Copyright
United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

The 1991 CIA World Factbook online

. (page 32 of 89)
Online LibraryUnited States. Central Intelligence AgencyThe 1991 CIA World Factbook → online text (page 32 of 89)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


power is in short supply and constitutes a major barrier to future gains
in national output. The government, in association with international
financial agencies, seeks to reduce its payment arrears and to raise new
funds. The government's stabilization program - aimed at establishing
realistic exchange rates, reasonable price stability, and a resumption of
growth - requires considerable public administrative abilities and
continued patience by consumers during a long incubation period.


_#_GDP: $287.2 million, per capita $380; real growth rate - 3.3%
(1989)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 105% (1989)


_#_Unemployment rate: 12-15% (1991 est.)


_#_Budget: revenues $65 million; expenditures $129 million, including
capital expenditures of $6 million (1989 est.)


_#_Exports: $234 million (f.o.b., 1991 est.);

commodities - bauxite, sugar, gold, rice, shrimp, molasses, timber,
rum;

partners - UK 31%, US 23%, CARICOM 7%, Canada 6% (1988)


_#_Imports: $319 million (c.i.f., 1991 est.);

commodities - manufactures machinery, food, petroleum;

partners - US 33%, CARICOM 10%, UK 9%, Canada 2% (1989)


_#_External debt: $1.7 billion, including arrears (December 1990 est.)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate - 10.0% (1989 est.); accounts
for more than 20% of GDP


_#_Electricity: 250,000 kW capacity; 635 million kWh produced,
830 kWh per capita (1990)


_#_Industries: bauxite mining, sugar, rice milling, timber, fishing
(shrimp), textiles, gold mining


_#_Agriculture: most important sector, accounting for 27% of GDP and
about 50% of exports; sugar and rice are key crops; development potential
exists for fishing and forestry; not self-sufficient in food, especially
wheat, vegetable oils, and animal products


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $116
million; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-88), $244 million; Communist countries 1970-89, $242 million


_#_Currency: Guyanese dollar (plural - dollars);
1 Guyanese dollar (G$) = 100 cents


_#_Exchange rates: Guyanese dollars (G$) per US$1 - 45.00 (since June
1990), 39.533 (1990), 27.159 (1989), 10.000 (1988), 9.756 (1987), 4.272
(1986), 4.252 (1985)


_#_Fiscal year: calendar year


_*_Communications
_#_Railroads: 187 km total, all single track 0.914-meter gauge


_#_Highways: 7,665 km total; 550 km paved, 5,000 km gravel, 1,525 km
earth, 590 km unimproved


_#_Inland waterways: 6,000 km total of navigable waterways; Berbice,
Demerara, and Essequibo Rivers are navigable by oceangoing vessels for
150 km, 100 km, and 80 km, respectively


_#_Ports: Georgetown


_#_Civil air: 5 major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 58 total, 55 usable; 5 with permanent-surface runways;
none with runways over 3,659 m; none with runways 2,440-3,659 m;
14 with runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: fair system with radio relay network; over
27,000 telephones; tropospheric scatter link to Trinidad; stations - 4 AM,
3 FM, no TV, 1 shortwave; 1 Atlantic Ocean INTELSAT earth station


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: Guyana Defense Force (GDF; includes Coast Guard
and Air Corps), Guyana Police Force (GPF), Guyana People's Militia (GPM),
Guyana National Service (GNS)


_#_Manpower availability: males 15-49, 195,142; 148,477 fit for
military service


_#_Defense expenditures: $5.5 million, 6% of GDP (1989 est.)
_%_
[email protected]_Haiti
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 27,750 km2; land area: 27,560 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly larger than Maryland


_#_Land boundary: 275 km with the Dominican Republic


_#_Coastline: 1,771 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Contiguous zone: 24 nm;

Continental shelf: to depth of exploitation;

Exclusive economic zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 12 nm


_#_Disputes: claims US-administered Navassa Island


_#_Climate: tropical; semiarid where mountains in east cut off trade
winds


_#_Terrain: mostly rough and mountainous


_#_Natural resources: bauxite


_#_Land use: arable land 20%; permanent crops 13%; meadows and
pastures 18%; forest and woodland 4%; other 45%; includes irrigated 3%


