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Combating crime in the District of Columbia : hearing before the Subcommittee on Crime of the Committee on the Judiciary, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, first session, June 22, 1995 online

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Summer Fun For Youth

"We are here, said Debra Phillips. Executive
Director of the Eastern Branch of the Metropolitan



Boys & Girls Club, as she described summer
activities available for youth

Despite rumors and debates on the future
operation of the facility, located at 17th &
Massachusetts Ave SE. several activities are
planned for this summer The Boys & Girls Club
plans a 6-week Summer Camp beginning
Wednesday. July 5. for children ages 5-12 The camp
runs each day from 7:30 am to 6:00 p m and costs
$40 OOweek Parents can register children now The
facility will also be open until 9 00 p m each night.
In addition to the gymnasium the Eastern Branch
plans to reopen the swimming pool and offer t-ball.
tutonng and leadership programs

Holy Comforter'St Cyprian School offers all
neighborhood youth the opportunity to take part in
its "Summer Enrichment Program It runs from
June 26-July 31 for children in grades 1-6 The
program offers computer skills, arts & crafts,
language arts mathematics and religion at the
school, located at 15th & East Capitol Sts SE The
cost IS $50 00 week and registration begins June 5.



83



CAPITOL HILL AREA, WASHINGTON DC
Part 1 Crime Reports, January through May 1995



26 ;







42


S3


145


26




5





314


27







6


21


19


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93


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376


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Part 1 Crime Reports, January through May 1994













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151


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Percentage Change, 1995 vs. 1994



Bui

17
20
21
24


Homieido

ERR
ERR
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auf

ERR
ERR
ERR

ERR


Robbwv

-16 2%
-12 5%
165 7%

300 0%


17 2%
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-30 2%

360 0%


Ufcany

■ 12 1%

■15%

-47 2%

2 3%


OUw
Lifonv

21 4%
■2 0%
•7 7%

20 8%


SloMfl

Alls

81 8%
■21 7%

20 0%
■37 5%


15 4%

■7 7%

-40 0%

300 0%


tasD

ERR
ERR
00%
ERR


49%
■9 9%
-212%
29 9%


25
26
27
29


■100 0%
0%
ERR
0%


ERR

-100 0%

ERR

ERR


27 8%
160 0%
-40 0%
100%


84 1%

50 0%
75 0%
35 3%


47 2%
126 6%
■13 6%

163 6%


42 9%
13 0%
71 4%

55 6%


60 0%
33 3%
00%
9 3%


16 7%
■54 5%
■55 6%

■13 8%


ERR
ERR
ERR
ERR


519%
73 5%
3 3%

73 3%


30
31
152
153


ERR
100 0%
•50 0%
'50 0%


■ 100 0%

-100 0%

ERR

ERR


27 8%
46 7%
65 2%
37 5%


13 7%
-24 2%
-12 7%
-30 0%


■3 3%
36 4%

29 5%
52 6%


34 4%

7 7%

3 7%

■23 2%


9 1%
-12 9%
•105%
19 2%


0%
10 0%
36 7%
■12 5%


ERR
ERR
ERR
ERR


•5 7%
9 7%
9 8%
4 6%


154
155
156
157

Total


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ERR

-50 0%

-25 0%

■10 OH


0%
ERR
ERR
ERR

22Jli


182%

200 0%

00%

66 7%

31.7%


25 5%

-62 5%

15 6%

4 9%

10 2%


21 6%
-4 3%
80 6%
91 7%

JSJJk


■20 6%
■26 8%
13 8%
■24 1%

■l,61t


•15 4%

15 4%

■22 2%
-48 6%


■5 1%
■136%
39 1%
34 8%


■100 0%
ERR

•100 0%
ERR

•rimt


4 4%

-6 6%
27 9%

6%



SOURCE M«UopoMjn Poire* D*p«nm«nt






84



ATTACHMENT #6

IDEAS FOR PUBLIC SAFETY/POLICE RESOURCE EXPANSION

The following ideas are from Gregg Edwards, PhD DSc , a
community activist in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood, MPD
district #4, in conversation with Sally Byington.

