Copyright
United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

The 1991 CIA World Factbook online

. (page 54 of 89)
Online LibraryUnited States. Central Intelligence AgencyThe 1991 CIA World Factbook → online text (page 54 of 89)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


km


_#_Coastline: none - landlocked


_#_Maritime claims: none - landlocked


_#_Disputes: Libya claims about 19,400 km2 in northern Niger;
demarcation of international boundaries in Lake Chad, the lack of which
has led to border incidents in the past, is completed and awaiting
ratification by Cameroon, Chad, Niger, and Nigeria; Burkina and Mali are
proceeding with boundary demarcation, including the tripoint with Niger


_#_Climate: desert; mostly hot, dry, dusty; tropical in extreme south


_#_Terrain: predominately desert plains and sand dunes; flat to
rolling plains in south; hills in north


_#_Natural resources: uranium, coal, iron ore, tin, phosphates


_#_Land use: arable land 3%; permanent crops 0%; meadows and pastures
7%; forest and woodland 2%; other 88%; includes irrigated NEGL%


_#_Environment: recurrent drought and desertification severely
affecting marginal agricultural activities; overgrazing; soil erosion


_#_Note: landlocked


_*_People
_#_Population: 8,154,145 (July 1991), growth rate 3.4% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 50 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 16 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: 0 migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 129 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 49 years male, 53 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 7.0 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Nigerien(s) adjective - Nigerien


_#_Ethnic divisions: Hausa 56%; Djerma 22%; Fula 8.5%; Tuareg 8%; Beri
Beri (Kanouri) 4.3%; Arab, Toubou, and Gourmantche 1.2%; about 4,000
French expatriates


_#_Religion: Muslim 80%, remainder indigenous beliefs and Christians


_#_Language: French (official); Hausa, Djerma


_#_Literacy: 28% (male 40%, female 17%) age 15 and over can
read and write (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 2,500,000 wage earners (1982); agriculture 90%,
industry and commerce 6%, government 4%; 51% of population of working age
(1985)


_#_Organized labor: negligible


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Republic of Niger


_#_Type: republic; presidential system in which military officers
hold key offices


_#_Capital: Niamey


_#_Administrative divisions: 7 departments (departements,
singular - departement); Agadez, Diffa, Dosso, Maradi, Niamey, Tahoua,
Zinder


_#_Independence: 3 August 1960 (from France)


_#_Constitution: adopted NA December 1989 after 15 years of
military rule


_#_Legal system: based on French civil law system and customary law;
has not accepted compulsory ICJ jurisdiction


_#_National holidays: Republic Day, 18 December (1958)


_#_Executive branch: president, prime minister, Council of Ministers
(cabinet)


_#_Legislative branch: National Assembly (Assemblee Nationale)


_#_Judicial branch: State Court (Cour d'Etat), Court of Appeal
(Cour d'Apel)


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State - President Brig. Gen. Ali SAIBOU (since 14
November 1987);

Head of Government - Prime Minister Aliou MAHAMIDOU (since 2 March
1990)


_#_Political parties and leaders: National Movement for the
Development Society (MNSD), leader NA; other political parties now
forming


_#_Suffrage: universal adult at age 18


_#_Elections:

President - last held December 1989 (next to be held NA 1996);
results - President Ali SAIBOU was reelected without opposition;

National Assembly - last held 10 December 1989 (next to be
held NA); results - MNSD was the only party;
seats - (150 total) MNSD 150 (indirectly elected);
note - Niger is to hold a national conference to decide upon a
transitional government and an agenda for multiparty elections


_#_Communists: no Communist party; some sympathizers in outlawed
Sawaba party


_#_Member of: ACCT, ACP, AfDB, CCC, CEAO, ECA, ECOWAS, Entente, FAO,
FZ, G-77, GATT, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMF,
INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, ITU, LORCS, NAM, OAU, OIC, UN,
UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WADB, WCL, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WTO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador Moumouni Adamou DJERMAKOYE;
Chancery at 2204 R Street NW, Washington DC 20008; telephone (202)
483-4224 through 4227;