_#_Environment: lies in the middle of the hurricane belt and subject
to severe storms from June to October; occasional flooding and
earthquakes; deforestation; soil erosion


_#_Note: shares island of Hispaniola with Dominican Republic


_*_People
_#_Population: 6,286,511 (July 1991), growth rate 2.3% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 43 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 15 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: - 5 migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 106 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 52 years male, 55 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 6.3 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Haitian(s); adjective - Haitian


_#_Ethnic divisions: black 95%, mulatto and European 5%


_#_Religion: Roman Catholic is the official religion; Roman
Catholic 80% (of which an overwhelming majority also practice Voodoo),
Protestant 16% (Baptist 10%, Pentecostal 4%, Adventist 1%, other 1%),
none 1%, other 3% (1982)


_#_Language: French (official) spoken by only 10% of population; all
speak Creole


_#_Literacy: 53% (male 59%, female 47%) age 15 and over can
read and write (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 2,300,000; agriculture 66%, services 25%, industry 9%;
shortage of skilled labor, unskilled labor abundant (1982)


_#_Organized labor: NA


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Republic of Haiti


_#_Type: republic


_#_Capital: Port-au-Prince


_#_Administrative divisions: 9 departments, (departements,
singular - departement); Artibonite, Centre, Grand'Anse, Nord, Nord-Est,
Nord-Ouest, Ouest, Sud, Sud-Est


_#_Independence: 1 January 1804 (from France)


_#_Constitution: 27 August 1983, suspended February 1986; draft
constitution approved March 1987, suspended June 1988, most articles
reinstated March 1989; March 1987 Constitution fully observed by
government installed on 7 February 1991


_#_Legal system: based on Roman civil law system; accepts compulsory
ICJ jurisdiction


_#_National holiday: Independence Day, 1 January (1804)


_#_Executive branch: president, Council of Ministers (cabinet)


_#_Legislative branch: bicameral National Assembly (Assemblee
Nationale) consisting of an upper house or Senate and a lower house or
House of Deputies


_#_Judicial branch: Court of Appeal (Cour de Cassation)


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State - President Jean-Bertrand ARISTIDE (since 7 February
1991);

Head of Government - Prime Minister Rene PREVAL (since
13 February 1991)


_#_Political parties and leaders:
National Front for Change and Democracy (FNCD) led by Jean-Bertrand
ARISTIDE, including Congress of Democratic Movements (CONACOM), Victor
BENOIT; National Konbite Movement (MKN), Volvick Remy JOSEPH;
National Alliance for Democracy and Progress (ANDP), a coalition
consisting of Movement for the Installation of Democracy in Haiti (MIDH),
Marc BAZIN; National Progressive Revolutionary Party (PANPRA), Serge
GILLES; and National Patriotic Movement of November 28 (MNP-28), Dejean
BELIZAIRE;
National Agricultural and Industrial Party (PAIN), Louis DEJOIE;
Movement for National Reconstruction (MRN), Rene THEODORE;
Haitian Christian Democratic Party (PDCH), Sylvio CLAUDE;
Assembly of Progressive National Democrats (RDNP), Leslie MANIGAT;
National Party of Labor (PNT), Thomas DESULME;
Mobilization for National Development (MDN), Hubert DE RONCERAY;
Democratic Movement for the Liberation of Haiti (MODELH), Francois
LATORTUE;
Haitian Social Christian Party (PSCH), Gregoire EUGENE;
Movement for the Organization of the Country (MOP), Gesner COMEAU


_#_Suffrage: universal at age 18


_#_Elections:

President - last held 16 December 1990 (next election to be held
by December 1995);
results - Rev. Jean-Bertrand ARISTIDE 67.5%, Marc BAZIN 14.2%, Louis
DEJOIE 4.9%;

Senate - last held 16 December 1990, with runoff held 20 January
1991 (next to be held by December 1992);
results - percent of vote NA;
seats - (27) FNCD 13, ANDP 6, PAIN 2, MRN 2, PDCH 1, RDNP 1, PNT 1,
independent 1;

