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American Sugar Refining Company, and others : hearings held before the Special Committee to Investigate the American Sugar Refining Company on June 12, 1911-January 16, 1912 online

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people in Colorado bought quite a lot of that stock.

Mr. Malby. Did the American Sugar Refining Co. purchase a
majority of this company's stock ?



86.2 AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING CO.

Mr. MoEEY. Mr. Havemeyer purchased, or I purchased for him, a
large amount; I should say more than a majority.

Mr. Malby. Was that for Mr. Havemeyer personally or for the
American Sugar Refining Co. ?

Mr. MoREY. I did not know.

Mr. Malby. Do you now know ?

Mr. Moeey. No, I do not know what part of it

Mr. Malby. Who has voted that stock since it was purchased by
Mr. Havemeyer?

Mr. MoREY. For a long time the stock owned by the trust was
voted by Mr. Heike and Mr. Donner.

Mr. Malby. Well, tell ine whether they voted this particular stock
as representatives of the American Sugar Refining Co. ? ««^

Mr. MoREY. I do not remember, but I know they had some of it,
and that Mr. Havemeyer personally had some. But I could not tell
you the quantities.

Mr. Malby. Mr. Heike at that time was secretary of the American
Sugar Refining Co. ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malby. And who was the other gentleman that you named ?

Mr. MoREY. Arthur Donner was the treasurer.

Mr. Malby. Arthur Donner was the treasurer ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Both of them were connected with the American Sugar
Refining Co. in that capacity ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malby. And they voted the stock of the Windsor Sugar Co^ ?

Mr. MoRBY. Their holdings, whatever they were.

Mr. Malby. You say it was a majority, if you remember?

Mr. MoREY. Yes; I should think it was.

Mr. Malby. Do you know what that was capitalized for?

Mr. MoREY. I think $600,000.

Mr. Malby. It says here 1750,000. Does that refresh your recol-
lection any?

Mr. Morey. Yes; I think it would be. I had forgotten that.

Mr. Malby. Did you know who the promoters of that sugar com-
pany were, from the beginning ?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Who were they ?

Mr. Morey. Mr. W. D. Hoover, and a man who is dead. I can not
think of his name.

Mr. Malby. Was the stock of the Windsor Sugar Co. secured by the
American Sugar Refining Co. consequently to their acquirement of
the Eaton Co., the Great Western, and the Greeley, or about the
same time?

Mr. Morey. Along about the same time. No ; that was afterwards.

Mr. Malby. You think the Greeley was afterwards ?

Mr. Morey. No ; the Windsor was afterwards. The Loveland was
the first, the Greeley was the second interest, and the Eaton was the-
third.

Mr. Malby. I am not asking you that question.

Mr. Morey. Well.

Mr. Malby. Just wait a moment. I asked you whether the
Wmdsor Sugar Co. was acquired by the American Sugar Refining Co.



AMEEICAN SUGAR EEFINING CO. 863

after it had acquired an interest in the Eaton Co., the Great Western,
and the Greeley ?

Mr. MoREY. I think it was.

Mr. Malby. You think it was after «

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Was it not about March, 1903, that the American
Sugar Eefining Co. obtained an interest in this company?

Mr. Morey. I could not say.

Mr. Malby. Do you know what the motive was on the part of the
promoters in selling out the Windsor Co. ?

Mr. Morey. They were short of funds to complete it, and the first
year's campaign they

Mr. Malby. Do you think that the purchase of the Eaton and the
Great Western and the Greeley hj the American Sugar Refining Co.
had anything to do with it ?

Mr. Morey. That I could not say.

Mr. Malby. Have you any opinion upon that point ?

Mr. Morey. No; I have not.

Mr. Malby. Have you ever had any conversation with anyone
connected with the Windsor Co. indicating that one of the causes
which induced them to sell out was the fact that the American Sugar
Refining Co. was acquiring various other factories located in the
State of Colorado ?

Mr. Morey. It might have had something to do with it.

Mr. Malby. I say, have you heard that ?

