United States. Congress. House. Committee on Inter.

American Overseas Interests Act : markup before the Subcommittee on International Operations and Human Rights of the Committee on International Relations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session, on H.R. 1561, May 8 and 9, 1995 online

. (page 1 of 19)
Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. House. Committee on InterAmerican Overseas Interests Act : markup before the Subcommittee on International Operations and Human Rights of the Committee on International Relations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session, on H.R. 1561, May 8 and 9, 1995 → online text (page 1 of 19)
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AMERICAN OVERSEAS INTERESTS ACT



Y4.IN8/16:AI13/2/l1ARKUP

Anerican Overseas Interests Act, ^° ■'irTTP



BEFORE THE

SUBCOMMITTEE ON
INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION
ON

H.R 1561



MAY 8 AND 9, 1995



Printed for the use of the Committee on International Relations




U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFF
93-948 CC WASHINGTON : 1995






For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office
Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office. Washington, DC 20402
ISBN 0-16-047708-5



AMERICAN OVERSEAS INTERESTS ACT



Y 4.IN8/16:AM 3/2/I1ARKUP

Anerican Overseas Interests Act* ^^•'TTTTp

BEFORE THE

SUBCOMMITTEE ON
INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

ONE HUNDRED FOURTH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION
ON

H.R 1561



MAY 8 AND 9, 1995



Printed for the use of the Committee on International Relations




93-948 CC



U.S. GXDVERNMENT PRINTING OF
WASHINGTON : 1995




For sale by the U.S. Government Printing Office
Superintendent of Documents, Congressional Sales Office, Washington, DC 20402
ISBN 0-16-0A7708-5



COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
BENJAMIN A. OILMAN, New York, Chairman



WILLIAM F. GOODLING, Pennsylvania

JAMES A. LEACH, Iowa

TOBY ROTH, Wisconsin

HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois

DOUG BEREUTER, Nebraska

CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey

DAN BURTON, Indiana

JAN MEYERS, Kansas

ELTON GALLEGLY, California

ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida

CASS BALLENGER, North Carolina

DANA ROHRABACHER, California

DONALD A. MANZULLO, Illinois

EDWARD R ROYCE, California

PETER T. KING, New York

JAY KIM, California

SAM BROWNBACK, Kansas

DAVID FUNDERBURK, North Carolina

STEVEN J. CHABOT, Ohio

MARSHALL "T^ARK" SANFORD, South

Carolina
MATT SALMON, Arizona
AMO HOUGHTON, New York



LEE H. HAMILTON, Indiana

SAM GEJDENSON, Connecticut

TOM LANTOS, California

ROBERT G. TORRICELLI, New Jersey

HOWARD L. BERMAN, California

GARY L. ACKERMAN, New York

HARRY JOHNSTON, Florida

ELIOT L. ENGEL, New York

ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American

Samoa
MATTHEW G. MARTINEZ, California
DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
ROBERT E. ANDREWS, New Jersey
ROBERT MENENDEZ, New Jersey
SHERROD BROWN, Ohio
CYNTHIA A. MCKINNEY, GeoiTgia
ALCEE L. HASTINGS, Florida
ALBERT RUSSELL WYNN, Maryland
MICHAEL R. MCNULTY, New York
JAMES P. MORAN, Virginia
VICTOR O. FRAZER, Virgin Islands (Ind.)



Richard J. Garon, Chief of Staff
Michael H. Van Dusen, Democratic Chief of Staff



SUBCOMMnTEE ON INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS
CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey, Chairman



BENJAMIN A. OILMAN, New York

WILLIAM F. GOODLING, Pennsylvania

HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois

PETER T. KING, New York

DAVID FUNDERBURK, North Carolina

MATT SALMON, Arizona

EDWARD R. ROYCE, California



TOM LANTOS, California
CYNTHIA A. MCKINNEY, Georgia
JAMES P. MORAN, Virginia
HOWARD L. BERMAN, California
ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American

Samoa
DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey



GroVER Joseph RbbS, Subcommittee Staff Director and Chief Counsel

Robert R. King, Democratic Professional Staff Member

David Wagner, Professional Staff Member

TatYANA SchuM, Staff Associate



(II)



CONTENTS



WITNESSES

Page
Monday, May 8, 1995:

Markup (no witnesses) 1

Tuesday, May 9, 1995:

Markup (no witnesses) 7

APPENDIX

H.R. 1561, American Overseas Interests Act, reprint of 9

Amendment in the nature of a substitute for Division B of H.R. 1561 offered

by Mr. Smith of New Jersey 88



(III)



MARKUP OF THE AMERICAN OVERSEAS
INTERESTS ACT— H.R 1561



MONDAY, MAY 8, 1995

House of Representatives,
Committee on International Relations,

Subcommittee on International

Operations and Human Rights,

Washington, DC.

The subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 10:10 a.m. in room
2255, Rayburn House Office Building, Hon. Christopher Smith
(chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Mr. Smith. The subcommittee will come to order.

Ladies and gentlemen, the committee meets today to consider the
bill H.R. 1561. The Chair wishes to make an opening statement,
and I will do so at this time.

I am very pleased to convene this meeting for the purpose of
marking up the first Foreign Relations Authorization Act to be pro-
duced by the Subcommittee on International Operations and
Human Rights.

Today's action is but a step in what promises to be a very ardu-
ous and a very difficult process, especially for those of us like my-
self who are very much in favor of important foreign aid to our
friends around the world.

I believe that this product reflects some important qualities of
this new subcommittee. This document is not only about inter-
national operations, it is also about human rights. Every structural
and fiscal decision has been taken with an eye toward preserving
core humanitarian programs, saving lives and promoting the just
interests of the American people.

In these difficult times, no area of government is immune from
close scrutiny and from the need to cut spending that is not abso-
lutely essential. This bill authorizes $12 billion over 2 years, but
it also cuts $721 million, or about 12 percent, over the same period
from fiscal year 1995 levels.

I am particularly proud that we were able to hold harmless a
small number of programs including refugees, security at our em-
bassies overseas, democracy initiatives and freedom broadcasting.
We also provided vital funds for peacekeeping, arms control, cul-
tural exchanges and scholarships, as well as for the basic structure
through which the U.S. foreign policy is conducted.

I am pleased that UNICEF actually gets a modest increase to
$206 million over 2 years, provided that it remains faithful to its
mission of protecting and helping children. I am also pleased that
the bill includes a $15 million earmark for each year for the War

(1)



Crimes Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, and $30 million to
allow us to end the so-called comprehensive plan of action for
Southeast Asian refugees with honor rather than dishonor. These
programs will serve the just interests of the United States and the
freedom-loving people everywhere.

I also would remind my colleagues that we hav':i had as part of
our preparation for the beginning of this process five hearings. On
Tuesday, February 7, we heard from the Honorable Richard Moose,
the Under Secretary for Management for the U.S. Department of
State.

On February 8, we heard from Madeleine Albright, our Perma-
nent Representative to the United Nations, and Doug Bennet, the
Assistant Secretary for International Organizations Affairs at the
Department of State for International Organizations, Conferences
and Committees.

On February 22, we heard from Ambassador Brunson McKinley,
who spoke to us about the situation regarding refugees.

On Thursday, February 23, we heard from John Holum, the Di-
rector of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, to describe
the administration's budget as it relates to AC DA.

And on March 1, we heard from Joseph Duffey, the Director of
the U.S. Information Agency, and Carl Grershman, the President for
the National Endowment for Democracy, to talk about those impor-
tant programs.

At this point I would like to yield to my good friend, but first just
let me sav also parenthetically that the leadership of the House
had asked us to begin markup last Monday. I asked that that be
postponed for a week. My feeling was that coming off of the recess,
that members might not have enough time to look at the hearing
records of those five hearings that I just described and other pro-
posals and would not have time to prepare amendments. And
again, this is only the first step in what promises to be a very, very
long process.

I understand in my consultations with the majority leader that
his job is not unlike that of an air traffic controller. He has got
many bills that have to fit into a glide slope that eventually gets
on the floor at a certain time, or our committee nms the risk, both
subcommittee and full committee, of becoming irrelevant, and of
this committee essentially punting, and the appropriators taking
on the necessary job and task of writing foreign aid.

So I think it is important that we move quickly. I am not happy
with the schedule. I can say that up front. I wish we had more
time. We just don't have it. But I did get an extra week as a result
of my request, and I am very grateful to the leadership for that.

I would like to yield to my good friend, Mr. Lantos, for any open-
ing statement he might have.

Mr. Lantos. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman.

I need not tell you the degree of friendship and affection I have
for you as a colleague and as an individual, and I trust that my
comments will not be misunderstood.

I find the procedure preposterous and unacceptable, and I will
not participate in this markup. I am sick and tired of functioning
in a deliberative legislative body as if we had lubrication jobs to
finish before the midnight closing at the gas station.



3

Today the House is not in session. None of my colleagues on the
Democratic side are here. I came in as a personal courtesy to you
because of our long-standing friendship and I believe mutual re-
spect.

