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United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) online

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The Chairman. I hand you a check dated May 5, 1950, made to
Banner Merchantile & Supply Co.

Mr. Cohen. I can't hear you.

The Chairman. I have a check made payable to Banner Mercantile
& Supply Corp., $25,000. I am not sure that I can tell by whom it is
signed or issued.

Will you examine the check and identify it ?

Mr. Cohen. That is my check.

The Chairman. All right, it may be made exhibit No. 21. (Check
referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 21" for reference and will be
found in the appendix on p. 19131.)

Mr. Kennedy. Was that an investment on your part in that com-
pany?

Mr. Cohen. That was correct.



19014 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. What was Mr. Benjamin Dranow putting in the
company ?

Mr. Cohen. He wasn't going to put any money, and he was going to
put his son in there to manufacture.

Mr. Kennedy. There were going to be these cuff links and the
shirts with Teamsters local so-an-so on them ?

Mr. Cohen. Any item that he felt he could possibly manufacture.

Mr. Kennedy. Cuff links with the Teamster emblem on them?

Mr. Cohen. I never saw the items.

The Chairman. You made an investment of $25,000 without know-
ing exactly what they were going to do ?

Mr. Cohen. Well, he told me what he had in mind to do, and when
I found he wasn't filling anything out and was just using the account,
I told him the whole thing was over and I closed the whole business
and dissolved it and finished it up and told him to charge the whole
$25,000 against his account on the purchase of the stock. I saw no
billing going out, but only checks going out.

The Chairman. So this $25,000 actually amounts to part of the
purchase price of the stock ?

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. After you made the investment and found he wasn't
doing anything

Mr. Cohen. He might have been doing something but he wasn't
billing anything out.

Mr. Kennedy. Then you applied that to the purchase ?

Mr. Cohen. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. As you understood it, were there cigarette lighters
with Teamster emblems on them ?

Mr. Cohen. He mentioned many items, but actually I didn't see any.

Mr. Kennedy. Ladies bracelets with Teamstei-s emblems?

Mr. Cohen. I didn't see them.

Mr. Kennedy. Was that one of the things mentioned ?

Mr. Cohen. He mentioned a long series of items. I am sure the
items you mentioned are correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Matching cuff link and tie bar ?

Mr. Reed. Mr. Kennedy, he already answered that he didn't see
any of them and he assumes what you are saying is so.

Mr. Kennedy. I am asking if these were mentioned.

Mr. Cohen. Maybe not individually, but he said there would be a
series of items that he was goin^ to try to manufacture.

Mr. Kennedy. All right. Did you invest any money other than
$25,000 in this company ?

Mr. Cohen. In Banner?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes.

Mr. Cohen. The records indicate exactly what was invested. You
have all the records.

(The witness conferred with his counsel.)

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Bellino, how much does it show there was
invested ?

Mr. Belling. Total deposits of around $38,000.

Mr. Cohen. Whatever the records indicate. They are not all my
moneys. Some moneys he deposited on his own. I don't know where
they came from.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19015

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know what he did with the money ?

Mr. Cohen. I have no idea, except w^ien the vouchers came back
from the bank. There was just a name there. That is all.

Mr. Kennedy. The money went into this company and then he took
it out ; is that right ?

Mr, Cohen. Apparently he did.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ask him what he did with the money ?

Mr. Cohen. I have no idea what he did.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever ask him what he did with it?

Mr. Cohen. AVhen I asked him why we weren't billing anything
out as originally planned, he said it would take time until he gets it
established, may take as much as a year or two. When he told me
that, I said, "Well, I want no part of it. I would rather get out
of it."

Senator Goldwater. Can I get something squared away ?

Mr. Kennedy. Can I get these checks in ?

Senator Goldwater. Is this amount we are talking about now
included in the total of $56,000 that this gentleman loaned Mr.
Dranow ?

Mr. Belling. $25,000 is included.

Senator Goldwater. That is included. He just mentioned a total
of 38 or

Mr. Bellino. $35,163 was the total deposits, between the $25,000
and $10,000 with other funds that Dranow put in there.

Senator Goldwater. The $25,000 is part of the $56,000?

Mr. Belling. That is right.

Senator Ggldw^ater. And also part of the $35,000 ?

Mr. Belling. Yes.

The Chairman. Did you put any money in there besides the
$25,000?

Mr. Cohen. I might have, and, if so, the record would indicate that.

Mr. Kennedy. How much does it show ?

Mr. Belling. The records don't show.

Mr. Kennedy. What do the records show, Mr. Bellino?

Mr. Bellino. The records show the total deposits were $51,432.20,
of which some $35,000 came out and went to Dranow.