Chamber of Deputies - last held 16 December 1990, with runoff
held 20 January 1991 (next to be held by December 1994);
results - percent of vote NA;
seats - (83) FNCD 27, ANDP 17, PDCH 7, PAIN 6, RDNP 6, MDN 5, PNT 3,
MKN 2, MODELH 2, MRN 1, independent 5, other 2


_#_Communists: United Party of Haitian Communists (PUCH), Rene
THEODORE (roughly 2,000 members)


_#_Other political or pressure groups: Democratic Unity Confederation
(KID), Roman Catholic Church, Confederation of Haitian Workers (CTH),
Federation of Workers Trade Unions (FOS), Autonomous Haitian Workers
(CATH), National Popular Assembly (APN)


_#_Member of: ACCT, CARICOM (observer), CCC, ECLAC, FAO, G-77, GATT,
IADB, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INTELSAT,
INTERPOL, IOC, ITU, LAES, LORCS, OAS, OPANAL, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO,
UNIDO, UPU, WCL, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador (vacant), Charge
d'Affaires Raymond Alcide JOSEPH; Chancery at 2311 Massachusetts Avenue
NW, Washington DC 20008; telephone (202) 332-4090 through 4092; there
are Haitian Consulates General in Boston, Chicago, Miami, New York,
and San Juan (Puerto Rico);

US - Ambassador Alvin P. ADAMS, Jr.; Embassy at Harry Truman
Boulevard, Port-au-Prince (mailing address is P. O. Box 1761,
Port-au-Prince), telephone [509] (1) 20-354 or 20-368, 20-200, 20-612


_#_Flag: two equal horizontal bands of blue (top) and red with a
centered white rectangle bearing the coat of arms which contains a palm
tree flanked by flags and two cannons above a scroll bearing the motto
L'UNION FAIT LA FORCE (Union Makes Strength)


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: About 85% of the population live in abject poverty.
Agriculture is mainly small-scale subsistence farming and employs
two-thirds of the work force. The majority of the population does not
have ready access to safe drinking water, adequate medical care, or
sufficient food. Few social assistance programs exist, and the lack of
employment opportunities remains one of the most critical problems
facing the economy, along with soil erosion and political instability.


_#_GDP: $2.7 billion, per capita $440; real growth rate - 3.0% (1990
est.)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 20% (1990 est.)


_#_Unemployment rate: 25-50% (1990 est.)


_#_Budget: revenues $300 million; expenditures $416 million, including
capital expenditures of $145 million (1990 est.)


_#_Exports: $169 million (f.o.b., 1990 est.);

commodities - light manufactures 69%, coffee 19%, other agriculture
8%, other 8%;

partners - US 84%, Italy 4%, France 3%, other industrial 6%,
less developed countries 3% (1987)


_#_Imports: $348 million (c.i.f., 1990 est.);

commodities - machines and manufactures 34%, food and beverages 22%,
petroleum products 14%, chemicals 10%, fats and oils 9%;

partners - US 64%, Netherlands Antilles 5%, Japan 5%, France 4%,
Canada 3%, Germany 3% (1987)


_#_External debt: $838 million (December 1990)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate 0.3% (FY88); accounts for
15% of GDP


_#_Electricity: 230,000 kW capacity; 264 million kWh produced,
43 kWh per capita (1990)


_#_Industries: sugar refining, textiles, flour milling, cement
manufacturing, tourism, light assembly industries based on imported parts


_#_Agriculture: accounts for 33% of GDP and employs 66% of work force;
mostly small-scale subsistence farms; commercial crops - coffee, mangoes,
sugarcane and wood; staple crops - rice, corn, sorghum; shortage of
wheat flour


_#_Illicit drugs: transshipment point for cocaine


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $700
million; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-88), $682 million


_#_Currency: gourde (plural - gourdes); 1 gourde (G) = 100 centimes


_#_Exchange rates: gourdes (G) per US$1 - 5.0 (fixed rate)