US - Ambassador Carl C. CUNDIFF; Embassy at Avenue des
Ambassades, Niamey (mailing address is B. P. 11201, Niamey); telephone
[227] 72-26-61 through 64


_#_Flag: three equal horizontal bands of orange (top), white, and
green with a small orange disk (representing the sun) centered in the
white band; similar to the flag of India which has a blue, spoked wheel
centered in the white band


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: About 90% of the population is engaged in farming and
stock rearing, activities which generate almost half the national
income. The economy also depends heavily on exploitation of large uranium
deposits. Uranium production grew rapidly in the mid-1970s, but tapered
off in the early 1980s, when world prices declined. France is a major
customer, while Germany, Japan, and Spain also make regular purchases.
The depressed demand for uranium has contributed to an overall
sluggishness in the economy, a severe trade imbalance, and a mounting
external debt.


_#_GDP: $2.0 billion, per capita $270; real growth rate - 3.3% (1989
est.)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): - 2.8% (1989)


_#_Unemployment rate: NA%


_#_Budget: revenues $220 million; expenditures $446 million, including
capital expenditures of $190 million (FY89 est.)


_#_Exports: $308 million (f.o.b., 1989 est.);

commodities - uranium 75%, livestock products, cowpeas, onions;

partners - France 65%, Nigeria 11%, Ivory Coast, Italy


_#_Imports: $386 million (c.i.f., 1989 est.);

commodities - petroleum products, primary materials, machinery,
vehicles and parts, electronic equipment, pharmaceuticals, chemical
products, cereals, foodstuffs;


partners - France 32%, Ivory Coast 11%, Germany 5%, Italy 4%,
Nigeria 4%


_#_External debt: $1.8 billion (December 1990 est.)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate 3.0% (1989 est.); accounts
for 18% of GDP


_#_Electricity: 102,000 kW capacity; 225 million kWh produced,
30 kWh per capita (1989)


_#_Industries: cement, brick, textiles, food processing, chemicals,
slaughterhouses, and a few other small light industries; uranium
production began in 1971


_#_Agriculture: accounts for roughly 40% of GDP and 90% of labor
force; cash crops - cowpeas, cotton, peanuts; food crops - millet, sorghum,
cassava, rice; livestock - cattle, sheep, goats; self-sufficient in food
except in drought years


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $380
million; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-88), $3.0 billion; OPEC bilateral aid (1979-89), $504 million;
Communist countries (1970-89), $61 million


_#_Currency: Communaute Financiere Africaine franc
(plural - francs); 1 CFA franc (CFAF) = 100 centimes


_#_Exchange rates: Communaute Financiere Africaine francs (CFAF)
per US$1 - 256.54 (January 1991), 272.26 (1990), 319.01 (1989), 297.85
(1988), 300.54 (1987), 346.30 (1986), 449.26 (1985)


_#_Fiscal year: 1 October-30 September


_*_Communications
_#_Highways: 39,970 km total; 3,170 km bituminous, 10,330 km gravel
and laterite, 3,470 km earthen, 23,000 km tracks


_#_Inland waterways: Niger river is navigable 300 km from Niamey to
Gaya on the Benin frontier from mid-December through March


_#_Civil air: no major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 31 total, 29 usable; 7 with permanent-surface runways;
none with runways over 3,659 m; 1 with runways 2,440-3,659 m; 12 with
runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: small system of wire, radiocommunications, and
radio relay links concentrated in southwestern area; 11,900 telephones;
stations - 15 AM, 5 FM, 16 TV; satellite earth stations - 1 Atlantic Ocean
INTELSAT, 1 Indian Ocean INTELSAT, and 4 domestic


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: Army, Air Force, paramilitary Gendarmerie, paramilitary
Republican Guard, paramilitary Presidential Guard, paramilitary National
Police


_#_Manpower availability: males 15-49, 1,713,566; 923,634 fit for
military service; 90,801 reach military age (18) annually


_#_Defense expenditures: $20.6 million, 0.9% of GDP (1988)
_%_
[email protected]_Nigeria
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 923,770 km2; land area: 910,770 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly more than twice the size of California


_#_Land boundaries: 4,047 km total; Benin 773 km, Cameroon 1,690 km,
Chad 87 km, Niger 1,497 km