Mr. Kennedy. Do the records show how much he invevSted in the
company in total ?

Mr. Belling. We could identify only $30,000, $25,000, and $5,000.

Mr. Cohen, \^^latever the records show.

Mr. Belling. Do you know where the $7,000 came from ?

Mr. Reed. I beg your pardon ?

Mr. Belling. The $7,000?

Mr. Cohen. No. Whatever we gave him our records indicate.
Anything else I don't know where it came from.

Mr. Kennedy. Could we identify these checks, Mr. Chairman ? We
can put them in in bulk.

The Chairman. Mr. Bellino, you have before you a number of
photostatic copies of checks. What do they represent?

Mr. Belling. They are checks which were payable to Ben Dranow.

The Chairman. From whom ?

Mr. Belling. From Banner Mercantile & Supply and Town &
Travel Casuals, principally, to Ben Dranow.



19016 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

The Chairman. They may be made exhibit No. 22 in bulk.

(Checks referred to were marked "exhibit No. 22" for reference,
and may be found in the files of the select committee.)

The Chairman. How many are there. Let the record show how
many there are.

Mr. Bellino. There are 13 or 14.

The Chairman. Is there anything further ?

Thank you ver;y^ much.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Sol Marks.

The Chairman. Mr. Marks, come forward, please.

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth-
ing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Marks. I do.

TESTIMONY OF SOL MARKS, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
J. M. SCHIFFER

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your
busines or occupation.

Mr. Marks. Sol Marks, 300 Central Park West; manufacturing
jobber.

The Chairman. Thank you. You have counsel present.

Mr. Counsel, identify yourself for the record.

Mr. ScHiFFER. J. M. Schiffer, 32 Broadway, New York.

The Chairman. Proceed.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Marks, what is your business?

Mr. Marks. Manufacturer and jobbers of emblems and novelties.

Mr. Kennedy. Were you approached in 1958 in connection with
making some emblems for the teamsters ?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. By whom were you approached?

Mr. Marks. By Svirsky.

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat did he want you to do ?

Mr. Marks. To make a sample of an emblem suitable for a jacket.

Mr. Kennedy. A sample of an emblem?

Mr. Marks. Of an emblem.

Mr. Kennedy. What was to be on the emblem ?

Mr. Marks. The Teamster emblem proper.

Mr. Kennedy. Is the emblem that you finally manufactured, the
one that we have on the jacket ? Is that the emblem ?

Mr. Marks. It could be.

The Chairman. Would you recognize it with a little closer in-
spection, possibly ?

Mr. Marks. Well, a few people made the emblem. Senator.

The Chairman. I beg your pardon?

Mr. Marks. A few people made the emblem.

The Chairman. You didn't design the emblem?

Mr. Marks. No. We had a drawing.

The Chairman. You had a drawing of it and you simply manu-
factured the emblem to go on the jacket; is that correct?

Mr. Marks. That is right.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19017

Mr. Kennedy. Who made the emblem?

Mr. Marks. Who made the emblem ?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes.

Mr. Marks. The actual manufacturer of the emblem ?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes.

Mr. Marks. Hartmann Manufacturing Co.

Mr. Kennedy. Where are they located ?

Mr. Marks. Garfield, N.J.

Mr. Kennedy. Anybody else?

Mr. Marks. I don't think so.

Mr. Kennedy. You made the emblems, then, for the jackets?

Mr. Marks. That is right, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. How many emblems did you make ?

Mr. Marks. I would say, roughly, about 12,000.

Mr. Kennedy. How much were you paid for them ?

Mr. Marks. The price varied. Between 30 and 50 cents — varying
prices.

Mr. Kennedy. Is that how much you charged ?

Mr. Marks. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. Weren't they all the same, the emblems?

Mr. Marks. I think they were 50 cents, the actual price.

Mr. Kennedy. How much did they actually cost you to make?

Mr. Marks. There, again, is a variance of price based on the quan-
tities made. Smaller ones cost more, bigger quantities cost less.

Mr. Kennedy. How much did these emblems cost ?

Mr. Marks. 22 to 25 cents apiece.

Mr. Kennedy. And you sold them for approximately 50 cents?

Mr. Marks. 50 cents ; yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently, did you get together with Mr. Sey-
mour Svirsky and form your own company?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. What was the purpose of that?

The name of the company was Union Local Supply Co. ?

Mr. Marks. That is right, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. What was the purpose of that ?

Mr. Marks. Svirsky had gone out of business.

Mr. Kennedy. They had gotten into financial difficulties, had they?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir. And we felt it would be a good spot for us
to stay in business — making jackets, emblems, et cetera.

