Copyright
United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) online

. (page 29 of 38)
Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Select CommitteeInvestigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) → online text (page 29 of 38)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. They had a note of a man by the name of Gus
DeMeo. This is just to make sure we have the full facts in the record,
Mr. Chairman, and it is slightly complicated.

The Chairman. This is the background ; is that correct ?

Mr. Kennedy. That is correct.

They had a note of a man by the name of Gus DeMeo, and he owned
a company called the Aircraft Instrument Corp. ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. And they were at that time in default to the bank ;
is that right ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. On a mortgage ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. So that you agreed to take over DeMeo's mortgage
and pay his note ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And you then got a mortgage on DeMeo's property
which consisted of 39 PBY's, Catalina Flying Boats, 1 Lockheed
Lodestar commercial plane, and I^lSA's, a liaison plane, and some
other small items ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. So therefore, in order to do that you had to put up
$500,000; is that right?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. To pay off his note ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. So the Pan American Bank then loaned you
$840,000?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And then arranged for another loan of $200,000 ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. So you received $1,040,000, approximately?

Mr. Benjamin. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. With the $1,040,000, you used $500,000 to pay the
Pan American Bank to buy DeMeo's debt?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. $500,000 on August 25, 1958, to the U.S. Air Force?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. And the balance was used to move one of the planes
from Davis-Monthan Air Force BavSe at Tucson, Ariz., to Hamilton
Aircraft Co., Tucson, Ariz.

Mr. Benjamin. And to pay the insurance of $400,000.

(At this point Senator Goldwater entered the hearing room.)



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19035

Mr. Kennedy. So you got the $1 million and you spent it all in the
manner that I have described ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is true.

Mr. Kennedy. And in exchange the Pan American Bank had your
note for $840,000. the mortgage on the 4 released C-74's, and the
mortgage DeMeo had given Akros on the other 50 airplanes ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is true.

Mr. Kennedy. The loan was set up for 60 days, and renewed No-
vember 3, 1958, for an additional 60 days?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And the interest to October 17, 1958, is $8,400, and
amounts now to $140 a day ; is that right ?

Mr. Benjamin. I believe that is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And there are some financial difficulties at the pres-
ent time ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Now, prior to and during and subsequent to the
loan from the bank, you had been attempting to sell or lease these
airplanes?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. You had one source that you thought you would be
able to lease the planes to, and that fell through; is that right?

Mr. Benjamin. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. And you tried to sell the airplanes to the Greek-
Ethiopian Airlines ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And other sources outside the United States ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes.

Mr. Kjennedy. Because use of the planes within the continental
United States was prohibited unless certain certification requirements
were fulfilled?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And again while the planes were not certified, you
had difficulty selling them outside also ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Now, on January 21, 1959, you executed an agree-
ment, is that right, with Dominick Bartone ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. And Jack LaRue ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. They are president and vice president respectively,
of the International Trading Co., Inc. ?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Now, Dominick Bartone is a very important figure in
the whole transaction ; is that right ?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, he was going to sell the aircraft.

Mr. Kennedy. And he is the same individual who was recently ar-
rested down in Miami, Fla., in connection with the arms shipments ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, I read it in the papers, and I haven't talked
to him since then.

Mr. Kennedy. And this agreement that was executed on January 21,
1959, gave LaRue and Bartone an option on two airplanes, which Bar-
tone said he could sell in Cuba ; is that right ?



19036 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Bartone paid nothing for the option, but expected
to receive a commission from the Cuban Government; was that the
understanding ?

Mr. Benjamin. No, I don't know of any understanding like that.
My understanding was we were to pay him a commission if he sold
them.

Mr. Kennedy. What was the commission you were going to pay ?

Mr. Benjamin. Ten percent, I believe.

Mr. Kennedy. How did Mr. Bartone happen to come into the
picture ?

Mr. Benjamin. I met Mr Bartone in Mr. Alvin Naiman's office.
They come up to Mr. Naiman's office and said they had a chance to sell
the airplanes in Cuba, and we were acceptable to sell them to anybody
who was a reliable person to buy them.

Mr. Ejennedy. Did you know anything about the background of Mr.
Bartone at the time ?

Mr. Benjamin. No. I had met Mr. Bartone prior to that, but I
knew nothing of his background.

Mr. Kennedy. Did joii know how he happened to be in Mr. Nai-
man's office?

Mr. Benjamin. No, I don't.

Mr. Kennedy. Do you know who brought him in or anything ?

Mr. Benjamin. No, I don't know.

