Copyright
United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) online

. (page 2 of 38)
Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Select CommitteeInvestigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) → online text (page 2 of 38)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


that week. In other words, the equivalent high overtime.^

We have an example here, for instance, in the year 1957, Mr. Cozza
was paid for 364 regular shifts, 14 extra shifts, 28 vacation shifts, and
3 holiday shifts. In other w^ords, he was paid for a sliift at least
every day, and sometimes two shifts.

Mr. Kennedy. That was more than anybody else received as a
truckdri ver, or subtruckdriver for the newspapers ?

Mr. Salinger. That is the most shifts worked by anybody that year.

The Chairman. How much did it result in ?

Mr. Salinger. Three hmidred and sixty- four regular shifts, 14 extra
shifts, 29 vacation shifts, and 3 holiday shifts.

Senator Goldwater. How much in money ?

Mr. Salinger. The total paid to Mr. Cozza in the year 1957
amounted to $8,858.63.

Now, that is his pay, and he had another situation wliich added
money to that.

Senator Goldwater. What is the hourly rate on the contract?

Mr. Salinger. I would have to check that, and I am not exactly sure
of it.

Mr. Kennedy. Perhaps you could tell us.

Mr. PocH. Wliat period was that ?

The Chairman. 1957.

Mr. PocH. I would say in the neighborhood of $2.50 an hour, give
or take, sometliing like that.

Senator Goldwater. What was the average pay of the other truck-
drivers ?

Mr. Salinger. Well, the pay of the regular drivers ran anywhere
from $7,000 up to $8,500, in that neighborhood. Mr. Cozza hap-
pened to be the highest that year.

Mr. Kennedy. Under the way they were determining it, it couldn't
be an3'thing but the highest, because each week he got the equivalent of
whoever received the highest pay.

Mr. Salinger. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Then he also rented his truck to the newspaper: is
that right?

Mr. Salinger. That is correct. From 1953 on, the Sun Telegraph
instituted a system of each driver for the paper would own their own



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18795

truck, and they rented the trucks to the paper, and Mr. Cozza rented
his truck ahhou^h he did not drive it and it was driven by a substitute
tnickdriver.

Mr. Kennei>y. How much did lie receive for that ?

Mr. Salinger. The total salary received by Mr. Cozza in the period
January 1, 1950, to May 15, 1959, was $75,925.05. In addition to that
he received in truck rentals $24,279.27, a total figure of a little over
$100,000.

Senator Goldwatee. What was the period ?

Mr. Salincer. January 1, 1950, to May 15, 1959 for the salary, and
for the truck it runs from approximately the middle of 1953 to 1959.

TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM J. PCCH, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
J. WRAY CONNOLLY— Resumed

Mr. Kennedy. He also received office space; is that correct?

Mr. PocH. Yes.

The Chairman. Do I understand that this $75,925 was paid for
actually no service rendered other than for labor peace?

Mr. PocH. Senator McClellan, I would say that is not entirely cor-
rect.

The Chairman. Get it exactly correct for us, if you can.

Mr. PocH. Mr. Cozza did a little work for us, but to what extent I
cannot answer that, and to what degree or terms of minutes or hours or
days, I cannot give you the answer. I don't know.

The Chairman. Did he earn by actual labor 10 percent of this
amount ?

]Mr. PocH. I couldn't answer that, sir.

The Chairman. Did he earn 5 percent?

Mr. Posh. Senator McClellan, I wouldn't know, because I am not
close to that operation.

The Chairman. Well, as a business manager of an institution like
that, it seems to me that you would have some responsibility and some
interest and curiosity in finding out whether a man was earning the
salary on the basis of the contract relationship and conditions.

Just to make it plain, if I am in error now, say so, but the truth
about it is that this was being paid for labor peace primarily, and not
for any labor services actually rendered ; is that correct ?

Mr. PocH. I don't say that the payments were not made as such,
to my knowledge.

The Chairman. What is that ?

Mr. Poch. Were not made as such, according to my knowledge.

The Chairman. Not made for services?

Mr. Poch. For labor peace, not to my knowledge.

The Chairman. It was not made for it. What was it paid for?
He did very little work, you said, to your knowledge,

Mr. Poch. That is riglit.

The Chairman. What is the difference now? What was it paid
for beyond the little work? Now, what involved all of the major
expenditures, and what was it paid for ?

Mr. Pocii. Well, Senator, as I said before, that practice was in
existence when I came there, and liow much earlier it started I don't
recall. It is something that I ran into later on, and to what degree or



18796 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

to what extent there Mr. Cozza performed services I am in no posi-
tion to answer that, because I don't know. But my best opinion, it
was very little services.

The Chairman. You have said that — very little services, for which
wages should be paid under the terms of the contract ; is that correct ?

In other words, if you are going to actually pay him on the wage
rate for the amount of actual labor performed, it would be very little.

Mr. PocH. It would be substantially less than what was paid.

The CHAiRMAisr. Now then, what made up the difference of the sub-
stantial amount? What was that substantial difference paid for?

Mr. PocH. I would say it was continued for fear of disturbing our
labor relations and labor peace.

The Chairman. That is for labor peace, isn't it ?

Mr. PocH. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. What other term could you use to better describe
it than "labor peace" ? Can you think of a better term ?

Mr. PocH. I know of none offhand, Senator.

The Chairman. I can't either. I don't see any reason why not to
be frank about it. You didn't want another strike, and you wanted
to get along with them, and this was an exaction made as president
of that union, and he said, "Well, I want so and so," and you didn't
just go out and gratuitously hand this to him, did you ?

Mr. PocH. No, sir.

The Chairman. So he said he wanted it, and that was a demand
that was a part of the conditions by which you could have labor peace;
is that not correct ?

Mr. PocH. Yes, but it was not a demand made upon me as such.

The Chairman. Not upon you. I understand you occupy a posi-
tion as business manager.

Mr. Poch. Yes, I do.

The Chairman. As business manager, these things are bound to
come to your attention, so you know what money is paid out for, and
why it is paid out. Doesn't that come within the category of a busi-
ness manager?

Mr. Poch. Yes, it does.

The Chairman. Within your responsibility ?

Mr. Poch. Yes.

The Chairman. And you are testifying on the basis of your obser-
vation and what you have learned in that capacity ?

Mr. Poch. Yes ; that is correct.

The Chairman. All right, proceed.

TESTIMONY OP PIEHRE E. G. SALINGEE— Eesumed

Mr. KJENNEDT. Now, Mr. Salinger, he had that office, and he oper-
ated out of the office ?

Mr. Salinger. He had an office, and he had a telephone.

Mr. Kennedy. There were complaints during this period of time,
according to the records of the paper, that he was using the office to
operate a numbers racket ?

]\T7-. S A T jNGKH. Tha



Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Select CommitteeInvestigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) → online text (page 2 of 38)