Mr. Kennedy. So you formed your own company ?

Mr. Ma.rks. That is right, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Was anybody else in it besides you and Seymour
Svirsky ?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Who else?

Mr. Marks. Larry Goldstein.

Mr. Kennedy. How much money did you invest in this company ?

Mr. Marks. Actually, nothing. As we purchased the merchandise,
we paid our bills and it became the investment. But there was no
investment.

Mr. Kennedy. What was this company going to do — just manu-
facture jackets?

Mr. Marks. Manufacture jacket.



19018 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. Did you have a conversation about how many
jackets you were to make?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you talk to Dranow ?

Mr, Marks. Several times.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you understand how many jackets were to be
involved ?

Mr. Marks. Did I understand ?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes.

Mr. Marks. Not from conversation,

Mr. Kennedy. How many jackets did you understand were going
to be ordered ?

Mr. JNIarks, I had no understanding from anybody. I thought
everybody could use a jacket.

Mr. Kennedy. Everybody in the Teamsters Union?

Mr. Marks, I think so.

Mr, Kennedy, Did you understand that they might purchase that
many jacekts?

Mr, Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy, Did you have any conversations along those lines
from Mr. Dranow ?

Mr. Marks. Never, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did any of you invest any money in the company ?

Mr. Marks. Subsequently, now. We are at a loss now in the com-
pany because some moneys are due us,

Mr. Kennedy. Initially did you invest any money in the company ?

Mr. Marks. Just the paying of the bills, which were paid im-
mediately.

Mr. Kennedy. Did anybody receive any money out of the com-
pany?

Mr. Marks. Out of the company ?

Mr. Kennedy, Yes, Did you receive salaries ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr, Kennedy. Did you hire anyone to do the selling for you?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Whom did you hire ?

Mr. Marks, Nat Gordon ?

Mr. Kennedy. Nat Gordon ?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir,

Mr. Kennedy. How did you happen to hire Nat Gordon?

Mr. Marks. He approached us.

Mr. Kennedy. He was hired as a salesman ?

Mr. Marks. That is right, sir,

Mr. Kennedy. How much did you pay him?

Mr. Marks. $200 a week.

Mr. Kennedy, What had been his experience prior to that time?

Mr. Marks. He told me he was familiar with union people and
that he sold industrials and that he could sell merchandise for us.

Mr. Kennedy. Wliom had he worked for prior to that time ?

Mr. Marks. TVTio he worked for ?

Mr. Kennedy, Yes,

Mr. Marks. I don't know who he worked for, but I know he had
some experience in the liquor business with unions.

Mr, Kennedy. "What were his references ?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19019

Mr. Marks. I didn't check them.

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't check that ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kj-:nnedy. Do you know of any job he had prior to tlie time he
came to work for you 'i

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know he had appeared here as a witness ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. That he was an important witness in our Teamsters
case?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. That he was a good friend of Johnny Dioguardi?

Mr. Marks. I have no idea.

Mr. Schiffer. Once again, Mr. Chairman, your chief counsel in-
sists upon putting into tiie record something he personally knows to
be an untruth. This happened 2 years ago and he is doing it again
today.

The Chairman. Just a minute.

If you want to remain here now as counsel for your client, you show
proper respect.

Mr. Schiffer. Mr. Chairman, I just want to register that objection.

The Cftairman. You can register your objections without that kind
of hmguage.

Mr. Kennedy. I might say Mr. Nat Gordon is going to be a witness
and he can clear the record if what I say is incorrect, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Schiffer. Mr. Chairman, we insist procedurally we have a right
to correct the record at the time the chief counsel deliberately misrep-
resents a fact, and we so take advantage of that right, very respect-
fully, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. You will keep it respectful, I will assure you of
rhat. Make no mistake of it. What is the point at issue?

Mr. Kennedy. The point, Mr. Chairman, is that Mr. Nat Gordon
vva-s one of those involved in the paper local case.

Did you know that?

Mr. Marks. Not the slightest idea.

Mr. Kennedy. That he was an associate of Mr. Johnny Dio-
guardi's. Did you know that ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Ml-. Kennedy. And that he appeared here as a witness before this
committee ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know he was a brother of Abe Gordon ?

Mr. Marks. Subsequently I found that out.

Mr. Kennedy. You did not know at the time ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know Mr. Abe Gordon was an officer of
Local 805 of the Teamsters ?

Mr. Marks. Not at the time.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you learn that subsequently ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Nobody ever told you tliat he was a witness down
here?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.



19020 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. What did you know about Mr. Nat Gordon's back-
ground ?