Mr. Kennedy. Castro had just taken over in Cuba at that time, had
he not — some 3 weeks before ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, I believe it was right around there.

Mr. Kennedy. The price to the Cuban Government was to be some
$400,000 apiece for the airplanes ?

Mr. Benjamin. That was my understanding.

Mr. Kennedy. And subject to the approval of the U.S. Department
of State?

Mr. Benjamin. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. Subsequently,^ in February of 1959, did you grow a
little pessimistic as to how this whole operation was working out ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes. Things, you might say, were tightening up,
and it wasn't getting any results; I mean we heard of no results or
nothing.

Mr. Kennedy. So, did you have some further conversations with
Mr. Naiman about wliat steps could be taken?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes. Well, Mr. Naiman said there was an oppor-
tunity there tx) make a bailout deal, sell the whole thing to a group
on the west coast.

Mr. Kennedy. Who was the group on the west coast ?

Mr. Benjamin. I don't know. It was just the Bartone-LaRue
group. They were handling the transaction.

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Naiman approach you about that ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes — I mean, it was discussed right tliere in tlie
office.

Mr. Kennedy. What arrangements were you going to make then
to sell out ?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, we signed agreements and resigned as officers
and directors of the corporation, and turned all our stock over to
Mr. Naiman.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19037

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know who was going to get the stock then ?

Mr. Benjamin. No, we didn't.

Mr. Kennedy. It was a transfer in blank of all the stock; is that
right?

Mr. Benjamin. That is true.

Mr. Kennedy. Did Mr. Naiman tell you at that time who was
behind the Bartone-LaRue group?

Mr. Benjamin. No, he didn't.

Mr. Kennedy. Can we have these documents identified and also
the Akros stock certificates, Mr. Chairman ?

The Chairman. I hand you here two photostatic copies. One is
addressed to Akros Dynamics Corp., dated February 11, 1959, bearing
some six signatures; and the other is of the same date, addressed to
Alvin A, Naiman, bearing, I believe, the same signatures as the former.

Would you examine these two documents and state if you identify
them as photostatic copies of the originals ?

(The documents were handed to the witness.)

Mr. Benjamin. These are true copies.

The Chairman. They are correct copies ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. They may be made exhibits No. 25 and 25-A.

Documents referred to were marked "Exhibits Nos. 25 and 25A"^
for reference and will be found in the appendix on pp. 19133-19134.)

The Chairman. Now I hand you a number of photostatic copies of
stock certificates and ask you to examine those and state if they are
the stock certificates referred to in the preceding exhibit.

(The documents were handed to the witness. )

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. Those stock certificates may be made exhibit No.
25-B.

(Documents referred to were market "Exhibit No. 25-B" for ref-
erence and may be found in the files of the select committee.)

Mr. Kennedy. After this agreement was made, we have this letter,
Exhibit No. 25, dated February 11, 1959 :

Gentlemen : We the undersigned do herewith resign as officers, directors, and
stockholders of Aliros Dynamics Corp.

and then it lists the names. Then another letter dated February 11,
1959:

Dear Sib : We the undersigned do herewith enclose our certificates of shares
of stock of Akros Dynamics Corp., duly executed by us, together with our resig-
nations as officers, directors, and stockholders of the aforesaid company.

You are herewith authorized to use and retain these certificates of shares-
of stock, together with our resignations only upon the following terms and
conditions :

That you complete your transaction with the group known as LaRue & Bar-
tone. However, should you not complete this matter, then you are herewith
instructed to return our enclosed stock certificates and resignations.

That is a letter to Mr. Alvin Naiman. Did you ever receive your
stock certificates and resignations back ?

Mr. Benjamin. No.

Mr. Kennedy. They haven't been returned to you ?

Mr. Benjamin. They have been returned to Mr. William Steiner
about a week ago.



19038 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. About a week ago? After our investigation began;
is that right?

Mr. Benjamin. That is true.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know of an agreement made between Mr.
Naiman and a man by the name of Herbert Burris, to turn over your
company ?

Mr. Benjamin. No. I didn't.

Mr. Kennedy. Was that agreement shown to you by our
investigator ?

Mr. Benjamin. It was shown in Mr. Naiman's office by your
investigators.

Mr. Kennedy. Had you known about it prior to that time ?

Mr. Benjamin. No ; I hadn't.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know who Mr. Herbert Burris was ?

Mr. Benjamin. No ; I never heard of the name.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you know what the background of Mr. Naiman
turning the company over to Mr. Burris was?