_#_Fiscal year: 1 October-30 September


_*_Communications
_#_Railroads: 40 km 0.760-meter narrow gauge, single-track, privately
owned industrial line


_#_Highways: 4,000 km total; 950 km paved, 900 km otherwise improved,
2,150 km unimproved


_#_Inland waterways: negligible; less than 100 km navigable


_#_Ports: Port-au-Prince, Cap-Haitien


_#_Civil air: 4 major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 15 total, 10 usable; 3 with permanent-surface runways;
none with runways over 3,659 m; 1 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 4 with
runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: domestic facilities barely adequate,
international facilities slightly better; 36,000 telephones;
stations - 33 AM, no FM, 4 TV, 2 shortwave; 1 Atlantic Ocean earth station


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: Army (including Police), Navy, Air Corps


_#_Manpower availability: males 15-49, 1,287,179; 691,926 fit for
military service; 61,265 reach military age (18) annually


_#_Defense expenditures: $34 million, 1.5% of GDP (1988 est.)
_%_
[email protected]_Heard Island and McDonald Islands
(territory of Australia)
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 412 km2; land area: 412 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly less than 2.5 times the size of
Washington, DC


_#_Land boundaries: none


_#_Coastline: 101.9 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 3 nm


_#_Climate: antarctic


_#_Terrain: Heard Island - bleak and mountainous, with an extinct
volcano; McDonald Islands - small and rocky


_#_Land use: arable land 0%; permanent crops 0%; meadows and pastures
0%; forest and woodland 0%; other 100%


_#_Environment: primarily used as research stations


_#_Note: located 4,100 km southwest of Australia in the
southern Indian Ocean


_*_People
_#_Population: uninhabited


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Territory of Heard Island and McDonald Islands


_#_Type: territory of Australia administered by the Antarctic Division
of the Department of Science in Canberra (Australia)


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: no economic activity


_*_Communications
_#_Ports: none; offshore anchorage only


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Note: defense is the responsibility of Australia
_%_
[email protected]_Honduras
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 112,090 km2; land area: 111,890 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly larger than Tennessee


_#_Land boundaries: 1,520 km total; Guatemala 256 km, El Salvador 342
km, Nicaragua 922 km


_#_Coastline: 820 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Contiguous zone: 24 nm;

Continental shelf: 200 m (depth) or to depth of exploitation;

Exclusive economic zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 12 nm


_#_Disputes: dispute with El Salvador over several sections of
the land boundary; dispute over Golfo de Fonseca maritime boundary
because of disputed sovereignty of islands; unresolved maritime boundary
with Nicaragua


_#_Climate: subtropical in lowlands, temperate in mountains


_#_Terrain: mostly mountains in interior, narrow coastal plains


_#_Natural resources: timber, gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc,
iron ore, antimony, coal, fish


_#_Land use: arable land 14%; permanent crops 2%; meadows and pastures
30%; forest and woodland 34%; other 20%; includes irrigated 1%


_#_Environment: subject to frequent, but generally mild, earthquakes;
damaging hurricanes and floods along Caribbean coast; deforestation; soil
erosion


_*_People
_#_Population: 4,949,275 (July 1991), growth rate 2.9% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 38 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 7 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: - 2 migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 56 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 64 years male, 68 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 5.0 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Honduran(s); adjective - Honduran


_#_Ethnic divisions: mestizo (mixed Indian and European) 90%, Indian
7%, black 2%, white 1%


_#_Religion: Roman Catholic about 97%; small Protestant minority


_#_Language: Spanish, Indian dialects


_#_Literacy: 73% (male 76%, female 71%) age 15 and over can
read and write (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 1,300,000; agriculture 62%, services 20%,
manufacturing 9%, construction 3%, other 6% (1985)


_#_Organized labor: 40% of urban labor force, 20% of rural work force
(1985)


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Republic of Honduras


_#_Type: republic


_#_Capital: Tegucigalpa


_#_Administrative divisions: 18 departments (departamentos,
singular - departamento); Atlantida, Choluteca, Colon, Comayagua,
Copan, Cortes, El Paraiso, Francisco Morazan, Gracias a Dios,
Intibuca, Islas de la Bahia, La Paz, Lempira, Ocotepeque, Olancho,
Santa Barbara, Valle, Yoro


