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^COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION

(ENTERTAINMENT— PART 1)



HEARING

BEFORE THE

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

EIGHTY-THIRD CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION



JANUARY 13 AND 18, 1954



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities



INCLUDING INDEX




i



UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
42885 WASHjattOTHf-i 1954





Boston Public Library
Superintendent of Documents




COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES
United States House of Representatives

HAROLD H. VBLDE, Illinois, Chairman

BERNARD W. KEARNEY, New York FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania

DONALD L. JACKSON, California MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri

KIT CLARDY, Michigan CLYDE DOYLE, California

GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio JAMES B. FRAZIER, Jh., Tennessee

Robert L. Kunzig, Counsel

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., Counsel

Thomas W. Beale, Sr., Chief Clerk

Raphael I. Nixon, Director of Research



CONTENTS



Page

January 13, 1954 : Testimony of Allan E. Sloane 3851

January 18, 1954 : Testimony of Howard Bay 3879

Index 3897



in



Public Law 601, 79th Congress

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946], chapter
753, 2d session, which provides :

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States
of America in Congress assembled, * * *

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Rule X

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES

****** *

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine member?

Rule XI

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES
*******

(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities.

(A) Un-American activities.

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit-
tee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent,
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States,
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa-
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and
(iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any neces-
sary remedial legislation.

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such in-
vestigation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable.

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting,
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person
designated by any such chairman or member.



RULES ADOPTED BY THE 83d CONGRESS

House Resolution 5, January 3, 1953
*******

Rule X

STANDING COMMITTEES

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Con-
gress, the following standing committees :

*******
(q) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine members.
*******

Rule XI

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES



17. Committee on Un-American Activities.

(a) Un-American Activities.

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommittee,
is authorized to make from time to time, investigations of (1) the extent, char-
acter, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States,
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop-
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu-
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress
in any necessary l'emedial legislation.

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi-
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable.

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance of
such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any
member designated by such chairman, and may be served by any person desig-
nated by any such chairman or member.

VI



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTBATION
(ENTERTAINMENT— PAKT 1)



WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 13, 1954

United States House of Representatives,

Subcommittee of the Committee on

Un-American Activities,

Washington, D. G.

executtve session *

The subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities
met, pursuant to notice, at 2:30 p. m., in room 225, Old House Office
Building, the Honorable Harold H. Velde (chairman) presiding.

Committee members present: Representative Harold H. Velde
(chairman) and Representative Morgan M. Moulder.

Staff members present: Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., counsel for this
hearing ; Dolores Anderson, reporter.

TESTIMONY OF ALLAN E. SLOANE, ACCOMPANIED BY HIS COUNSEL,

SIDNEY V. SMITH

Mr. Velde. Will you stand and raise your right hand, please ?

In the testimony you are about to give, do you solemnly swear to tell
the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?

Mr. Sloane. I do, sir.

Mr. Velde. Let the record show that I have appointed a subcom-
mittee, consisting of Mr. Moulder and myself, Mr. Velde, as chairman,
for the purposes of this hearing.

Will you proceed, please, Mr. Tavenner ?

Mr. Tavenner. Will you state your name, please?

Mr. Sloane. My name, sir, is Allan E. Sloane.

Mr. Tavenner. Are you accompanied by counsel, Mr. Sloane?

Mr. Sloane. I am, sir.

Mr. Tavenner. Will counsel please identify himself for the record ?

Mr. Smith. I am Sidney V. Smith, 701 Tower Building, Washing-
ton, D. C.

Mr. Tavenner. Mr. Sloane, are you here today in response to a sub-
pena by this committee?

Mr. Sloane. No ; I am not, sir.

Mr. Tavenner. You are here as a result of your own voluntary desire
to appear as a witness before this committee then ?

Mr. Sloane. That is correct, sir.



1 Released by the full committee.

3851



3852 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (ENTERTALNMENT)

Mr. Tavexxer. Mr. Chairman, this witness is appearing as a result,
I understand, of the invitations which have been given by the com-
mittee from time to time to persons who have been in any way con-
nected or affiliated with communism to come before it and give the
committee such facts as they may have.

Mr. Velde. I might say that I am sure the members of this commit-
tee, and I myself, especially, appreciate your willingness to come and
give us this information. I am sure the information will be very
helpful to this committee in doing its work. Mr. Moulder?

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Chairman, I just wanted to refer to the fact that
our counsel is referring to the public invitations which have been ex-
tended by the committee. You do mean the public announcements,
do you not, Mr. Counsel ?

Mr. Tavexxer. That is true. No member of the staff has endeav-
ored in any way to bring about the appearance of this witness. It is
entirely voluntary on his part.

Mr. Sloane, will you state for the committee, please, what your
formal educational training has been?