_#_Coastline: 853 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Continental shelf: 200 m (depth) or to depth of exploitation;

Exclusive economic zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 30 nm


_#_Disputes: demarcation of international boundaries in Lake
Chad, the lack of which has led to border incidents in the past, is
completed and awaiting ratification by Cameroon, Chad, Niger, and
Nigeria; Nigerian proposals to reopen maritime boundary negotiations and
redemarcate the entire land boundary have been rejected by Cameroon


_#_Climate: varies - equatorial in south, tropical in center, arid in
north


_#_Terrain: southern lowlands merge into central hills and plateaus;
mountains in southeast, plains in north


_#_Natural resources: crude oil, tin, columbite, iron ore, coal,
limestone, lead, zinc, natural gas


_#_Land use: arable land 31%; permanent crops 3%; meadows and pastures
23%; forest and woodland 15%; other 28%; includes irrigated NEGL%


_#_Environment: recent droughts in north severely affecting marginal
agricultural activities; desertification; soil degradation, rapid
deforestation


_*_People
_#_Population: 122,470,574 (July 1991), growth rate 3.0% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: 46 births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: 16 deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: NEGL migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: 118 deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: 48 years male, 50 years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: 6.5 children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Nigerian(s); adjective - Nigerian


_#_Ethnic divisions: more than 250 tribal groups; Hausa and Fulani
of the north, Yoruba of the southwest, and Ibos of the southeast make
up 65% of the population; about 27,000 non-Africans


_#_Religion: Muslim 50%, Christian 40%, indigenous beliefs 10%


_#_Language: English (official); Hausa, Yoruba, Ibo, Fulani, and
several other languages also widely used


_#_Literacy: 51% (male 62%, female 40%) age 15 and over can
read and write (1990 est.)


_#_Labor force: 42,844,000; agriculture 54%, industry, commerce, and
services 19%, government 15%; 49% of population of working age (1985)


_#_Organized labor: 3,520,000 wage earners belong to 42 recognized
trade unions, which come under a single national labor federation - the
Nigerian Labor Congress (NLC)


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: Federal Republic of Nigeria


_#_Type: military government since 31 December 1983


_#_Capital: Lagos; note - some government departments have relocated
to the designated new capital in Abuja


_#_Administrative divisions: 21 states and 1 territory*;
Abuja Capital Territory*, Akwa Ibom, Anambra, Bauchi, Bendel, Benue,
Borno, Cross River, Gongola, Imo, Kaduna, Kano, Katsina, Kwara, Lagos,
Niger, Ogun, Ondo, Oyo, Plateau, Rivers, Sokoto


_#_Independence: 1 October 1960 (from UK)


_#_Constitution: 1 October 1979, amended 9 February 1984, revised 1989


_#_Legal system: based on English common law, Islamic, and tribal law


_#_National holiday: Independence Day, 1 October (1960)


_#_Executive branch: president of the Armed Forces Ruling Council,
Armed Forces Ruling Council, National Council of State, Council of
Ministers (cabinet)


_#_Legislative branch: National Assembly was dissolved after the
military coup of 31 December 1983


_#_Judicial branch: Supreme Court, Federal Court of Appeal


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State and Head of Government - President and Commander in
Chief of Armed Forces Gen. Ibrahim BABANGIDA (since 27 August 1985)


_#_Political parties and leaders: two political parties established by
the government in 1989 - Social Democratic Party (SDP) and National
Republican Convention (NRC)


_#_Suffrage: universal at age 21


_#_Elections:

President - scheduled for 1 October 1992;

National Assembly - scheduled for early 1992


_#_Communists: the pro-Communist underground consists of a small
fraction of the Nigerian left; leftist leaders are prominent in the
country's central labor organization but have little influence on the
government


_#_Member of: ACP, AfDB, C, CCC, ECA, ECOWAS, FAO, G-19, G-24, G-77,
GATT, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICC, IDA, IFAD, IFC, ILO, IMO, IMF, INMARSAT,
INTELSAT, INTERPOL, IOC, ISO, ITU, LORCS, NAM, OAU, OIC, OPEC,
PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNHCR, UNIDO, UNIIMOG, UPU, WCL, WHO, WMO, WTO