Police resources, especially manpower, is limited. Efforts
to increase officer numbers quickly can backfire if quantity
rather than quality is the rule. Also, research shows that
increasing the number of sworn officers does not in and by
itself reduce crime.

Listed below are two ideas on how to increase the number of
personnel that can undertake policing tasks.

Create the Deputy Corps (Auxiliary Officers)

This corps would build on the existing Reserve Corps.
Added to its numbers would be a Youth Corps, Retired Officer
Corps, and Private Sector Patrol Personnel. Training by MPD
would be given to all subgroups. A set number of members
would be able to receive advanced training in weapons and
after successful completion, be certified to use them for
defensive purposes. The deputies could relieve the sworn
police of approximately 80% of their routine work and tasks.
They could work part-time, at special events, or when
available and needed. The retired officer corps could have
additional, selected assignments.

Create a District Trooper Position

This position would be opened to experienced patrol officers
with outstanding records who choose to remain in the officer
rank but seek and are deserving of a career challenge that
requires enhanced technical rather than managerial skills.

The troopers would be recommended by the Sector Captains and
Commanders. They would be officers who like to solve
problems, work well with the community, and can commit to a
three-year program of systematic solving of hard core,
entrenched problems. They must be willing to work with
their counterparts in other districts as well as with those
in other enforcement agencies. They would be charged to
carry forth their duties with creativity and ingenuity.

Initially, their numbers would be small. The first group
would help develop the goals and operating procedures for
the unit. Their training would be done in cooperation with
federal law enforcement officials and at a federal training
facility. Rolling tenure, annual evaluation, and peer-
community-outside agency review would help to make these
officers models of excellence.



85

Mr. Bryant of Tennessee. Thank you, Ms. Byington, especially
for your graphic display, and I think you are right about my level
in understanding this.

We do have a rollcall vote, and I don't know how many we've got,
probably just one. If there's just one, if we could recess until about
12:15. Mr. Foreman and Ms. Nero, if you could, if all of you could
wait, and we apologize, but we've got to get over there and vote
within a certain time frame. If there is an additional vote after
that, let's just reconvene about 10 minutes after that last vote, but,
otherwise, about 12:15. And until such time, the hearing is re-
cessed.

[Recess.]

Mr. Bryant of Tennessee. If we might call this hearing back
from recess and pick up with Mr. Foreman, his statement.

While we're waiting, I might just advise, we did have a second
vote and anticipate more votes throughout the afternoon and fairly
quickly, I think. So let me, again, apologize for this, but we'll make
the best of if we can.

Should I call you "Mr. Foreman" or "Coach?" How about Mr.
Foreman?

STATEMENT OF JAMES F. FOREMAN, COORDINATOR, METRO
ORANGE COALITION

Mr. Foreman. You can call me a combination of many things.
[Laughter.]

Mr. Bryant of Tennessee. All right, it's your turn.

Mr. Foreman. I am called — whoever is addressing, the names
vary quite a bit. But I'll let you guys call me "Knee Cap," but most
folks call me "Jim Foreman." And any name will fit; that's for sure.

But good afternoon, morning, whatever the case may be. I'm
happy to be here to say what I think needs to be said.

I am an Orange Hatter, represent approximately 17,000 people
in the Metropolitan Washington area. The Orange Hat movement
now has created across the country. We are located in 14 different
States besides the Washington area and still growing. We might be
in your State, but I don't know, but we're still growing anyway.

We are a group of people, as we say, neighborhood reclaimers.
We go out; we try to, and so far we've been very successful. We
haven't missed a shot yet of reclaiming the community that we're
going to, especially communities that are infested with drugs and
drug dealers, open air drug markets. We are proud to say that we
close open air drug markets with the help and the utilization of
people who live in those communities and the police department,
if they are willing to help. If not, we go and do it nonetheless; we
will be there. If the people desire it to be done, we make doubly
sure it happens.