Mr. Sloaxe. My formal educational training, sir, consists of the
public schools of Paterson, N. J., my hometown ; East Side High
School, also in Paterson, N. J. ; a degree of bachelor of arts from the
College of the City of New York, class of 1935 ; a degree of master of
science from Columbia University School of Journalism, 1936. Might
I presume upon you, sir, to add to this the reasons I am here ?

Mr. Tavexner. Surely.

Mr. Sloane. If you don't mind. I think perhaps you gentlemen
will be very, very interested in the fact that I could not any longer
wait for what appeared to me to be my own conscience to drive me here,
and it was for that reason I asked to appear.

I found out that knowing I had been a Communist and having to go
around in my professional life, which is that of a writer for radio and
television, and deliberately delude decent people who wanted to hire
me, by lying to them about that — I simply found out that I could not
continue that any longer and live with myself, so I was literally forced
into this decision by my own conscience. I knew that I was a Com-
munist once, and I was going around and saying I was not and never
had been. I could not do that any more.

The second reason is because of your appeals and the offer to all
those who wanted to come forward and help. I felt if I could con-
tribute in any way to national security by coming down here, I should.

The third thing is my family. I have 2 very, very young boys — 1 is
2^2 years of age and 1 is 4 — and a wonderful wife. I wanted to be a
decent person and bring them up properly, and a father who goes
around lying about himself is not a very decent person. I wanted to
get my story on the record. Thanks to you, it seems I will be able to
do this.

I feel there may be a lot of people like myself who have been some
time in the past involved in this rotten thing and who may be waiting



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (ENTERTAINMENT) 3853

and not knowing what to do about it, and it may be somebody will be
helped by my actions here. I know I have been helped by the privi-
lege of coming here and telling my story.

I understand that Budd Schulberg appeared before you and I felt if
Schulberg could do it, Sloane can also. I feel everyone is obligated
to others. I feel if a person has been used by communism, and if he
can help another person to come forward and tell his story by doing
so himself, he should do so.

Mr. Velde. I want to say to you now that the Communist Party has
been most vicious in trying to prevent people such as you from testi-
fying before our committee and other committees of Congress. A
great deal of the good that has been done in fighting communism has
been done by people such as you who have undergone the trials and
tribulations as you have and who have finally come to realize that it
just isn't in accordance with the American way of life and the way that
you have been brought up. So again I want to say that the committee
certainly does appreciate your coming before it and giving the very
valuable testimony which I know you will give.

Mr. Tavenner. When and where were you born, Mr. Sloane ?

Mr. Sloane. I was born in New York City, June 24, 1914.

Mr. Tavenner. Where do you now reside ?

Mr. Sloane. I now reside at 243 Belltown Koad, Stamford, Conn.

Mr. Tavenner. You have stated that your profession is that of
radio and screen writing?

Mr. Sloane. And some television; yes.

Mr. Tavenner. And television?

Mr. Sloane. Yes, sir.

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee, please, what the nature
of your employment has been and what experience you have had in
your profession, briefly ?

Mr. Sloane. In brief — let me see. The period from 1936 to 1941
I was a newspaperman, reporter, photographer, editor, copy writer
and reader. For the year 1941 I was a soldier — a volunteer. From
1942 to 1943 I was a newspaperman again and since 1943 I have been
in radio. My work has ranged from soap opera to very large and
important solid documentary programs. I have written several films
and most recently have been the author of the picture Martin Luther,
the documentary picture for the Lutheran Church, about their found-
er's life, Martin Luther. I have worked for types of organizations,
such as the United Nations, the Cerebral Palsy Foundation, American
Legion, United States Army, and such organizations. I say proudly
that I am the creator of the very famous slogan "Sound off". Any-
body who has ever heard the kids walking down the streets saying
"Sound off" knows my work.

This should cover the period generally from 1943 to 1947. Since
that time I have worked as a free-lance writer. I would be called
by the radio station and asked to do this project or that project.
They might ask me to do a survey on the conditions of children on
the farm, or on the DP camps, or the international refugee organiza-
tions, and such things for the radio. The following is a record of my
work in radio, television, and films from 1943 to 1953.



42885— 54^-pt. 1-



3854 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (ENTERTAINMENT)

RADIO

1943:

Green Valley, U.S.A CBS

The Man Behind the Gun CBS

1944:

Calling America CBS

Transatlantic Call CBS

Report to the Nation CBS

School of the Air CBS

1945:

Prudential Family Hour CBS

Time to Rememher CBS

Radio Readers' Digest CBS

1946-4S :

Sound Off All networks

Warriors of Peace ABC

The Big Story NBC

1948: Top Secret NBC

1949-52 :

Heroes of Peace U. N.

Citizens of the World U. N.