_#_Diplomatic representation: Ambassador Hamzat AHMADU; Chancery at
2201 M Street NW, Washington DC 20037; telephone (202) 822-1500;
there are Nigerian Consulates General in Atlanta, New York and San
Francisco;

US - Ambassador Lannon WALKER; Embassy at 2 Eleke Crescent,
Victoria Island, Lagos (mailing address is P. O. Box 554, Lagos);
telephone [234] (1) 610097; there is a US Consulate General in Kaduna


_#_Flag: three equal vertical bands of green (hoist side), white, and
green


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: Although Nigeria is Africa's leading oil-producing
country, it remains poor with a $280 per capita GDP. In 1990, despite
rising oil prices and a sharp drop in inflation, performance remained
slack with continuing underutilization of industrial capacity and a
second year of relatively weak agricultural performance. Agricultural
production was up only 4.2% in 1990, still below the 1987 level.
Industrial output showed a 7.2% increase, but remained below the 1985
level. Government efforts to reduce Nigeria's dependence on oil exports
and to sustain noninflationary growth have fallen short due to inadequate
new investment funds. Living standards continue to deteriorate from the
higher level of the early 1980s oil boom.


_#_GDP: $27.2 billion, per capita $230; real growth rate 2.7%
(1990 est.)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 16% (1990)


_#_Unemployment rate: NA%


_#_Budget: revenues $8.0 billion; expenditures $8.0 billion, including
capital expenditures of $NA (1990 est.)


_#_Exports: $13.0 billion (f.o.b., 1990 est.);

commodities - oil 95%, cocoa, rubber;

partners - EC 51%, US 32%


_#_Imports: $9.5 billion (c.i.f., 1990 est.);

commodities - consumer goods, capital equipment, chemicals, raw
materials;

partners - EC, US


_#_External debt: $35 billion (December 1990 est.)


_#_Industrial production: growth rate 7.2% (1990 est.); accounts
for 23% of GDP, including petroleum


_#_Electricity: 4,737,000 kW capacity; 11,270 million kWh produced,
100 kWh per capita (1989)


_#_Industries: crude oil and mining - coal, tin, columbite;
primary processing industries - palm oil, peanut, cotton, rubber,
wood, hides and skins; manufacturing industries - textiles,
cement, building materials, food products, footwear, chemical, printing,
ceramics, steel


_#_Agriculture: accounts for 28% of GNP and half of labor force;
inefficient small-scale farming dominates; once a large net exporter of
food and now an importer; cash crops - cocoa, peanuts, palm oil, rubber;
food crops - corn, rice, sorghum, millet, cassava, yams;
livestock - cattle, sheep, goats, pigs; fishing and forestry resources
extensively exploited


_#_Illicit drugs: illicit heroin and some cocaine trafficking;
marijuana cultivation for domestic consumption and export; major transit
country for heroin en route from Southwest Asia via Africa to Western
Europe and the US; growing transit route for cocaine from South America
via West Africa to Western Europe and the US


_#_Economic aid: US commitments, including Ex-Im (FY70-89), $705
million; Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral commitments
(1970-87), $2.5 billion; Communist countries (1970-89), $2.2 billion


_#_Currency: naira (plural - naira); 1 naira (4) = 100 kobo


_#_Exchange rates: naira (4) per US$1 - 8.707 (December 1990),
8.038 (1990), 7.3647 (1989), 4.5370 (1988), 4.0160 (1987), 1.7545 (1986),
0.8938 (1985)


_#_Fiscal year: calendar year


_*_Communications
_#_Railroads: 3,505 km 1.067-meter gauge


_#_Highways: 107,990 km total 30,019 km paved (mostly
bituminous-surface treatment); 25,411 km laterite, gravel, crushed stone,
improved earth; 52,560 km unimproved


_#_Inland waterways: 8,575 km consisting of Niger and Benue Rivers and
smaller rivers and creeks