Mr. Marks. Not a thing.

Mr. Kj:nnedy. Do you know anything about Mr. Abe Gordon, his
brother ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. ICennedy. I don't understand that. Somebody just comes off
the street. The company is not doing very well ; nobody is getting a
salary. They haven't any background or experience, and you iiire
them as $200-a-week salesmen.

Mr. Marks. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. Who did he say he knew ?

Mr. Marks. He said he had contacts in the miions and could sell.

Mr. Kennedy. Who were his contacts ?

Mr. Marks. I don't know.

Mr. Kennedy. You just don't put somebody on at $200 a week.

Mr. Marks. We didn't keep him on. We let him go.

Mr. ICennedy. Anybody could have walked into your company
and gotten paid $200 a week ?

Mr. Marks. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. Anybody ?

Mr. Marks. If I felt I wanted to put him on, because I felt he could
produce, sure I would.

Mr. Kennedy. You didn't know anything about his background.
Had he produced anything in this field before ?

Mr. Marks. I haven't the slightest idea. In fact, he didn't produce
anything for me. That is why we terminated the agreement.

Mr. Kennedy. The only thing you Imew about him was that he had
been in the liquor business ?

Mr. Marks. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. When he said that he was experienced with unions,
witli whom did he say he was experienced ?

Mr. Marks. 1 have no recollection of names, but he had friends and
knew people that he could sell.

Mr. Kennedy. Did he tell you about his relationship with Johnny
Dioguardi ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. I^NNEDY. He did not. He didn't mention his name at all to
you?

Mr. Marks. I don't even know the name, friend.

Mr. Kennedy. How many jackets did this company ultimately
make?

Mr. Marks. Well, we had — I wouldn't know. I know we had one
pretty good order. The rest were small, insignificant orders.

Mr. Kennedy. From what local ?

Mr. Marks. From 299, we had 1,000 men's and 1,000 ladies' jackets.

Mr. Kennedy. Some 2,000 jackets?

Mr. IVLvRKS. That is right, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Would you identify this invoice.

The Chairman. The Chair presents to you what purports to be a
photostatic copv on an invoice dated January 2, 1959, made out to
Truck Drivers Local Union 299. It appears to be in the amount of
$27,500. Would you examine that invoice and state if you recognize
it?



IMPROPER ACTIVmES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19021

(The document was handed to the witness.)

(The witness conferred with his counsel.)

Mr. Marks. That is ours.

The Chairman. Thank you very much.

Mr. Kennedy. Had you made 2,000 jackets for local 299 ?

Mr. Marks. Yes, sir.

Mr.KENNEDY. Who was making the jackets for you ?

Mr. Marks. Grand Sportswear.

Mr. Kennedy. Anybody else making the jackets for you?

Mr. ]Marks. For us ? No, sir.

The Chairman. That invoice may be made exhibit No. 23.

(Invoice referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 23" for reference and
will be found in the appendix on p. 19132.)

Mr. Kennedy. Who made the arrangements for you to get that con-
tract from local 299, for these 2,000 ?

Mr. M^\RKS. Who made the arrangements ?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes, sir.

Mr. Marks. We had sent out a flyer and subsequently we got smaU
orders, and Chuck O'Brien, of 299

Mr. Kennedy. He is an official of local 299 ?

Mr. Marks. Yes. sir

Mr. Kennedy. Did he get in touch with you ?

Mr. IVIarks. I think he is an official over there.

Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. What conversation did you have with him?

Mr. Marks. That he wanted the jackets and we made them. The
first time we made one prior to that and then we made this 1,000 of
each.

Mr. Kennedy. Was it explained to you that if you put Nat Gordon
on the payroll that you would receive some contracts for thousands
of these jackets?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever discuss with anybody the fact that
you would be making jackets for several hundreds of thousands of
teamsters ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever indicate or signify to anybody that
you were going to obtain the contract for hundreds of thousands of
these ?

Mr. Marks. Never, sir.

The Chairman. When was Nat Gordon employed ? About what
time ?

Mr. Schiffer. The books will indicate that. We have the books
here.

The Chairman. About what time did you employ him? Do you
remember ?

Mr. Marks. I wouldn't remember. It was a month or 6 weeks, the
entire employment period.

The Chairman. Last year sometime ?

Mv. Marks. No ; this year.

The Chairman. This year?

Mr. Marks. This year ; yes.

The Chairman. Did you know him before you employed him ?



19022 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr, Marks. Never met him.

The Chairman. Had never met him ?

Mr. Marks. Never met him.