We, our organization is not funded by any government, receives
no funds from anyone, private foundation, no one else. We are a
self-sustaining organization. We pay our own bills with the mem-
bership in the organization. We are a non-dues-paying organiza-
tion, but, nevertheless, we get the money from members to do what
we need to be done when it needs to be done. Perhaps we are prob-
ably the only organization up there who has no desire for Federal



86

funds, don't want Federal funds, don't care to have them no way,
shape, nor form.

Mr. Bryant of Tennessee. I knew I hked you. [Laughter.]

Mr. FoRKMAN. But there's one thing that the Federal Govern-
ment has that they should give up that they won't give up because
of some antiquated law that you have, and I think that needs to
leave the books, too. FBI had some radios that they were not using.
We use light radios on the street, but, according to the law, thev
could not give them up. They had to trash them, but we couldn t
use them. And there are fights on the streets to get rid of drugs
on the streets.

We need — to me, I was listening to the first panel make up dis-
cussion, and you have yet a DA, district attorney, who's here. Of
groups in this Washington area, I think we are the largest group
in existence in this area that deals and fights crime on the streets.
But, as yet, I have never met Mr. Holder. The only time I have
seen him is on TV and here I've seen him. I have a chief of police
in my city I have only met once. I have a police department with
a lot of sectors in my city where at night in some cases we only
have three, four, and five officers in the whole police district on the
street. We have groups of people scattered throughout the districts
all over the place out in the street wearing Orange Hats dealing
and trying to rectify what's on the street that's there for their com-
munities, and we have no backup.

Right now, we have — right now, we have more FBI agents out in
the street with our groups than we have metropolitan police out in
the street with our groups, and that is unbelievable imbalance; no
question about it. They have been very diligent, the FBI has, in
outreaching with Orange Hatters on the street, and they have
made a heck of one tremendous difference.

The former chief, Chief Fulwood, sitting here, was chief of police.
As a matter of fact, we started at the same time that he was chief
of police or right before he came in. Chief Turner was around at
the time. Chief Fulwood came in four months later, I believe, but
there was no problem; we had tremendous cooperation. The district
commanders were in for the fight. We got great support, and that's
why we made so many tremendous gains at that particular time,
because we had support from the top.

And at that time when we first started out we had open air drug
markets everywhere in this town. You couldn't turn a corner with-
out an open air drug market. Now if you're going to go to an open
air drug market, you have to go and look and look and look to find
one. The people that live in those communities reached the point
where they said, "No more," and they went out and made it happen
themselves. They are still there. Some groups are 6, 7 years old,
and they are still on the streets. They love their communities now.
They're still patrolling their communities and they say never again
will it happen like it was before, and they are still there.

We still have some groups, some communities, who are just com-
ing aboard. They have reached a point their suffering is too great.
They cannot bear it no longer. So they are coming out now and
we're going in to assist them and help them to rid their community
of what is bothering them, and that is mostly drug and criminal
activities.



87

We are good and we know we are good, which is a good way to
be. We will, we can what we do here do any place else in this coun-
try, and we have been doing just that, traveling from State to State
for all those who request us to do and help others in given areas
to establish the same thing we do here. We're very unique about
that, too, because we don't charge people to come and do and to
help them, except for plane fare and hotel room. Other than that,
we will be there to help those who need help. You'll see if you have
a problem there, if you have people there who need help, we're
going to help them, assist them, show them how to do the same
thing we do here without their community having to come up with
thousands and thousands of dollars to pay for somebody to come
in to demonstrate to them what to do. Not only that, but we will
stay there with them to help them, to show them, and make doubly
sure that it works within their community.