_#_Pipelines: 2,042 km crude oil; 500 km natural gas; 3,000 km refined
products


_#_Ports: Lagos, Port Harcourt, Calabar, Warri, Onne, Sapele


_#_Merchant marine: 28 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 420,658
GRT/668,951 DWT; includes 18 cargo, 1 refrigerated cargo, 1
roll-on/roll-off cargo, 6 petroleum, oils, and lubricants (POL) tanker, 1
chemical tanker, 1 bulk


_#_Civil air: 76 major transport aircraft


_#_Airports: 81 total, 68 usable; 32 with permanent-surface runways;
1 with runways over 3,659 m; 14 with runways 2,440-3,659 m;
21 with runways 1,220-2,439 m


_#_Telecommunications: above-average system limited by poor
maintenance; major expansion in progress; radio relay and cable routes;
155,000 telephones; stations - 37 AM, 19 FM, 38 TV; 2 Atlantic Ocean
INTELSAT, 1 Indian Ocean INTELSAT, domestic, with 19 stations; 1 coaxial
submarine cable


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: Army, Navy, Air Force, paramilitary Police Force


_#_Manpower availability: males 15-49, 28,070,431; 16,040,870 fit for
military service; 1,302,970 reach military age (18) annually


_#_Defense expenditures: $300 million, 1% of GNP (1990 est.)
_%_
[email protected]_Niue
(free association with New Zealand)
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 260 km2; land area: 260 km2


_#_Comparative area: slightly less than 1.5 times the size of
Washington, DC


_#_Land boundaries: none


_#_Coastline: 64 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Exclusive economic zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 12 nm


_#_Climate: tropical; modified by southeast trade winds


_#_Terrain: steep limestone cliffs along coast, central plateau


_#_Natural resources: fish, arable land


_#_Land use: arable land 61%; permanent crops 4%; meadows and pastures
4%; forest and woodland 19%; other 12%


_#_Environment: subject to typhoons


_#_Note: one of world's largest coral islands; located about 460 km
east of Tonga


_*_People
_#_Population: 1,908 (July 1991), growth rate - 0.1% (1991)


_#_Birth rate: NA births/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Death rate: NA deaths/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Net migration rate: NA migrants/1,000 population (1991)


_#_Infant mortality rate: NA deaths/1,000 live births (1991)


_#_Life expectancy at birth: NA years male, NA years female (1991)


_#_Total fertility rate: NA children born/woman (1991)


_#_Nationality: noun - Niuean(s); adjective - Niuean


_#_Ethnic divisions: Polynesian, with some 200 Europeans, Samoans, and
Tongans


_#_Religion: Ekalesia Nieue (Niuean Church) - a Protestant church
closely related to the London Missionary Society 75%, Mormon 10%,
Roman Catholic, Jehovah's Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventist 5%


_#_Language: Polynesian tongue closely related to Tongan and Samoan;
English


_#_Literacy: NA% (male NA%, female NA%) but compulsory education
age 5 to 14


_#_Labor force: 1,000 (1981 est.); most work on family plantations;
paid work exists only in government service, small industry, and the Niue
Development Board


_#_Organized labor: NA


_*_Government
_#_Long-form name: none


_#_Type: self-governing territory in free association with New
Zealand; Niue fully responsible for internal affairs; New Zealand
retains responsibility for external affairs


_#_Capital: Alofi


_#_Administrative divisions: none


_#_Independence: became a self-governing territory in free
association with New Zealand on 19 October 1974


_#_Constitution: 19 October 1974 (Niue Constitution Act)


_#_Legal system: English common law


_#_National holiday: Waitangi Day (Treaty of Waitangi established
British sovereignty), 6 February (1840)


_#_Executive branch: British monarch, premier, Cabinet


_#_Legislative branch: Legislative Assembly


_#_Judicial branch: Appeal Court of New Zealand, High Court


_#_Leaders:

Chief of State - Queen ELIZABETH II (since 6 February 1952),
represented by New Zealand Representative John SPRINGFORD (since 1974);

Head of Government - Premier Sir Robert R. REX (since NA October
1974)


_#_Suffrage: universal adult at age 18


_#_Political parties and leaders:
Niue Island Party (NIP), Young VIVIAN


_#_Elections:

