type: republic


_#_Capital: Georgetown


_#_Administrative divisions: 10 regions; Barima-Waini,
Cuyuni-Mazaruni, Demerara-Mahaica, East Berbice-Corentyne, Essequibo
Islands-West Demerara, Mahaica-Berbice, Pomeroon-Supenaam,
Potaro-Siparuni, Upper Demerara-Berbice, Upper Takutu-Upper Essequibo


_#_Independence: 26 May 1966 (from UK; formerly British Guiana)


_#_Constitution: 6 October 1980


_#_Legal system: based on English common law with certain admixtures
of Roman-Dutch law; has not accepted compulsory ICJ jurisdiction


_#_National holiday: Republic Day, 23 February (1970)


_#_Executive branch: executive president, first vice president,
prime minister, first deputy prime minister, Cabinet


_#_Legislative branch: unicameral National Assembly


_#_Judicial branch: Supreme Court of Judicature


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State - Executive President Hugh Desmond HOYTE (since 6
August 1985); First Vice President Hamilton GREEN (since 6 August 1985);

Head of Government - Prime Minister Hamilton GREEN (since
NA August 1985)


_#_Political parties and leaders:
People's National Congress (PNC), Hugh Desmond HOYTE;
People's Progressive Party (PPP), Cheddi JAGAN;
Working People's Alliance (WPA), Eusi KWAYANA, Rupert ROOPNARINE, Moses
BHAGWAN;
Democratic Labor Movement (DLM), Paul TENNASSEE;
People's Democratic Movement (PDM), Llewellyn JOHN;
National Democratic Front (NDF), Joseph BACCHUS;
United Force (UF), Marcellus Feilden SINGH;
United Republican Party (URP), Leslie RAMSAMMY;
National Republican Party (NRP), Robert GANGADEEN


_#_Suffrage: universal at age 18


_#_Elections:

Executive President - last held on 9 December 1985 (next to be
held mid-1991); Hugh Desmond HOYTE was elected president (the
leader of the party with the most votes in the National Assembly
elections);

National Assembly - last held on 9 December 1985 (next to be held
mid-1991);
results - PNC 78%, PPP 16%, UF 4%, WPA 2%;
seats - (65 total, 53 elected) PNC 42, PPP 8, UF 2, WPA 1


_#_Communists: 100 (est.) hardcore within PPP; top echelons of PPP
and PYO (Progressive Youth Organization, militant wing of the PPP)
include many Communists; small but unknown number of orthodox
Marxist-Leninists within PNC, some of whom formerly belonged to the PPP


_#_Other political or pressure groups: Trades Union Congress (TUC);
Guyanese Action for Reform and Democracy (GUARD) includes various labor
groups as well as several of the smaller parties; Guyana Council of
Indian Organizations (GCIO); Civil Liberties Action Committee (CLAC);
the latter two organizations are small and active but not well
organized; Guyanese Action for Reform and Democracy (GUARD) includes
various labor groups, as well as several of the smaller political
parties


_#_Member of: ACP, C, CARICOM, CCC, CDB, ECLAC, FAO, G-77, GATT, IADB,
IBRD, ICAO, ICFTU, IDA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INTERPOL, IOC, ITU,
LAES, LORCS, NAM, OAS, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WCL, WFTU, WHO,
WMO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador Dr. Cedric Hilburn GRANT;
Chancery at 2490 Tracy Place NW, Washington DC 20008; telephone (202)
265-6900; there is a Guyanese Consulate General in New York;

US - Ambassador George JONES; Embassy at 31 Main Street,
Georgetown; telephone [592] (02) 54900 through 54909


_#_Flag: green with a red isosceles triangle (based on the hoist side)
superimposed on a long yellow arrowhead; there is a narrow black border
between the red and yellow, and a narrow white border between the yellow
and the green


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: After growing on average at less than 1% a year in
1986-87, GDP dropped by 3% a year in 1988-89. The decline resulted from
bad weather, labor trouble in the canefields, and flooding and equipment
problems in the bauxite industry. Consumer prices rose about 35% in 1988
and by over 100% in 1989, and the current account deficit widened
substantially as sugar and bauxite exports fell. Moreover, electric



Online LibraryUnited States. Central Intelligence AgencyThe 1991 CIA World Factbook → online text (page 31 of 89)