Mr. Morey. I do not remember any conversation with anyone in
that particular.

Mr. Malby. The prospect of the Windsor Co. doing business in
that locality after the American Sugar Refining Co. had gone in was
not very bright, was it ?

Mr. Morey. No; the factory was badly located. It was right in
between two other factories, 8 miles from one and 12 miles from
another.

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. Morey. I think they got worried about their location.

Mr. Malby. Did the Windsor Co. ever go into active operation ?

Mr. Morey. Proir to their selling this plant ?

Mr. Malby. At any time.

Mr. Morey. I think they did.

Mr. Malby. Are you sure that they did ?

Mr. Morey. Yes; quite sure.

Mr. Malby. Was it after the stock had been acquired by the
American Sugar Refining Co., or before.

Mr. Morey. After, I think.

Mr. Malby. You think it was operated after 1

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. For what period of time ?

Mr. Morey. Until it was old out to the Great Western Co.

Mr. Malby. And it was sold out to the Great Western Co. in what
year?

Mr. Morey. In 1905.

Mr. Malby. In 1905?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Is it now in operation ?



864 AMERICAN STJGAB BEPINING CO.

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malbt. Is it a paying institution ?

Mr. MoREY. It was not the first year.

Mr. Malby. None of them pay very well the first year, do they ?

Mr. Morey. Not usually; no, sir.

Mr. Malby. This has paid after the first year, has it ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Now, it has proven by its actual operation that it
was fairly well located for business, has it not ?

Mr. Morey. Yes; we have all been surprised that we got as many
beets for those factories, that are so close together, as we have done.

(At 5 o'clock p. m., the committee adjourned until to-morrow,
Saturday, June 24, 1911, at 10 o'clock a. m.)



No. 11



HEARINGS



HELD BEFORE THE



SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON THE INVESTIGATION OF THE
AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING CO. AND OTHERS



SATURDAY, JUNE 24, 1911



HOUSE OF EEPEESENTATIVES



WASHINGTON

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

1911



SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON THE INVESTIGATION OF THE AMERICAN
SUGAR REFINING CO.

House op Representatives.

THOMAS W. HAEDWICK, Chairman.
riNIS J. GAKRETT. GEORGE E. MALBY.

WILLIAM SULZEE. J. W. FORDNEY.

JOHN E. EAKEE. E. H. MADISON.

H. M. JACOWAY, Je. A. 0. HINDS.

II



AMERICAN SUGAE EEFINING 00.



Special Committee on the Investigation
or THE American Sugar Eefining Co. and Others,

House of- Representatives,

June 2/1., 1911.
The committee met at 10 o'clock a. m., Hon. Thomas W. Hard-
wick (chairman) presiding.

TESTIMONY OF CHESTER S. MOEEY— Continued.

Mr. Morey. Mr. Chairman, may I correct a statement regarding
the slicing capacities ? I did not give them exactly right yesterday.

Mr. Malby. They were a little larger than those mentioned in the
schedule here, but I did not call your attention to them because
you stated some of them had increased in capacity, and I supposed
that represented the increase in capacity.

Mr. MoRBY. What is known there as the old Great Western of
Colorado was originally constructed as a 600-ton plant and then en-
larged, making it a 1,200-ton plant, a little later; and the same thing
applies to the Longmont factory, which was originally built as a
600-ton plant, but was so built that the additional machinery could
be put into it.

The Chairman. The first one was the Loveland factory ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes; it was called the Great Western.

The Chairman. Located where ?

Mr. MoREY. At Loveland, and the other one at Longmont. Both
of those plants were originally only 600-ton plants, and enlarged.
Then, afterwards, you asked me what they had been increased to.

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. Morey. I would say that instead of the different amounts I
gave yesterday that every factory we have has been increased-y-not
referring to this doubling up at all, because that was entirely differ-
ent—but we have added more pans and more centrifugals and more
machinery of different kinds, so that the capacity has been increased
from 33J per cent, on every factory we have, up to 50 per cent. It
is hard to tell just what the capacity

Mr. Malby (uiterposing) . I see here that the companies named,
including the Billings and the Scottsbluff, that the aggregate is 9,700
tons. Now, can you tell me about what the aggregate is now ?