Legislative Assembly - last held on 8 April 1990 (next to be
held March 1993);
results - percent of vote NA;
seats - (20 total, 6 elected) independents 5, NIP 1


_#_Member of: ESCAP (associate), SPC, SPF


_#_Diplomatic representation: none (self-governing territory in free
association with New Zealand)


_#_Flag: yellow with the flag of the UK in the upper hoist-side
quadrant; the flag of the UK bears five yellow five-pointed stars - a
large one on a blue disk in the center and a smaller one on each arm of
the bold red cross


_*_Economy
_#_Overview: The economy is heavily dependent on aid from New
Zealand. Government expenditures regularly exceed revenues, with the
shortfall made up by grants from New Zealand - the grants are used to pay
wages to public employees. The agricultural sector consists mainly of
subsistence gardening, although some cash crops are grown for export.
Industry consists primarily of small factories to process passion fruit,
lime oil, honey, and coconut cream. The sale of postage stamps to foreign
collectors is an important source of revenue. The island in recent years
has suffered a serious loss of population because of migration of Niueans
to New Zealand.


_#_GNP: $2.1 million, per capita $1,000; real growth rate NA%
(1989 est.)


_#_Inflation rate (consumer prices): 9.6% (1984)


_#_Unemployment rate: NA%


_#_Budget: revenues $5.5 million; expenditures $6.3 million, including
capital expenditures of $NA (FY85 est.)


_#_Exports: $175,274 (f.o.b., 1985);

commodities - canned coconut cream, copra, honey, passion fruit
products, pawpaw, root crops, limes, footballs, stamps, handicrafts;

partners - NZ 89%, Fiji, Cook Islands, Australia


_#_Imports: $3.8 million (c.i.f., 1985);

commodities - food, live animals, manufactured goods, machinery,
fuels, lubricants, chemicals, drugs;

partners - NZ 59%, Fiji 20%, Japan 13%, Western Samoa, Australia, US


_#_External debt: $NA


_#_Industrial production: growth rate NA%


_#_Electricity: 1,500 kW capacity; 3 million kWh produced,
1,490 kWh per capita (1990)


_#_Industries: tourist, handicrafts


_#_Agriculture: copra, coconuts, passion fruit, honey, limes;
subsistence crops - taro, yams, cassava (tapioca), sweet potatoes; pigs,
poultry, beef cattle


_#_Economic aid: Western (non-US) countries, ODA and OOF bilateral
commitments (1970-88), $62 million


_#_Currency: New Zealand dollar (plural - dollars);
1 New Zealand dollar (NZ$) = 100 cents


_#_Exchange rates: New Zealand dollars (NZ$) per US$1 - 1.6798 (January
1991), 1.6750 (1990), 1.6711 (1989), 1.5244 (1988), 1.6886 (1987), 1.9088
(1986), 2.0064 (1985)


_#_Fiscal year: 1 April-31 March


_*_Communications
_#_Highways: 123 km all-weather roads, 106 km access and plantation
roads


_#_Ports: none; offshore anchorage only


_#_Airports: 1 with permanent-surface runway of 1,650 m


_#_Telecommunications: single-line telephone system connects all
villages on island; 383 telephones; 1,000 radio receivers (1987 est.);
stations - 1 AM, 1 FM, no TV


_*_Defense Forces
_#_Branches: Police Force


_#_Note: defense is the responsibility of New Zealand
_%_
[email protected]_Norfolk Island
(territory of Australia)
_*_Geography
_#_Total area: 34.6 km2; land area: 34.6 km2


_#_Comparative area: about 0.2 times the size of Washington, DC


_#_Land boundaries: none


_#_Coastline: 32 km


_#_Maritime claims:

Exclusive fishing zone: 200 nm;

Territorial sea: 3 nm


_#_Climate: subtropical, mild, little seasonal temperature variation


_#_Terrain: volcanic formation with mostly rolling plains


_#_Natural resources: fish


_#_Land use: arable land 0%; permanent crops 0%; meadows and pastures



Online LibraryUnited States. Central Intelligence AgencyThe 1991 CIA World Factbook → online text (page 54 of 89)