Note. — The above programs refer to series, i. e., consecutive programs in
sequence. The following one-time shows during this period are also worthy of
mention :

1. 1946 — We Went Back (CBS) : The first all-tape-recorded documentary pro-
gram in radio, 1 hour long, celebrating first anniversary of V-J Day.

2. 1946 — Fifty Years on Wheels (CBS) : A special documentary salute to the
American auto industry.

3. 1945-48 — A series of individual one-time programs for the United Jewish
Appeal, for DP and Israel fund raising, all networks.

4. 1948— Between the Dark and the Daylight (CBS) : A half-hour docu-
mentary about the suffering of children of Europe, featuring tape recordings
made by me in seven countries, for the U. N.

5. 1948 — The Time Is Now (CBS) : A half -hour documentary celebrating the
second General Assembly of the U. N., translated into seven languages and
broadcast all over the world.

6. 1949 — The Hard Core (NBC) : A half-hour tape-recorded documentary
about displaced persons, result of 6 months' duty as radio officer of International
Refugee Organization.

7. 1950 — The Lady in the Harbor (NBC) : A half -hour American Legion pro-
gram setting forth the keynote of the year.

8. 1950 — 11 Memory Street (Mutual) : An hour-long tape-recorded docu-
mentary describing U. N. work in tracing lost children.

Worthy of mention also are innumerable single programs for such organiza-
tions and causes as : Cavalcade ; CBS Is There ; The Land Is Bright ; Labor for
Victory ; Cafe Istanbul ; Great Scenes From Great Plays ; cancer, heart, diabetes,
cerebral palsy, infantile paralysis funds — American Medical Association; Treas-
ury war bond drives, YMCA, YWCA, Visiting Nurse Association.

television

1946 : Tales To Remember CBS experimental program

1950 : NBC

Treasury Men in Action NBC

The Big Story NBC

1951-52 :

Lamp Unto My Feet CBS religious program

American Inventory NBC, Sloan Foundation show

FILM

Answer for Anne : A documentary about DP's, for Lutheran World Federation.
The Two Kingdoms : A documentary about Germany for Lutheran World

Federation.
Turn in the Road : A documentary on worldwide charity for Lutheran churches.
Faith That Works : A religious film for United States Navy.
Martin Luther : Feature biography for combined Lutheran churches.



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (ENTERTAINMENT) 3855

OTHER

1951 — Seeds iu the Wind : A live documentary presentation for the Jewish Board

of Guardians.
1953 — Winning Men's Minds : A live dramatization for the annual meeting of

the American Jewish Committee.
1953— Tomorrow for the Taking: A live dramatization on Christian education

for the Presbyterian General Assembly, May 1953.

Note. — Awards and commendations include "Best Religious Film of 1948"
for Answer for Anne, New York Times listing "10 Best Films of 1953" for Martin
Luther, 4 Peabody awards and 5 Ohio State award citations for various radio
programs.

Mr. Moulder. Were you in the armed services ?

Mr. Sloane. Yes, I was, sir. I volunteered as of January 20, 1941.
I was discharged December 25, 1941, the same year.

Mr. Tavenner. What was the period of time in which you worked
with the United Nations ?

Mr. Sloane. I was first hired by the U. N. — perhaps the specificity
of some of the dates will surprise you, but I have tried to remember
the facts as closely as I could. I was first hired December 13, 1947.
The reason I remember that date is because I went to Europe for
them. I worked for the U. N. consistently between December of 1947
until, let us say, May of 1952, and then I didn't work for them any
more, the reason for this being, in all frankness, that the effort to
keep Communists out of the U. N. was successful in my case because I
could not honestly fill out the form and say I had not been a mem-
ber of the Communist Party, so I couldn't work for the U. N. any
more.

Mr. Tavenner. What are some of the other professional contribu-
tions you have made in your field in the way of writing ?

Mr. Sloane. This is slightly embarrassing — for instance, during
the war I wrote The Man Behind the Gun, which was a dramatiza-
tion of the meaning of our battle and why our men were fighting.
That was a prize program. My next was Transatlantic Call. This
was broadcast from the United States 1 week and Britain the next,
and its purpose was to let both nations understand what each of the
other was doing and why, and bring about a better understanding of
each nation and its problems. I also did some work on a program
called This Is the Navy, which had to do with stories of Navy heroism.
I worked, too, on a program called Green Valley USA, which was based
on directives from the Office of War Information. I would go from
State to State, and city to city, from Portland, Oreg., to Portland,
Maine, to St. Louis, and so on, telling the stories through this pro-
gram of the various war needs — for instance, the need for blood donors,
and so forth. I also worked on many programs for various appeals
like the United Jewish Appeal, various patriotic funds, Catholic
charities, the cerebral palsy people, cancer programs, and so forth. I
wrote the program for a while for The Big Story, about newspaper
work. I worked on the program called Treasury Men in Action, but
I was dropped from the program. I was called upon by an advertis-
ing agency in 1946 to plan a program designed to bring enlistments
up because, you remember, the draft stopped and we had to take our
men by enlistment through recruitment. So it was then that I in-
vented the so-called gimmick Sound Off, which became very popular.