Mr. Benjamin. No, I knew nothing of that.

Mr. Kennedy. Was there authorization to turn the company over
to Burris ?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, we signed off. I didn't know who Mr. Burris
was. We signed and we heard no more about it.

Mr. Kennedy. And it wasn't until a week ago that you got your
company back?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, it was a week ago, I think, a week ago that
Mr. Steiner took the stock down to Florida.

The Chairman. What had happened in the meantime? Had you
pursued the matter any further to find out whether the proposition
was progressing and succeeding?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes.

The Chairman. What reports had you had on it?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, that things were going to be taken care of,
and they were being taken care of. But in checking, we found the
bank wasn't taken care of.

The Chairman. Who was making these reports to you?

Mr. Benjamin. Mr. Naiman.
^ The Chairman. Mr. Naiman was making reports from time to
time that things were going along and would come out all right?

Mr. Benjamin. That is true.

Mr. Kennedy. Is it correct that on April 8, 1959, you received a
package air express from a man by the name of A. W. Weinblatt,
Miami Beach?

Mr. Benjamin. That is correct.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you open that package?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes.

Mr. Kennedy. And did it contain the corporation kit of Akros?

Mr. Benjamin. It contained the corporation records.

Mr. Kennedy. Were you surprised at that?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, I was surprised I had gotten them back.

Mr. Kennedy. Had you known they had been sent anyplace?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, I understood when we turned everything
over to Mr. Naiman that this whole new outfit was taking everything.

Mr. Kennedy. What was the reason that is was returned to you ?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19039

Mr. Benjamin. I don't know.

Mr. Kennedy. Do you find that the operation of the company
after February 11, or so, was shrouded in some mystery, as far as
you were concerned?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, I wouldn't know it was a mystery or not.
We resigned as officers, and legally or technically we had nothing
more to say until the deal was all tied up. But I got no information.

Mr. Kennedy. According to the agreement that you made, it was
to be turned over to LaRue & Bartone. Do you know how Mr, Burris
got into it?

Mr. Benjamin. No, I don't.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever hear of Mr. Benjamin Dranow?

Mr, Benjamin. I have heard of Mr. Dranow. Mr. Naiman was
talking on the telephone and I asked who he was because I heard the
name Pan American Bank, and he said he was a banker, Mr. Dranow
was a banker.

Senator Curtis. Do you still owe the bank? Does the company
still owe the bank ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Senator Curtis. How much money ?

Mr. Benjamin. All of it.

Senator Curtis. How much is that ?

Mr. Benjamin. $1,040,000, plus the interest.

Senator Curtis, How much does the interest run a day or a month ?

Mr. Benjamin. It is 6 percent a year.

Senator Curtis. $140 or $150 a day, isn't it?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Senator Curtis. You haven't been able to locate a buyer for these
planes ?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, the thing is we suffered from lack of capital.
In order to have a buyer, we need the aircraft to be certified, which
could be done, but it probably would have cost $50,000 to $60,000 a
plane, which would make it a valuable aircraft probably worth in
the neighborhood anywhere upward of $400,000 to $500,000 an
airplane.

Senator Curtis. Each one of them ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Senator Curtis. How many are there ?

Mr, Benjamin. There are 11 of them. It is the largest cargo
piston-driven plane today.

Senator Curtis. They are in good shape ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir, in beautiful shape.

Senator Curtis. Where are they ?

Mr. Benjamin, Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, in Tucson.

Mr, Kennedy. Do you own all 11 now ?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, the contract says we own all 11, We didn't
pay for them, I mean, we bought them. We received title to four.

Mr. Kennedy. Do you have the parts, then, now ?

Mr. Benjamin. We have some parts.

Mr. Kennedy. Do you own all the parts ?

Mr. Benjamin, I would say we moved all the parts from Mobile.
We own the parts.

Mr. Kennedy. Do you own the parts for all 11 ?

36751— 59— pt. 54 17



19040 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. What if you can't pay for the other seven? The
Air Force will have seven airplanes without the parts ?

Mr. Benjamin. Well, parts — I wouldn't say it was parts for all 11,
because it was just what they figured was parts that would be needed
to operate. Like we don't have any extra nose wheels in our parts.

Mr. Kennedy. What is the Air Force going to do if you can't pay
for the other seven, if they don't have any spare parts ?

Mr. Benjamin. I couldn't tell you what they would do. I wish
I knew.