_#_Independence: 15 September 1821 (from Spain)


_#_Constitution: 11 January 1982, effective 20 January 1982


_#_Legal system: rooted in Roman and Spanish civil law; some influence
of English common law; accepts ICJ jurisdiction, with reservations


_#_National holiday: Independence Day, 15 September (1821)


_#_Executive branch: president, Council of Ministers (cabinet)


_#_Legislative branch: unicameral National Congress (Congreso
Nacional)


_#_Judicial branch: Supreme Court of Justice (Corte Suprema de
Justica)


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State and Head of Government - Rafael Leonardo CALLEJAS
Romero (since 26 January 1990)


_#_Political parties and leaders:
Liberal Party (PLH) - faction leaders, Carlos FLORES Facusse (leader of
Florista Liberal Movement), Carlos MONTOYA (Azconista subfaction), Ramon
VILLEDA Bermudez and Jorge Arturo REINA (M-Lider faction);
National Party (PNH), Jose Celin DISCUA, party president;
PNH faction leaders - Oswaldo RAMOS Soto and Rafael Leonardo CALLEJAS
(Monarca faction);
National Innovation and Unity Party-Social Democrats (PINU-SD), Enrique
AGUILAR Cerrato Paz;
Christian Democratic Party (PDCH), Jorge ILLESCAS;
Democratic Action (AD), Walter LOPEZ Reyes


_#_Suffrage: universal and compulsory at age 18


_#_Elections:

President - last held on 26 November 1989 (next to be held
November 1993);
results - Rafael Leonardo CALLEJAS (PNH) 51%,
Carlos FLORES Facusse (PLH) 43.3%, other 5.7%;

National Congress - last held on 26 November 1989 (next to be held
November 1993);
results - PNH 51%, PLH 43%, PDCH 1.9%, PINU 1.5%, other 2.6%;
seats - (128 total) PNH 71, PLH 55, PINU 2


_#_Communists: up to 1,500; Honduran leftist groups - Communist Party
of Honduras (PCH), Party for the Transformation of Honduras (PTH),
Morazanist Front for the Liberation of Honduras (FMLH), People's
Revolutionary Union/Popular Liberation Movement (URP/MPL), Popular
Revolutionary Forces-Lorenzo Zelaya (FPR/LZ), Socialist Party of Honduras
Central American Workers Revolutionary Party (PASO/PRTC)


_#_Other political or pressure groups: National Association of
Honduran Campesinos (ANACH), Honduran Council of Private Enterprise
(COHEP), Confederation of Honduran Workers (CTH), National Union of
Campesinos (UNC), General Workers Confederation (CGT), United Federation
of Honduran Workers (FUTH), Committee for the Defense of Human Rights in
Honduras (CODEH), Coordinating Committee of Popular Organizations (CCOP)


_#_Member of: BCIE, CACM, ECLAC, FAO, G-77, IADB, IBRD, ICAO, ICFTU,
IDA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF, IMO, INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, IOM, ITU, LAES,
LAIA (observer), LORCS, OAS, OPANAL, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO,
UPU, WCL, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador Jorge Ramon HERNANDEZ
Alcerro; Chancery at Suite 100, 4301 Connecticut Avenue NW, Washington
DC 20008; telephone (202) 966-7700 through 7702; there are Honduran
Consulates General in Chicago, Los Angeles, Miami, New Orleans, New York,
and San Francisco, and Consulates in Baton Rouge, Boston, Detroit,
Houston, and Jacksonville;

US - Ambassador S. Crescencio ARCOS; Embassy at Avenida La Paz,
Tegucigalpa (mailing address is APO Miami 34022); telephone [504] 32-3120


_#_Flag: three equal horizontal bands of blue (top), white, and blue
with five blue five-pointed stars arranged in an X pattern centered
in the white band; the stars represent the members of the former Federal
Republic of Central America - Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala,
Honduras, and Nicaragua; similar to the flag of El Salvador which
features a round emblem encircled by the words REPUBLICA DE EL
SALVADOR EN LA AMERICA CENTRAL centered in the white band; also
similar to the flag of Nicaragua which features a triangle
encircled by the words REPUBLICA DE NICARAGUA on top and AMERICA
CENTRAL on the bottom, centered in the white band


