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United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) online

. (page 4 of 38)
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you gave a truthful answer to that question that a truthful answer
might tend to incriminate you, don't you realize that that may be
giving the impression to people who hear or learn about this testi-
mony that you think it would be likely to incriminate you to be in the
presence of the president of the international union? Don't you
realize it may give some that impression ?

Mr. CozzA. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.



18812 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

The Chairman. I wouldn't think it very complimentary. I don't
know how you feel about it, but I wouldn't reijard it as a compliment
to me if someone who happened to be in the picture with me, when
asked about it, said "I can't talk about that. It might incriminate me.""

I would feel like he thought maybe his presence or association with
me would be incriminating. Do joii have any comment to make
about it ?

Mr. CozzA. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. The picture may be made exhibit No. 2.

(Photo referred to was marked "Exhibit No. 2" for reference and
may be found in the files of the select committee.)

Mr. Kennedy. Would you tell us the taxes that the union paid for
the Cadillac, and the rest of the information ?

Mr. Salinger. The taxes on that $3,000 Mr. Cozza got to go to
Europe amounted to $521.79, paid by the local. It is of some note that
Mr. Cozza received $450, which was 18 days advance at $25 a day to
go to the Teamster International Convention in Miami, Fla., in 1957,
and during that entire 18-day period was carried on the rolls of the
Pittsburgh Sun-Telegi'aph.

The Chairman. Would you say there would be a conflict of interast
where you took money from (he paper and where you took money
alro from the union i

Mr. Cozza. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Wouldn't yc)U say that by taking money both from
your union to represent it, and money from the paper to represent it,
or to refrain from acts that might be undesirabe from the paper's
standpoint or view, wouldn't you say you were placing yourself in a
position of trying to serve two masters^

Mr. Cozza. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Proceed.

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

I might add that the dinner that Mr. Hofl'a spoke before on behalf
of Mr. Cozza took ])lace, I believe, on November 2, 1958, at which time
this picture was taken. That was some months after we first brought
out the derogatory information regarding Mr. Cozza.

The Chairman. Is that information in error, Mr. Cozza ?

Mr. Cozza. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Are you willing to do anything whatsoever to co-
operate with this connnittee. to aid it in carrying out its duties under
the resolution establishing it (

Are you willing to do anything to cooperate with it, to assist your
Government in carrying out this mission, and performing this duty
to the Congress ?

Mr. Cozza, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. It might incriminate you to serve your country?
Is that what you are saying ?

Mr. Cozza. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18813

The Chairman. Are there any other questions ?

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. Stand aside.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Harry Gross.

The Chairman. Be sworn, please.

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall jjive before this Senate
select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but
the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Gross, I do.

TESTIMONY OF HAROLD GROSS, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
H. CLIFFORD ALLDER

The Chairman. Will you state your name, your place of residence,
and your business or occupation, please, sir ?

(The witness conferred with his counsel.)

Mr. Gross. Harold Gross, 64-11 99th Street, Long Island.

The Chairman. Will you conclude your answer to the question?

Mr. Allder. What was the rest of the question, Senator?

The Chairman. What is his business or occupation?

(The witness conferred with his counsel.)

Mr. Gross. I respectfully decline to answer on the grounds I hon-
estly believe the answer may tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Are you honest in that? Do you honestly believe
it or are you making that statement irrespective of the truth of it?

Mr. Gross. Yes.

The Chairman. Yes what ?

Mr. Gross. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. Yes you are honestly making the statement, or are
you making it irrespective of the truth of it ?

Mr. Gross. I honestly believe the answer may tend to incriminate
me.

The Chairman. Proceed.

Let the record show the same counsel appears for this witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we have had testimony in connection
with Mr. Gross already, that he was arrested and convicted of grand
larceny and the possession of burglar tools in 1937. In 1942 he was
convicted of extortion and sentenced to an indefinite term in the New
York City Penitentiary. He was paroled on May 1, 1945. We had
testimony that he was' a member of Murder, Inc., and that he was
working for a Teamster local that was set up by Murder, Inc.

We had testimony that he was placed on the payroll of the Neo~
Gravure Co. in 1945 to bring labor peace, and he and associates of
his received some $307,000 in a period of approximately 14 years;
that in addition to that, that they received some $45,000 from two
newspapers in New York City, Mr. Gross and Mr. Comiie Noonan
received some $45,000 from two newspapers in New York City for
the purpose of insuring deliveries during the period when there was
a. strike in existence.

^ We had testimony that, despite this record, in October of 1948 Mr.
(rross was made a Teamster Union official; at the same time he was
on the payroll of the Neo-Gravure (^o.. lie Avas made a Teamster Union
official of local 820 in Miami, Fla.



18814 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Gross, we would like to ask, in view of the testimony before
this committee and the documents that have been presented to the
committee, has any action been taken to remove you from your posi-
tion as president of local 320 ?

Mr. Gross. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Mr. Gross, these statements that have been made
with regard to your record as shown by the evidence before this com-
mittee, do you wish to correct any of those statements if they are in
error ?

Mr. Gross. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer my tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. I don't see how your answer could incriminate you,
unless you admitted that the record is correct, or unless you said that
the record is even worse than what the testimony here reflects.

Do you wish to comment on that ?

Mr. Gross. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer my tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Mr. Kennedy, has this witness appeared before us
before ?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes. And we have had that information, Mr.
Chairman, in the record. He was made head of this local 320 some
16 or 18 months after our hearings began, even though he had this
criminal record and even though he had been shaking down these
employers durmg this period of time.

Not only was he made head of the local, but that local was being
financed by the international imion, Mr. Hoffa directly, at $3,000
per month. He was having his salary paid out of that, as well as his
obtaining the red Thunderbird, as well as the automobile for his son,
while in Miami, Fla. The local had 32 members the last we looked
at it.

The Chairman. In other words, assuming the record before this
committee, the sworn record, is coiTect, the issue presented here, the
thing that is of concern to members of the committee, and I am sure
to the public, is after these exposures are made, these acts that are
criminal, not just merely improper conduct, but actually criminal acts,
after tliey are exposed, what is being done, if anything, to clean up
the situation by the union itself ?

If nothing is being done, then the question arises: Is it imperative
that Congress enact legislation to try to correct the conditions ? Or
must we all just surrender and do nothing?

Here is the opportunity and there was the promise on the part of
Mr. Hoffa to try to clean up this situation, and after we make these
exposures it goes on and on. We bring a witness like this in here and
ask him if he is an official of the union or what his connection is with
the union or what is his business or occupation, and he says under
oath that if lie answered the question truthfully, a truthful answer
might tend to incriminate him.

The question is : Can a government, based on law ;ind order, and can
a decent society longer tolerate such conditions in this country and
the impact that it is liaving upon our econom}^ and upon our social,
political, and economic life?

Is there a duty now, at this session of Congress, resting u[)on the
Congress to undertake to deal with this by legislation ?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18815

I think there is,



Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Select CommitteeInvestigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) → online text (page 4 of 38)