We did not receive the final version of this proposal until late
Friday evening. I had other commitments over the weekend, and
I believe that the scope, nature, extent of the proposed revisions in
our international policymaking and the agencies that carried out do
not lend themselves to haphazard, slipshod, quickie solutions.

We really have two options. The Republicans on the subcommit-
tee may proceed to markup by themselves, which is fine, although
a quorum is not present, and I make a point of order at the conclu-
sion of my remarks that a quorum is not present, or we can re-
schedule this meeting to give the Democratic Members a tiny frac-
tion of the courtesy and decency we have shown our Republican
colleagues throughout the years in evolving a bipartisan foreign
policy.

This is no way to run a railroad. I don't think Dick Armey is run-
ning an air traffic control center; I think he is fortunate for this
term to be majority leader in the U.S. House of Representatives.
He needs to show the degree of courtesy that every member here
deserves and the subject matter merits.

So we have really one of two options. You may choose to go
ahead on your own without Democratic participation, in which case
we shall raise all of the objections, propose our amendments, make
our points in full committee, or if it is your pleasure, and I am
happy to accommodate you either way, we may reschedule this ses-
sion for tomorrow afternoon, giving the Democratic Members, most
of whom, as I understand it, are still out of town, at least a few
hours' opportunity to review this very complex piece of legislation.

I had a lengthy discussion with the Secretary of State yesterday
afternoon who shares my concern that this is a serious matter,
which cannot be handled in this preposterous fashion.

This is not surgery that needs to be performed by noon today.
Mr. Helms, Mr. Oilman and others are proposing dramatic changes
in the way the United States of America conducts its foreign af-
fairs. For the life of me, I can't see any rational human being feel-
ing that we are under the gun to act, with my colleagues never
having seen this legislation, with my never having seen this legis-
lation.

My friendship and affection for you is undiminished, but I find
the procedure preposterous, unacceptable, and I will have no part
of it, and I make a point of order that a quorum is not present.

Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Smith. Thank you, Mr. Lantos, for your statement, and I cer-
tainly have some empathy for what you are saying, because I too
feel like we are under the gun. But as I said in my opening, there
has been several months of deliberations on this, the hearings have
been held, and again, this is just a first step. There will be several
areas where various parts of this legislation will be considered, and
at that point amendments will obviously be offered, and then it
continues right on to the floor and to conference committee. So this
is not the end of the game.



I would like to direct the staff to take measures to secure a
quorum, and the subcommittee will be in recess for 15 minutes,

[Recess.]

Mr. Smith. The subcommittee will reconvene, having secured a
quorum.

Just let me say again with regret, I am very sorry that Mr. Lan-
tos and other Democrats have not been here. We did give notice on
Tuesday and Wednesday that this markup would occur, and again,
it was postponed a full week to enable members to take the time
to get here and to look over proposals in the legislation that was
pending before them.

Now, let me just

Mr. King. Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Smith. The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.

Mr. King. I move that the chairman oe authorized to declare a
recess as appropriate.

Mr. Smith. The question is on a motion from the gentleman from
New York.

All those in favor say aye.

All those opposed.

The ayes have it.

The subcommittee will now proceed to the consideration of the
bill with the Chair's amendment in the nature of a substitute, and
without objection, the first reading of the bill will be dispensed
with.

[The bill, H.R. 1561, appears in the appendix.]

Mr. Smith. Without objection, the amendment in the nature of
a substitute will be considered as read.

[The amendment offered by Mr. Smith appears in the appendix.]

Mr. Smith. The Chair now recognizes himself for a brief state-
ment on the amendment in the nature of a substitute.

Just let me say that as I said in my opening statement, that this
amendment in tne nature of a substitute represents an important
step forward in the process by which we move forward toward inte-
grating foreign policy concerns, human rights concerns and our re-
sponsibility to the American taxpayer.

Having said that, this amendment is respectfully submitted to all
of the members of the subcommittee and then hopefully to the full
committee, and I know there will be several changes and amend-
ments offered as we go through this process.

Although the amendment in the nature of a substitute is open
to amendment at any point, for the sake of convenience I would ask
for imanimous consent that it be considered for amendment title by
title.

Without objection, the amendment in the nature of the substitute
will be considered title by title. And as I said, the Staff Director
will designate the first title, which is Title XXI.

Mr. Ei:ES. Authorization of appropriations for Department of
State, and certain international affairs functions and activities.

Mr. Smith. Are there any amendments to Title XXI? The Chair
recognizes Mr. Royce.

Mr. Royce. Yes, Mr. Chairman. I have got — I think the members
here have a suggested amendment, add the following new para-
graph at the end of section 2104.