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: Honduras is one of the poorest countries in the Western
Hemisphere. Agriculture, the most important sector of the economy,
accounts for nearly 30% of GDP, employs 62% of the labor force, and
produces two-thirds of exports. Productivity remains low. Industry,
still in its early stages, employs nearly 9% of the labor force,
accounts for 15% of GDP, and generates 20% of exports. The service
sectors, including public administration, account for 50% of GDP and
employ nearly 20% of the labor force. Basic problems facing the
economy include rapid population growth, high unemployment, sharply
increased inflation, a lack of basic services, a large and inefficient
public sector, and the dependence of the export sector mostly on coffee
and bananas, which are subject to sharp price fluctuations. Despite
government efforts at reform and large-scale foreign assistance, the
economy still is unable to take advantage of its sizable natural
resources.


_#_GDP: $4.9 billion, per capita $960; real growth rate -1.0% (1990)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 35.2% (1990 est.)


_#_Unemployment rate: 15% unemployed, 30-40% underemployed (1989)


_#_Budget: revenues $1.4 billion; expenditures $1.9 billion,
including capital expenditures of $511 million (1990 est.)


_#_Exports: $939 million (f.o.b., 1990);

commodities - bananas, coffee, shrimp, lobster, minerals, lumber;

partners - US 52%, FRG 11%, Japan, Italy, Belgium


_#_Imports: $1.1 billion (c.i.f. 1990);

commodities - machinery and transport equipment, chemical products,
manufactured goods, fuel and oil, foodstuffs;

partners - US 39%, Japan 9%, CACM, Venezuela, Mexico


_#_External debt: $2.8 billion (1990)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate 2.9% (1989); accounts for
15% of GDP


_#_Electricity: 668,000 kW capacity; 2,023 million kWh produced,
380 kWh per capita (1990)


_#_Industries: agricultural processing (sugar and coffee), textiles,
clothing, wood products


_#_Agriculture: most important sector, accounting for nearly 30% of
GDP, over 60% of the labor force, and two-thirds of exports; principal
products include bananas, coffee, timber, beef, citrus fruit, shrimp;
importer of wheat


_#_Illicit drugs: illicit producer of cannabis, cultivated on
small plots and used principally for local consumption; transshipment
point for cocaine


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $1.4
billion; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-88), $1,027 million


_#_Currency: lempira (plural - lempiras); 1 lempira (L) = 100 centavos


_#_Exchange rates: lempiras (L) per US$1 - 5.30 (fixed rate); 5.70
parallel black-market rate (November 1990)


_#_Fiscal year: calendar year


_*_Communications
_#_Railroads: 785 km total; 508 km 1.067-meter gauge, 277 km
0.914-meter gauge


_#_Highways: 8,950 km total; 1,700 km paved, 5,000 km otherwise
improved, 2,250 km unimproved earth


_#_Inland waterways: 465 km navigable by small craft


_#_Ports: Puerto Castilla, Puerto Cortes, San Lorenzo


_#_Merchant marine: 173 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 527,481
GRT/812,095 DWT; includes 2 passenger-cargo, 107 cargo, 12 refrigerated
cargo, 9 container, 1 roll-on/roll-off cargo, 20 petroleum, oils, and
lubricants (POL) tanker, 1 chemical tanker, 2 specialized tanker, 1
vehicle carrier, 18 bulk; note - a flag of convenience registry; the
USSR owns one ship under the Honduran flag


_#_Civil air: 9 major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 175 total, 134 usable; 8 with permanent-surface runways;
none with runways over 3,659 m; 4 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 13 with
runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: improved, but still inadequate; connection into
Central American Microwave System; 35,100 telephones; stations - 176 AM,



Online LibraryUnited States. Central Intelligence AgencyThe 1991 CIA World Factbook → online text (page 32 of 89)