Mr. Kennedy. Nobody will buy them at all then, will they? If
you have all the parts and they have the seven airplanes

Mr. Benjamin. We don't have all the parts.

Mr. Kennedy. Do they have any parts left ?

Mr. Benjamin. They have parts ; yes.

Mr. Kennedy. They do have parts ?

Mr. Benjamin. Yes, and these parts are comparable to DC-7 and
DC-6 aircraft. They are flying airplanes today.

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. Thank you.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Herbert R. Burris.

The Chairman. Be sworn, Mr. Burris.

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this
Senate select connnittee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and noth-
ing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Burris. I do.

TESTIMONY OF HERBERT R. BURRIS, ACCOMPAIOED BY COUNSEL,
H. CLIFFORD ALLDER

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence and busi-
ness or occupation.

Mr. Burris. Herbert R. Burris, 19 West 44th Street, New York
City, attorney at law.

The Chairman. Thank you very much.

You have counsel. Let the record show that Mr. Allder appears
for the witness.

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Burris, we have had some testimony here in
connection with an agreement that was made by Mr. Naiman with you
in connection with Akros.

Could you tell us how you got into the Akros company or what
you had to do witli it ?

Mr. Burris. I wish you would ask this photographer to move aside
for a moment. It is disturbing.

The Ci 1 A] rman. Mr. Photographer, get to one side.

In the meantime, make no other snaps or pictures during the course
of the witness' testimony.

Proceed.

Mr. Burris. I believe the question was — would you repeat the exact
question again, please ?

Mr. Kennedy. What I would like to find out is how you got into
Akros Dynamics, Avhat you had to do with that.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19041

Mr. BuRRis. Well, I don't know the exact date, but it was a day or
two or three prior to the date of that ao:reement. That is in the middle
of February, I received a phone call from Mr. Benjamin Dranow
asking me to go to Cleveland to look into the merits of a plane propo-
sition, an airplane proposition. I got on the plane, went to Cleveland.
He told me to see Mr. Louis Triscaro.

Mr. Kennedy. Who is Mr. Louis Triscaro ?

Mr. BuRRis. He is an official of the Teamsters Union of one of the
locals in Cleveland, Ohio ?

Mr. Kennedy. Local 346 ?

Mr. BuRRis. I don't recall the number.

Mr. Triscaro introduced me to Mr. Naiman, and Mr. Naiman ex-
plained what the airplane setup was, showed me various papers, and I
sat back and analyzed the situation very briefly in my mind, and
thought there was merit to it.

Mr. Kennedy. Where did you have this meeting?

Mr. BuRRis. I went to Cleveland, I went to Mr. Triscaro's office and
Mr. Naiman came over to Mr. Triscaro's office.

Mr. Kennedy. So this meeting in connection with the plane was held
in Mr. Triscaro's office ?

Mr. BuRRis. Yes; but Mr. Triscaro wasn't there particularly. He
sort of let us talk together. He had other business.

Mr. Kennedy. Was he there at all ?

Mr. BuRRis. Yes; he was. He introduced us.

^Ir. Kennedy. I am afraid I got the local wrong. It is local 436..

Mr. BuRRis. I don't remember the number.

Mr. Kennedy. Go ahead.

Mr. BuRRis. I phoned Mr. Dranow. Mr. Dranow said, "Well it
sounds all right," if I like the idea, and I said, "Well, from a pre-
liminary survey, it seems OK.'"

Mr. Dranow, being the principal here that I represent, I think he
told me, or spoke to Mr. Naiman or Mr. Triscaro, I forget at the time,
but there was a telephone call and we went down to Florida.

Mr. Kennedy. From Cleveland ?

Mr. BuRRis. From Cleveland, stopping in New York, going from
New York to Florida.

Mr. Kennedy. What do you mean, you stopped in New York on
your way to Florida ?

Mr. BuRRis. Well, the same day that I went to Cleveland I returned
to New York. They came along. The next morning

Mr. Kennedy'. Who is "they" ?

Mr. BuRRis. Mr. Triscaro and Mr. Naiman.

Mr. Kennedy. So the three of you went to New York ?

Mr. BuRRis. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. What did you do in New York ?

Mr. BuRRis. In New York, it was late at night, or in the early eve-
ning, I forget which, and we met with my father

Mr. Kennedy. What is your father's name ?

Mr. BuRRis. S. George Burris.

Mr. Kennedy. We had him as a witness yesterday.

Mr. BuRRis. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. Go ahead.



19042 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. BuRRis. And we went to Miami the next morning, as I recall,
to meet with Mr. Dranow.