Mr. Morey. No. I was goin^ to say, it is hard to tell, because so
much depends on the quality of beets as to what a factory can slice
during a season.

Mr. Malby. Yes, and I do not think it is so very material, anyway.
We have it near enough for all practical purposes.

865



866 AMERICAN STJGAK EEFINING CO.

Mr. MoREY. Yes, I think so.

Mr. Malby. When we closed last evening we were inquiring about
the Windsor Sugar Co. of Colorado. At the risk of repetition, I will
ask you who owns the capital stock of that company at the present
time.
Mr. MoEEY. The Great Western Sugar Co. owns the property.
Mr. Malby. It secured the property by an exchange of stock of the
Great Western Sugar Co. ?

Mr. Moeey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Do you know how much it was capitalized at ?

Mr. MoEEY. At that time ?

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. Moeey. I think it was $750,000.

Mr. Malby. Who is Chester S. Morey ?

Mr. Moeey. That is myseK.

Mr. Malby. Is there such a sugar company as the Longmont Sugar
Co.; that is the one you referred to?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. When was that incorporated?

Mr. Morey. I think early in 1903.

Mr. Malby. The statement here is March, 1902.

Mr. Moeey. 1902 ?

Mr. Malby. Would that be your present recollection, or have you
the absolute date ?

Mr. Moeey. I think that statement there would be correct, but I
am not sure. I have a memorandum here that the Longmont factory
was built during the year 1903, and that the first campaign began in
1903, so I imagine that statement is correct as to the incorporation.

Mr. Malby. That is, it might have been incorporated in March,
1902, and then constructed in 1903 ?

Mr. Moeey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Do you remember the amount of capital stock?

Mr. Moeey. No ; I do not.

Mr. Malby. Have you any means of ascertaining what the capital
stock was ?

Mr. Moeey. I can find out by telegraphing to Denver, of course.

Mr. Malby. Mr. Morey, it is quite important, among other things,
we should know the amount of the original capital stock of all the
companies.

Mr. Moeey. I would be very glad to furnish the exact amount of
all those corporations, but it is hard to remember so many of them.

Mr. Malby. Yes; I appreciate that. I want the capital stock of
each one of the companies which went into the Great Western Sugar
Co., the capitalization prior to their being taken in.

Mr. Moeey. At the time they were organized ?

Mr. Malby. Yes ; or if there was an increase of capital at the time
you took them in, I would like to have that appear in it.

Mr. Moeey. Then you want the capital stock at the time of the
consolidation — at the time the Great Western bought them out ?

Mr. Malby. Yes ; that is one question, and I also want the amount
of Great Western stock issued in exchange for theproperty, whether
that be the same as their capitalization or not. Was the Longmont
Co. operated as an independent sugar company from 1903 up to 1905?
I Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.



AMEEICAN- SUGAR REFINING CO. 867

Mr. Malby. Do you recall who was the president of the company
during that period ?

Mr. MoKET. I think I was.

Mr. Malby. At that time negotiations were had with the Great
Western Sugar Co. by which it was consolidated with the Great West-
ern Sugar Co. ?

Mr. MoEEY. You mean the old Great Western Sugar Co. or the new ?

Mr. Malby. The new, I judge.

Mr. MoEEY. No; nothing of that kind was thought of when that
was built.

Mr. Malby. I say, in 1905 was it consolidated?

Mr. MoREY. Oh, yes. It was bought out by the Great Western.

Mr. Malby. Is the date, 1905, correct?

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Was it engaged in the general sale of sugar in Colorado
and the adjoining States?

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And doing generally an interstate business with refer-
ence to its product — that is, it operated in more than one State ?

Mr. MoEEY. I think so. We sold all our sugar in Colorado. The
sales were all made there.

Mr. Malby. But where were they distributed ?