If we here had what we need, the support that we need through
the court system, through the district attorney's office, and through
the local police department here, then we could make a bigger im-
pact here in the Washington, Metropolitan Washington area, but
we don't. So right now our progress is much slower than it should
be. Most of the — unfortunately, most of the government agencies
here in this area we don't really have a working relationship with.
We have a hard time trying to get houses perked up. We have a
hard time trying to get drug — abandoned houses drug users use
boarded up. We have a hard time trying to get vehicles, abandoned
vehicles, that the drug dealers use, utilize to stash their drugs in,
removed. The blight in the city is tremendous. We have more blight
now in the last couple of years than we had in the history of Wash-
ington, and it is growing.

We are — our organization is made up of mostly female. Eighty-
five percent of the group is female. Some of our groups are 100 per-
cent female. No question about it, they are very effective. They get
the job done. Most of the folks sitting here on this panel are mem-
bers of an Orange Hat Group some place. I've been talking to an
inordinate — a lot of Orange Hatters probably who are sitting into
the next panel. They are members of an Orange Hat Group some
place besides other groups that they belong to, but everybody with-
in the community, irregardless of what group they may belong to,
has a tendency to be part of an Orange Hat Group.

We used to have a Congressperson here who used to be Speaker
of the House, Mr. Foley. He was volunteering in North Lincoln
Park Orange Hat Group. He walked it a couple of times. He was
afraid, too, like the rest of the folks on the street, but he came out
and he supported it. Perhaps a few other Congress people here in
this House might be a member of an Orange Hat Group, other than
I know that Congressman Foley was a member of a group.

My thing is this: we can help you to help your constituents in
your communities, if you allow us to do that. Not only that, but we
are willing; we want to do that. We want to spread it throughout
the country. We want to make it work. We want people in all
States, in all cities, in all rural areas to have a better way of life,
and we want to make it work and we can make a difference. We
can make it work.



88

We are a group of all volunteers. We have no paid staff. As a
matter of fact, we don't have a treasurer nowhere. But, neverthe-
less, we get it done and we do well by it, but I know we — under
Chief Fulwood, we instituted something new a long time ago, and
that was the D.C. National Guard. We utilized the D.C. National
Guard on the streets, too, in that fight to rid the streets of drugs.
They furnish big, fat floodlights, the big bright lights that light the
street up and make daylight out of nighttime. They were very effec-
tive. They are very effective now, but as I travel from State to
State outside Washington, DC, the Guard in that area don't have
a program of that sort, don't have permission to do so. What they
have — nevertheless, they have the equipment that can be utilized
by the people who live in those communities in the drug fight in
those communities, and to have that equipment sitting aside doing
nothing but rusting away and the neighborhoods and the people
are suffering doesn't make sense. It should be utilized. People in
those communities should have permission to utilize Guard equip-
ment and to make it work. It cost money for the Guard because
this is a special appropriation that they utilize here in Washington,
but the return is tremendous because you get peace in the commu-
nities; you get happy people; you get people who are not under the
threat of death any longer; you get people who can function, and
you save children. You don't have the great death rate and you
don't have the big, big shootouts like we have if you do not utilize
such equipment.

So you are the people who can make it work. You are the people
who can get the Guard involved. You can get permission for that
to happen, even if you have to pay a special administration to
make sure that it works. I, myself, the group, urge you to do so.
It makes it easier for us to function with people in your States as
we travel around.

And anything from the Hill or anybody from the Hill that is will-
ing to be a part of, we would like to know, too. We would like to
have some spokespersons from the Hill to come out to deal with the
groups, to speak to the groups, and things of that particular na-
ture. Not only that, as you walk around your communities that you
live on Capitol Hill — we have Orange Hat Groups here on Capitol
Hill, too. Talk to them; deal with them; be a part of them. That
is encouragement, too. They inspire people to go on to do better and
hang in there tougher and longer. It is good for you, too. It's your
community now. You live here and you spend more time here than
you spend home. I don't know if that's good or bad, but you do.
[Laughter.] So you should support your own community, too, not
only the community that you have at home, but the community
that you have here. It is good for you and good for the community.

And at that time that's all I have to say.