Mr. Kennedy. Whv did you meet with your father ?

Mr. BuRRis. Well, ^ first of all, I had to come back to New York.
My father has business in Florida and goes back and forth all the
time.

Mr. Kennedy. That doesn't explain why you met with your father
that night.

Mr. Burets. I always do when I come back to the office, when I come
back at the end of a trip.

Mr. Kennedy. Wliy did Mr. Triscaro and Mr. Naiman meet with
your father ?

Mr. Burets. They were along with me.

Mr. Kennedy. They couldn't fly by themselves to Florida ?

Mr. Burets. They probably could have, but they didn't Maybe
the plane connections were not direct, and I don't recall.

Mr. Kennedy. Is it more direct to get to Florida from Cleveland
than to go via New York ?

Mr. Burets. I don't know. You probably know that better than
I do, but there is nothing unusual about it.

The Chaieman. Is there any significance in their going with you
to have a conference with your father ?

Mr. Burets. No ; nothing whatsoever.

The Chairman. Did your father have any interest in this trans-
action in any way ?

Mr. Burrts. My father knew nothing about the transaction, nor
did Mr. Dranow until the time that I went to Cleveland, as far as
I know.

The Chairman. Mr. Dranow employed you ?

Mr. Burets. Yes, sir ; I have done work for Mr. Dranow.

The Chairman. But he employed you to look into this transaction,
and to look into this proposition ?

Mr. BuRRTS. That is right.

The Chairman. So you went to Cleveland at his instance, or he
retained you to do that?

Mr. BuRRis. That is right.

The Chairman. So you don't know how long before he knew or
had some interest in the matter ?

Mr. BuRRis. I can tell you what he told me. He didn't know any-
thing about it.

The Chairman. I would say except for what he told you, that is
all right.

'My. Kennedy. Did Mr. Triscaro and Mr. Naiman meet with your
father in New York that night?

Mr. Burets. They met and we all went back to the office and I think
tliat I had arranged for hotel accommodations for them on the phone.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you discuss this plane deal back at the office?

Mr. BuERis. Very briefly, and I told it to my father.

Mr. Kennedy. You did discuss it?

Mr. Burets. Discuss it, no; hardly discussed it. I just went over
the bi-ief highlights, and I spent a few hours on it in Cleveland.

Mr. Kennedy. You reviewed the papers with your father, and Mr.
Triscaro and Mr. Naiman were present?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 19043

Mr, BuRRis. Very briefly; the papers are very voluminous in that
deal.

Mr. Kennedy. So you went to New York.

Mr. BuRRis. And I gave him the highlights.

Mr. Kennedy. Then you went to Florida.

Mr. BuRRis. But my father was not particularly interested in this,
but anything that I do that has any effect, I generally talk over with
him, unless it is a privileged communication.

Mr. Kennedy. Then what did you do ?

Mr. BuRRis. We went down to Miami and met with Mr. Dranow
and I probably gave Mr. Dranow the highlights of it and turned the
principals over one to another to really discuss it and I wasn't as
familiar with it as Mr. Naiman.

The Chairman. Was Mr. Dranow in Miami at the time that he
called you and arranged for you to go out to Cleveland?

Mr. Burris. I believe so.

The Chairman. Or did he contact you there in New York ?

Mr. Burris. Mr. Dranow wasn't in New York; he was in Miami
or one of the Miami suburbs or something.

The Chairman. He called you from somewhere else and arranged
for you to go from New York to Cleveland ?

Mr. Burris. He called me from somewhere. He called me from
Florida.

The Chairman. He called you from somewhere in Florida?

Mr. Burris. That is right.

The Chairman. And arranged for you to go to Cleveland ?

Mr. Burris. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. After you made the trip to Cleveland, then you in
turn, you and Mr. Triscaro and Mr. Naiman, met him in Miami ?

Mr. Burris. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. And you left your father in New York ?

Mr. Burris. My father went down to Miami.

Mr. Kennedy. Your father went to Miami ?

Mr. Burris. Both my father and I had other business in Miami.

Mr. Kennedy. You all went on the plane together to Miami ?

Mr. Burris. That is right. We didn't come back together.

Mr. Kennedy. All right; go ahead. What happened down in
Miami?

Mr. Burris. What is that?

Mr. Kennedy. Wliat happened in Miami ?

Mr. Burris. Well, that is the gist of it.

Mr. Kennedy. Who did you meet with there ?



Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Select CommitteeInvestigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) → online text (page 29 of 38)