Mr. MoEEY. Distributed out of the State; yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Your office was in Colorado, but the sales were made
for points outside of Colorado and in different States ?

Mr. MoRBY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Do you recall the Fort Collins Sugar Co. ?

Mr. MoREY. The Fort ColUns (Colo.) Sugar Co. ?

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Was that company incorporated in Colorado ?

Mr. MoREY. I think that is a Colorado corporation; yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And did they erect a beet-sugar factory at Fort
Collins ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. When was it incorporated ? I will give you the date
given here, and see if that agrees with the date you have. It is stated
here as October, 1903. , t^ /-, n-

Mr. MoREY. I have a memorandum here that the Fort Collms
factory was built during the years 1903 and 1904.

Mr. Malby. And it probably was incorporated some time prior to
that, about the latter part of 1902 ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes; I think so.

Mr. Malby. When did it go into operation ?

Mr. MoEEY. Not until January, 1904.

Mr. Malby. Who was the president of that company ?

Mr. MoREY. I think B. B. Hottel was president of that company.

Mr. Malby. Where does he live ?

Mr. MoREY. At Fort Collins.

Mr. Malby. Does he live there now ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir. . . i ;. . ,

Mr. Malby. What was the capacity of that factory '.

Mr.' MoREY. One thousand two hundred tons, I think.

Mr! Malby. Do you remember what its capitahzation was ?



868 AMBBICAN SUGAR REFINING CO.

Mr. MoREY. No; I do not.

Mr. Malby. That will be included in the other statement ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes.

Mr. Malby. It was engaged in the manufacture of sugar independ-
ent of all other corporations, during that year ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And up to 1905 ?

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Was the property then acquired by the Great Western
Co.?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. And is held and owned by the Great Western Sugar
Co. at the present time 1

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And operated by it ?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mi. Malby. Either at the time of its incorporation or thereafter,
of the two companies named, to wit, the Longmont Sugar Co. and
the Fort Collins (Colo.) Sugar Co., did the American Sugar Co. own
any stock in either or both of those concerns ?

Mr. Morey. I think they did own a large amount of stock. It
could not have been built without them.

Mr. Malby. Were they in it at the beginning ?

Mr. Morey. I do not know about the Fort Collins (Colo.) Sugar
Co., because I was not one of the organizers. They were in at the be-
ginning of the Longmont Co.; I know that.

Mr. Malby. Did they own a majority of the stock in the Longmont
Co.?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. And continued to own it up to the time it was acquired
by the Great Western Sugar Co. ?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And received their pro rata share of stock in return
at the time of the consolidation ?

Mr. Morey. Yes. In saying that I mean either Mr. Havemeyer or
the American Sugar Refining Co., I do not know which.

Mr. Malby. Either one or the other ?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Either Mr. H. O. Havemeyer or the American Sugar
Refining Co. ?

Mr. Morey. That is right. They could not have been built if they
had not furnished the money.

Mr. Malby. They furnished the money for both of these plants,
did they not ?

Mr. Morey. They furnished the most of it. The Fort Collins
Co. was in trouble of some kind. I am not familiar with that because
I was not connected with it at that time. But they were the original
subscribers for the Longmont factory, and caused it to be built, and
the same applies to the Windsor, which you asked me about last
night. They furnished the money to build it. It could not have
been built without them.

Mr. Malby. Can you give me the relations which existed between
the Fort ColUns Co. and the American Sugar Refiining Co. or Mr.
H. O. Havemeyer?



AMERICAN SUGAB REFINING CO. 869

Mr. MoRBT. No; I could not.

Mr. Malby. Do you know whether they owned any of the stock
of that company prior to its being acquired by the Great Western
Sugar Co. ?

Mr. MoBEY. I am quite sure they did; yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. You think they did ?

Mr. MoBEY. I do.

Mr. Malby. Is there any way you can ascertain exactly how much
they did own ?