The Chairman. Did he bring any references to yon ^

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

Tlfe Chairman. You asked for none?

Mr. Marks. That is right, sir.

The Chairman. He just told you he had connections with the
union?

Mr. Marks. Contacts and connections that he would call upon.

The Chairman. Contacts or connections. Which do you want to
call it?

Mr. Marks. I wouldn't know what word to use except that he knew
people, I suppose.

The Chairman. I didn't think it made any difference as far as the
import or the meaning. But he just out of a clear sky walked in to
see you and told you he had connections with the union ?

Mr. Marks. No ; in discussion he asked what we had and we showed
him.

The Chairman. Had you ever seen him before ?

Mr. Marks. Never before that.

The Chairman. He was a total stranger to you ?

Mr. Marks. That is rio:ht.

The Chairman, Before you got through with the conversation you
had hired him, had you ?

Mr, Marks. I don't know if we did it immediately. It may have,
been a day or two or a week later, but we hired him.

The Chairman. During that time, if you did delay it a day or two
or a week later, during that time you made no check on him at all ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

The Chairman. You sought no references ?

Mr. Marks. No, sir.

The Chairman. Proceed.

Senator Goldwater. Do you have any other sa lesmen ?

Mr. ]\L\RKS. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Had you

Mr. Marks. May I clear something else? I had tried to sell this
merchandise and I was getting nowheres, and this was a good way for
me to get a salesman to make calls. Subsceqnently, after 4 or .5 weeks,
nothing happened and we just walked away from the whole thing.

The Chairman. Is there anything further?

Mr. Kennedy. Had you sent 2,000 jackets to the Teamsters at the
time you sent them this invoice ?

Mr. Marks. Had we sent them ?

Mr. Kennedy, Yes.

Mr. Marks. Not at the time of the invoice. We were supposed to
give an invoice at which time they would give us a check against it
for the manufacture of the jackets. In other words, a deposit.

Mr, Kennedy. So you actually didn't send them ?

Mr, Marks, No, We subsequently billed as we sent them out,

Mr. Kennedy. Did you make jackets for anyone else besides 299?

Mr. Marks. Yes, a few unions.

Mr. Kennedy. Wlinf unions?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19023

Mr. Marks. Well, you have tlie records there. I wouldn't remem-
ber,

Mr. Kennedy. What do they show ?

Mr. Belling. Various locals. No. 107.

]\r>. Ktpxnedv. You made 150 for No. 107 ?

Mr. Marks. That is right.

Air. ivKANEDY. And you got paid $12.75 ?

Mr. Marks. $1-2.75.

Mr. Kennedy. What conversations did you have w itii Mr. Berger
in connection with making these jackets?

Mr. Marks. Who?

Mr. Kennedy. ]Mr. Nat Berger.

Mr. Marks. Nat Berger ? I don't know a Nat Berger.

Mr. Kennedy. Sol Leibowitz — do you remember him ?

Mr. Marks. I don't remember.

Mr. Kennedy. Didn't you go to Mr. Nat Berger and Mr. Leibowitz,
about making some of these jackets for $9.75, or $9.50, and there were
going to be several hmidreds of thousands of them ? That is this year.

Mr. jVLa.rks. What is the name of the firm? I went around shop-
ping, trjdng to get the jackets made cheaper; sure I did.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you tell anybody there would be hundreds of
thousands of these jackets?

Mr. Marks. I said there would be quantities if we could get them,
that we had to solicit the business.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you tell them you had made the arrangements
that there was going to be a jacket for every Teamster Union member?

Mr. Marks. No, sir ; never.

Mr. Kennedy. That is all.

The Chairman. All right. Thank you. You may stand aside.
Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Nat Gordon.

The Chairman. Mr. Gordon, come forward, please.

Mr. Kennedy. Do you want to stand by, Mr. Marks ?

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give
before this Senate select conmiittee shall be the truth, the whole truth,
and nothing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Gordon. I do.

TESTIMONY OF NAT GORDON, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
J. M. SCHIFEER

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your
business or occupation.

Mr. Gordon. Nathan Gordon, 27(5 East 15th Street, Far Rockaway,
N.Y.

The Chairman. Do you have any business or occupation, Mr.
Gordon ?

Mr. Gordon. Senator, I respectfully decline to answer the question
on the gi'ounds it may tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Do you have counsel ?

Let the record show the same counsel appeal's for this witness as
for the previous witness.

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy.

."'.OTni— 59— f)t. 54 16



19024 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Gordon, ryou were a witness here before this
committee in 1957, were you not ?

Mr. Gordon. I respectfully decline to answer that question on the
ground it may tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. At that time you were identified as being a part of



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