Mr. Smith. The clerk will read the amendment.

Mr. ROYCE. Let me just read the amendment. It is just a clarify-
ing amendment, Mr. Chairman, and it says, as used in this section,
refugee camp means anyplace in which people who left Vietnam,
Camoodia or Laos are housed or held by a government or inter-
national organization, no matter how such place is designated by
such government or organization. So I would just like to make that
clarifying amendment if I could at this time, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Smith. Is there any further comment on the amendment?

I thank the gentleman for his amendment. I was consulted by
the gentleman on his amendment and I think it makes a very im-
portant addition to the language in the bill and the underlying sub-
stitute.

All those in favor of the amendment as offered by the gentleman
from California say aye.

All those opposed.

The ayes appear to have it, and the amendment is agreed to.

Are there any other amendments to Title XXI?

If not, we will designate Title XXII, the Staff Director will des-
ignate Title XXII.

Mr. Rees. Title XXII, Department of State authorities and activi-
ties.

Mr. Smith. Is there any amendments to Title XXII?

Hearing none, the clerk will designate Title XXIII.

Mr. Rees. Title XXIII, organization of the Department of State,
Department of State personnel, the Foreign Service.

Mr. Smith. Are there any amendments to Title XXIII?

Hearing none, the Staff Director will designate Title XXIV.

Mr. Rees. Title XXTV, United States public diplomacy activities
for United States informational, educational and cultural pro-
grams.

Mr. Smith. Are there any amendments to this title?

Hearing none, the Staff Director will designate the next title.

Mr. Rees. Title XXV, international organizations and commis-
sions.

Mr. Smith. Are there any amendments to Title XXV?

Hearing none, the Staff Director will designate Title XXVI.

Mr. Rees. Title XXVI, foreign policy provisions.

Mr. Smith. Are there any amendments to this title of the sub-
stitute?

Hearing none, the Staff Director will designate the Title XXVII.

Mr. Rees. Title XXVII, congressional statements.

Mr. Smith. Are there any amendments to this Title?

Hearing none — OK. We have gotten to where we are now much
sooner than we thought we would.

Mr. King. Mr. Chairman, I move the previous question on the
bill and amendment thereto.

Mr. Smith. The previous question has been ordered.

No further debate is in order. The question is on the amendment
in the nature of a substitute as amended.

All those if favor say aye. Aye.

All those opposed.

The question now occurs on the bill.



The subcommittee will recess to gamer the requisite number of
members to report the bill to the full committee.

We are recessed until 12 o'clock.

[Recess.]

Mr. Smith. The subcommittee will reconvene just to announce to
the members and to those interested that the subcommittee will
stand in recess until tomorrow at 12:30, at which time we will take
up the amendment in the nature of a substitute. And we will con-
vene in 2172, and that is at 12:30. So the subcommittee stands in
recess.

[Whereupon, at 12:09 p.m., the subcommittee recessed, to recon-
vene at 12:36 p.m., Tuesday, May 9, 1995.]



MAREOJP OF THE AMERICAN OVERSEAS
INTERESTS ACT— H.R. 1561



TUESDAY, MAY 9, 1995

House of Representatives,
Committee on International Relations,

Subcommittee on International

Operations and Human Rights,

Washington, DC.

The subcommittee met, pursuant to call, at 12:36 p.m., in room
2712, Raybum House Office Building, Hon. Christopner H. Smith
(chairman of the subcommittee) presiding.

Mr. Smith. The subcommittee will reconvene.

And I want to thank my colleagues for being here this afternoon.

Before we recessed this markup yesterday, the subcommittee had
considered the amendment in the nature of a substitute for amend-
ment title by title.

One amendment was agreed to. It was an amendment that was
offered by the distinguished gentleman, Mr. Royce.

The previous question was then moved and ordered on the sub-
stitute amendment and on the bill.

The subcommittee then agreed to the amendment in the nature
of a substitute.

The question is now on whether to report the bill to the full com-
mittee.

And do I hear a motion.

Mr. Oilman. So moved.

Mr. Smith. OK The question now occurs on reporting the
amendment in the nature of a substitute to the full committee.

All those in favor, say aye.

All those opposed.

In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes have it. The motion is
agreed to. The bill, as amended, will be reported with a favorable
recommendation.

Mr. Hyde. Does the gentleman want a roll call for the record?

Mr. Smith. OK. The Chief of Staff will call the role.

Mr. Rees. Mr. Oilman.

Mr. Oilman. Aye.

Mr. Rees. Mr. Hyde.

Mr. Hyde. Aye.

Mr. Rees. Mr. Goodling.