Mr. MoREY. Well, I wiU try. I do not think we have the minutes of
the old Fort Collins Co. They incorporated, if I remember correctly,
two or three different times, and the reason of the Fort Colhns (Colo.)
Co. was because they had first incorporated as the Fort Colhns Sugar
Co., and then they put in the word "Beet" in one company, and I
do not remember about that, because I was not interested; and
whether we have the minute books before we took hold of it, I could
not teU.

Mr. Malby. If there is any way you can inform the committee
as to whether either Mr. H. O. Havemeyer or the American Sugar
Refining Co. at any time owned any of the stock in the Fort Comns
(Colo.) Sugar Co., or now own any of the stock, or became the owpier
by the surrender of that stock to the Great Western Sugar Co., I wish
you would let the committee know about that.

Mr. MoREY. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Now, the Fort Colhns Co., like the Longmont Co., was
engaged in the manufacture of sugar, and doing an interstate trade
prior to its being acquired by the Great Western Sugar Co., for a
certain period of time ?

Mr. MoREY. I do not think they ever did any business. I do not
think they sold any of their sugar. They did not make but very
httle. The beets nearly all rotted up there because the factory was
so late in getting in operation.

Mr. Malby. Where is Longmont located with reference to the
State ? In what portion of the State is it ?

Mr. MoREY. It is in the northwestern part of the State, about 36
miles nortwest of Denver.

Mr. Malby. Is there any other sugar company located in that
locality ?

Mr. Mobey. Yes ; we have six factories all within a 30-mile radius.

Mr. Malby. Is that portion of the State regarded as specially
adapted to the growth of sugar beets ?

Mr. Mobey. Is has been proved that it is a very fertile part of
Colorado, and pretty well watered.

Mr. Malby. And is well adapted in every way to the raising of
beets ?

Mr. Mobey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Do you know whether or not any persons or corpora-
tions contemplated the construction of a plant there at the time of
the construction of the Longmont Co. ?

Mr. Mobey. They were trying to raise capital to build a plant.

Mr. Malby. Who was trying to do that ?

Mr. Mobey. Three or four different parties. I do not remem^apr
their names, but it was so reported.



870 AMEKICAN SUGAR BBPINING CO.

Mr. Malby. Did they actually proceed to the construction of a
plant ?

Mr. MoEET. The outside parties, you mean ?

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. Moeey. No; they did not get as far as to secure even the
capital to incorporate.

Mr. Malby. The Fort Collins (Colo.) Sugar Co. is- located in about
that same locality, is it not ?

Mr. Morey. About 36 miles farther north, directly north.

Mi. Malby. But it has the same opportunities, the same fertility
of soil, and so forth, for the growing of sugar beets ?

Mr. MoKEY. Yes; it is similar all through there.

Mr. Malby. Now, prior to the construction of that company, did
you hear of anybody who was talking of putting in a beet-sugar
factory there ?

Mr. Morey. I heard talk about it. Rumors were pretty thick
about the beet-sugar business in those years. They were falling over
each other to get locations, and every town that had 300 people
wanted a sugar factory, and all of them were circulating petitions for
acreage and generally trying to get a factory at their particular town;
eiverybody was fighting to get a factory.

Mr. Malby. Was there anything out of the ordinary with reference
to the efforts of anyone to locate a factory at Fort Collins ?

Mr. Morey. I do not know of anything, I am sure.-

Mr. Malby. Do you know of any one making special efforts to
construct one at that point ?

Mr. Morey. I do not know of it at all. I have heard rumors.

Mr. Malby. None was erected after the construction of this one.

Mr. Morey. No.

Mr. Malby. Now, taking up the Great Western Sugar Co., that was
incorporated, I think you said, in January, 1905?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Who was the leading spirit or the moving spirit in its
incorpbration ?

Mr. Morey. You mean as to the iacorporation papers, or the
directors and the men who managed it ?

Mr. Malby. Yes; I mean the men who got together and deter-
mined about it. Who were they ?

Mr. Morey. I think my attorney was the first man to suggest it —
Mr. C. W. Waterman.

Mr. Malby. There was a company already existing, called the
Great Western Sugar Co., was there not ?
- Mr. Morey. There was the Great Western Sugar Co. of Colorado.