Mr. Tavenner. Will you tell the committee, please, when you first



3856 COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (ENTERTAINMENT)

came under the influence of the Communist Party? What might
be said to be the beginning of a Communist influence upon your life?

Mr. Sloane. It was just after my discharge from the Army. I
should explain in all fairness to you, and also to thank you for not
going into what must have seemed an obvious fact — that I stayed in
the armed services for such a short time. I got a medical discharge.
It was honorable, but a medical discharge. I returned to my home
in Paterson, N. J., and I was somewhat uncomfortable there, so I
came to New York to visit a young friend of mine, Millard Lampell.
He had been a friend of mine since 1936, so since I had known him
for 5 years I felt free to drop in at 40 Horatio Street to see him.
I explained to him that life was uncomfortable in Paterson and that
I wanted to work in New York City. I lived there as his roommate
and obtained work with the Parade magazine, a Marshall Field
publication.

In the months of January and February 1942, and through late
August of that year that was my home — 10 Horatio Street. I worked
in the same room that he did ; I would be writing, and he was also
free lancing — doing writing — and from time to time we would be
talking and he would discuss the fact that I should, as he said,
solidify my political tendencies and join outright with the Com-
munist Party, of which he was a member at that time. I am afraid
that I did not demur strenuously. I just said, "Oh, yes," and "Sure."'
1 didn't say "Yes," definitely, or "No" courageously. Finally, after
several months' prodding, I went with him to a meeting of the Com-
munist Party at the Dome. It was a dancehall on 6th Avenue,
between 9th and 10th Streets, and I joined. He was my sponsor at
the meeting. I took out a party book and signed my name and paid
my dues. I believe I signed the book "Comrade Allan" or "Comrade
Allan Sloane," I am not sure which. And so I became a member
of the Communist Party. As for becoming subject to the Com-
munist Party influence, which is a little different from joining the
party, I don't think I could directly say as to that. For instance,
I went to the College of the City of New York, which is alleged to
be a hotbed of communism, but I honestly never found it so. There
were meetings on the campus and hubbubs — all sorts of exciting things
happening — but this would cover my 15 to 19 years of age and
during that time I just didn't, to the best of my recollection, join
anything which I would consider to be of a political nature. 1 do
remember one time when Mayor LaGuardia, not then mayor, was
running for the office in New York on the Fusion ticket, and I became
excited about that. I worked on newspaper after newspaper through
the years, but I don't remember them as being either rightist or leftist
or anything of that sort — I just worked and did my business as a
writer.

Mr. Tavenner. Then you would attribute your relationship par-
ticularly with Millard Lampell as being the controlling factor in
bringing you into the Communist Party?

Mr. Sloane. I would by all means consider it the controlling factor,
yes. He was the trigger to my perhaps emotional or humanitarian
outlook or attitude. I should like to say, perhaps, a fuzzy-minded
attitude, but liberal in the best sense of the word. A liberal bent
or tendency in myself which would spring, I would say very honestly,
from the period of time in which I found myself.



COMMUNIST METHODS OF INFILTRATION (ENTERTAINMENT) 3857

I was a graduate of City College in New York, which was called
the poor man's college, in the year 1935, and 1 was able to go on with
my education only through a scholarship, and then I had to go out
and get a job at $15 per week as an editor. So my contacts were
mainly sort of between the capitalist and labor type of persons, and
in my mind, I considered myself as labor or as a workingman.

Mr. Moulder. That was a difficult period.

Mr. Sloane. That was very well understated, sir.

Mr. Tavenner. What Communist Party activities did you observe
during the period you were associated with Millard Lampell? I
mean as to his activities.

Mr. Sloane. My observation of his actual strict Communist Party
activities was confined to a very small area. There was the introduc-
tion and sponsorship of me at the meeting in this particular section,
which was called the Village Club. I must say I never saw him at a
meeting again. I went to only several meetings after that, I can't
actually say how many, but they were very few. I know at the time
of our roommateship he was writing book reviews for the New Repub-
lic and New Masses under the name of Mike Landon. I don't know
if this was a Communist Party activity. At that time he belonged
to a great many fronts, but I didn't know about them at the time. Nor
did he suggest or request that I join in work with, or for, these fronts.
I know of my own knowledge in later years his residence on Grove
Street in Greenwich Village was the place of group meetings, called
a study group, where you would come and have explained to you
the "true" or party meaning of the latest historical event. They
would be given assignments from a pamphlet and books to read, and


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