Mr. GOODLENG. Aye.

Mr. Rees. Mr. King.

Mr. King. Aye.

Mr. Rees. Mr. Royce.

(7)



8

Mr. ROYCE. Aye.

Mr. Rees. Mr. Funderburk.

Mr. Funderburk. Aye.

Mr. Rees. Mr. Salmon.

Mr. Salmon. Aye.

Mr. Smith. And the Chair votes aye.

The clerk will report the tally.

Mr. Rees. The vote is eight in favor, zero opposed.

Mr. Smith. Thank you very much.

The subcommittee is adjourned.

[Whereupon, at 12:38 p.m., the subcommittee was adjourned.]



APPENDIX



104TH CONGRESS
1st Session



H. R. 1561



To consolidate the foreign aiTairs agencies of the United States; to authorize appro-
priations for the Department of State and related agencies for flscal years 1996
and 1997; to responsibly reduce the authorizations of appropriations for United
States foreign assistance programs for fiscal years 1996 and 1997, and for other
purposes.



IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

May 3, 1995

Mr. Oilman introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on
International Relations, and in addition to the Committee on Rules, for a period
to be subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for consideration of
such provisions as fall within the jurisdiction of the committee concerned



A BILL

To consolidate the foreign affairs agencies of the United States; to authorize appro-
priations for the Department of State and related agencies for fiscal years 1996
and 1997; to responsibly reduce the authorizations of appropriations for United
States foreign assistance programs for fiscal years 1996 and 1997, and for other
purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the "American Overseas Interests Act of 1995".

SEC. 2. ORGANIZATION OF ACT INTO DIVISIONS; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

(a) Divisions. — This Act is organized into three divisions as follows:

(1) Division A — Consolidation of Foreign Affairs Agencies.

(2) Division B — Foreign Relations Authorizations.

(3) Division C — Foreign Assistance Authorizations.

(b) Table of Contents.— The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short tiUe.

Sec. 2. Organization of Act into divisions; table of contents.

DIVISION A— CONSOLIDATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AGENCIES

TITLE I— GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 101. Short title.

Sec. 102. Congressional findings.

Sec. 103. Purposes.

Sec. 104. Definitions.

TITLE n— UNITED STATES ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT AGENCY

Chapter 1 — General Provisions

Sec. 201. Effective dale.
Sec. 202. References in title.

Chapter 2— Abolition of United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and Tbanbfkr op
Functions to Secretary ok State

Sec. 211. Abolition of United States Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
Sec. 212. Transfer of functions to Secretary of State.

Chapter 3 — ^Reorganization op Department of State Relating to Functionb Tbanbperreo Under This

Title

Sec. 221. Reorganization plan.
Sec. 222. Principal officers.



(9)



10



CHAPTBB 4 — CONPORMINO AMBNDMENTB

Sec. 241. References.

Sec. 242. Repeal of establishment of agency.

Sec. 243. Repeal of positions and offices.

Sec. 244. Transfer of authorities and functions under the Arms Control and Disarmament Act to the Secretary

of SUte.
Sec. 245. Conforming amendments toother provisions of law.

TITLE in— UhfTTED STATES INFORMATION AGENCY

CHAPTEB 1 — GBNEBAL PBOVI8ION8

Sec. 301. Effective date.

Chapter 2 — Aboution of United States Information AcBNcr and Transfer of Punctionb to SBCRBTARy

OF State

Sec. 311. Abolition of United States Information Agency.
Sec. 312. Transfer of functions to Secretary of State.

Chapter 3 — Reorganization of Department of State Relating to Functions Transferred Under This

Title

Sec. 321. Reorganization plan.
Sec. 322. Principal officers.



Chapter 4 — Conforming Amendments

Sec. 341. References.

Sec. 342. Abolition of Office of Inspector General of the United States Information Agency and transfer of func-
tions to Office of Inspector General of the Department of State.

Sec. 343. Amendments to title 5.

Sec. 344. Amendments to United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948.

Sec. 345. Amendments to the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 G^ulbright-Hays Act).

Sec. 346. International broadcasting activities.

Sec. 347. Television broadcasting to Cuba.

Sec. 348. Radio broadcasting to Cuba.

Sec. 349. National Endowment for Democracy.

Sec. 350. United States scholarship program for developing countries.

Sec. 351. Fascell Fellowship Board.

Sec. 352. National Security Education Board.


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. House. Committee on InterAmerican Overseas Interests Act : markup before the Subcommittee on International Operations and Human Rights of the Committee on International Relations, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session, on H.R. 1561, May 8 and 9, 1995 → online text (page 1 of 19)