Mr. Malby. What were your relations with that company at that
time?

Mr. Morey. With the old Great Western ?

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. Morey. I was a stockholder. I rather think I was a director,
too.

Mr. Malby. Who was that got together and assembled these vari-
ous plants ? Whose scheme was it ?

Mr. Morey. I say, I think Mr. Waterman and myself were the first
to ever consider and recommend that this be done.

Mr. Malby. Whom did you call into consultation?



AMEEICAN SUGAR REFINING CO. 871

Mr. MoRET. Mr. Charles Boettcher, one of our present directors and
vice president.

Mr. Malby. And what interest did he have in the sugar business
prior to that time ?

Mr. MoREY. He was one of the original builders of the Grand Junc-
tion factory and also the Loveland factory.

Mr. Malby. Was he interested in either one or both of those facto-
ries at that time ?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir; he was largely interested.

Mr. Malby. Do you know what position he held with respect to
them?

Mr. MoRBY. He was president of the old Great Western Co., I
think. I am not sure. Perhaps Mr. Champion was president.
Mr. Boettcher was an officer of the company.

Mr. Malby. Is he still living 1

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. Where does he hve ?

Mr. Morey. In Denver.

Mr. Malby. Who else was consulted with reference to it ?

Mr. Morey. M. D. Thatcher, of Pueblo.

Mr. Malby. What company, if any, was he then connected with ?

Mr. Morey. He had stock in nearly all of them, I think. He went
in with me in nearly everything.

Mr. Malby. You think he held stock in nearly all the six com-
panies that originally went in ?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And did you also have stock in most of those com-
panies?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir; all of them.

Mr. Malby. Was he president of any one of the companies or a
director, if you recall ?

Mr. Morey. Mr. Thatcher ?

Mr. Malby. Mr. Boettcher.

Mr. Morey. Mr. Boettcher was president of the old Great Western
of Colorado; but I thought you were asking me about Mr. Thatcher.

Mr. Malby. Yes; I mtended to ask you about the one you named
last.

Mr. Morey. I think Mr. Thatcher was treasurer of some of those

cornpanies.

Mr. Malby. Do you know which one ?

Mr. Morey. No; I do not remember; but he is our present treas-
urer — treasurer of the present Great Western Sugar Co.

Mr. Malby. And also a stockholder, I presume ?

Mr. Morey. A large stockholder; very large.

Mr. Malby. Now, who else of the group of six companies were
consulted ?

Mr. Morey. Mr. C. A. Granger.

Mr. Malby. Who was Mr. Granger? , ^ , ^ ^ .i, « .

Mr Morey. He was the manager of the Greeley factory; the ftrst
man who got me to invest in the sugar business. He is now dead.

Mr. Malby. Who was president of the Greeley factory at that time i

Mr! Morey. I think I was.

Mr. Malby. Who else was consulted ?



872 AMERICAN SUGAR REFINING CO.

Mr. MoREY. After we had discussed it in Colorado, I took it up
then with Mr. Havemeyer in New York.

Mr. Malby. Before we get to that, I will ask you who represented
the Eaton Co. ?

Mr. Morey. At the time of the consolidation ?

Mr. Malby. Yes.

Mr. Morey. I think I did. I think I was president.

Mr. Malby. Were any of the stockholders in the Eaton Co., or
any of the directors, consulted about the organization ?

Mr. Morey. I think they were.

Mr. Malby. At any rate it was satisfactory to the directors and the
stockholders of the Eaton Co. ?

Mr. Morey. Yes, sir.

Mr. Malby. And the same with the Greeley Co. ?

Mr. Morey. Yes.

Mr. Malby. Now, the Longmont Co.; who was president of that
company at that time ?

Mr. Morey. I think I was.



Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. House. Special CommitteeAmerican Sugar Refining Company, and others : hearings held before the Special Committee to Investigate the American Sugar Refining Company on June 12, 1911-January 16, 1912 → online text (page 11 of 74)