[The prepared statement of Mr. Foreman follows:]



89

Prepared Statement of James F. Foreman, Coordinator, Metro Orange

Coalition

Citizen patrols are perhaps the most effective way of
signaling community involvement. Citizen patrols have turned
the tables on drug dealers by using the same techniques dealers
employ to gain territory, by banding together as a group; by
broadcasting memberships in a highly organized group, citizens
can thwart drug activities in their neighborhoods.

In order to be effective citizen patrols must be highly
visible, must be serious, and must be willing to take concrete
action to red their neighborhoods of drug dealers.

This means patrol members should patrol when the drug
dealers are out on the street; the most active hours are 7 pm
to 11 pm. It is also recommended that orange hats be purchased
before the group becomes active on the street. Various kinds
of equipment can be used to increase the perception that the
group is part of an even larger conitigent and is a direct link
with law enforcement. For example, patrols should carry and
use walkie-talkies, video cameras, note pads and pencils.
While on patrol, members should collect as much information
as possible about the drug dealers and their customers: this
means noting, names, dates, times, locations of transactions,
places where drugs are slashed, and license plate numbers,
description of vehicles observed been used by dealers and
customers. Dealers concerning individuals is also helpful -
sex, race, height, weight. The more detailed the information,
the more likely it is that the police will target an individual
for surveillance.

While drug dealers may know that Orange Hat patrols have
no arrest and enforcement power, drug customers are often shaken
by the presence of well organized Orange Hatters taking their
license plate number, jotting down their description and taking
video picture of their transaction. When patrols conduct these
kind activities on a regular basis, rapidity that is starting
to new Orange Hat Patrol members. Remarks from one new member,
"It's amazing you come around the corner and the drug dealer
freeze in their tracks like a deer caught in a light. Cars
start backing down the street so you can't read their license
plate numbers. Within minutes of pulling out a video camcorder,
there isn't a dealer within sight, where before there was a
dozen or more drug dealers blocking the sidewalk.

The overall effect of Orange Hat patrols is to throw an
element of uncertainty into the marketplaces to keep the market
place off balance and increase the element of distrust already
present in the drug dealer-buyer relationship.



90

A drive through drug customer who spots a group of people
carry the walkie-talkies, wearing bright orange hats, and talking
down license plate numbers is not quite sure what is happening.
Are the police setting him up? Who is that person on the walkie-
talkie? Why is that person taking my picture? Rather then risk
arrest or publicity, most drug drive away, mark the location
as one that is now risky at best. After a ]ust a few weeks
of dedicated effort, every patrol reports that drug activity
goes into a sharp decline.

Citizen patrols do more than just discouraged drug dealing,
however. They also change how the police view the entire'
community. A common interest in the neighborhood and to
dramatically increase police patrols within the community.
With increased police presence and improved information provided
by Orange Hat Patrols members.

Experience in communities across the Metro area has shown
that violence by drug dealers against Orange Hat members is
extremely rare. Dealers are loathe to draw attention to
themselves, and recognize that assaulting an Orange Hat member
is just one step removed from assaulting a police officer.
Nonetheless, precautions should be taken to avoid physical
confrontation verbal affronts between drug dealers and buyers
and Orange Hat patrols has proven not to be drug-related
violence, but membership attrition, especially after immediate
goals have been achieved. However, several steps have proven
effective at keep patrols enthusiasm and membership up.

The first step is to disseminate information about the
patrols activities. A well written flyer about the patrol should
be distributed to homes and mailboxes in the neighborhood.
In addition, neighborhood rallies of marches can help launch
an Orange Hat Patrol recruitment effort and early investment
in Orange Hats, Walkie-talkies and other equipment can help
solidity group membership.

I have witnessed the positive effects of Orange Hats
involvement in Washington, D.C, neighborhoods. They helped
restore not only order and a drug-free area, but liberty to
neighborhoods that were the victims of some of society's worst
predators.

The very notion of individual liberty had been turned up
side down in the neighborhood. Law-abiding citizens were being
held prisoners in their own homes. Their jailers were not
government prison wardens and guards. They were violent
criminals, who roam the streets with impunity, taking what they


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