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United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) online

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Mr. KJENNEDY. We, of course, have identified clearly, Mr. Chairman,
that Tony Ducks Corallo was an important figure in narcotics during
our hearings in 1957.

Did the other gentleman, Mr. D'Auria, and did Mr. Spada, have a
record ?

Mr, Tierney. Mr. Spada has a record consisting of two arrests,
convicted on one, a violation of the ABC laws and fined $150.

Mr. Kennedy. Would you give us any information as to how you
received your employment, Mr. Spada ?

Mr. Spada. I respectfully decline to answer on the grounds that it
may tend to incriminate me.

Mr, Kennedy. Mr. D'Auria ?

Mr. D'Auria. I respectfully decline to answer on the grounds it
may tend to incriminate me.



18838 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. Is there anything decent about your relationship
with this union that you can talk about ?

Mr. Spada. I respectfully decline to answer on the grounds that it
may tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. I wouldn't want you to be denied the opportunity.
I want you to understand you have the opportunity to make any
statement that you care to about it.

I assume then you can't.

Mr. Kennedy. We can't find, Mr. Chairman, anywhere, that either
of these three gentlemen, Mr. Castaldi or these two gentlemen, ever
had any experience in this field as union organizers prior to the time
that they came with this union.

We have further found upon investigation that Mr. Tony Ducks
Corallo still controls this union, he still controls Local 522 of the
Teamsters, and local 875, three locals that he was identified as con-
trolling in 1957; that according to the information we have, Mr.
Tony Ducks Corallo still controls those three locals as well as this
local, local 239.

His resigning from the union in September of 1958 was merely
a fraud and a subterfuge.

Mr. TiERNEY. Mr. Spada was listed as a local in 275, one of the
original paper locals.

Mr. Kennedy. That was a paper local set up by Tony Ducks
Corallo?

Mr. TiERNEY. Yes.

Senator Kennedy. Mr. D'Auria, do you get a check every week for
$173?

Is that correct, or do they get expenses ?

Mr. TiERNEY. Actually, this is with deductions, Senator. They get
$175 total gross salary, plus $25 expenses.

Senator Kennedy. $200 a week ?

Mr. TiERNEY. $200 a week.

Senator Kennedy. These checks are endorsed almost the next day
in every case ?

Mr. TiERNEY. That is right.

Senator Kennedy. Do they have a bank account ?

Mr, TiERNEY. Not that we know about.

Senator Kennedy. Do you have a bank account any place ?

Mr. D'AuRiA. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the
grounds it might tend to incriminate me.

Senator Kennedy. In other words, you don't find any cash in their
possession? At least, there is no evidence that you have of it?

Mr. TiERNEY. None, sir.

Senator Kennedy. Do they have any other income that you know of ?

Mr. TiERNEY. Not that I know of.

Senator Kennedy. Do they drive a truck ?

Mr. TiERNEY. We don't know.

Senator Kennedy. Do you drive trucks ?

Mr. D'AuRiA. I respectfully decline to answer the question on the
grounds it may tend to incriminate me.

Senator Kjennedy. How about you ?

Mr. Spada. I respectfully decline to answer on the grounds that it
may tend to incriminate me.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18839

Senator Kennedy. You wouldn't give us any infonnation on what
your services may be for which you are being compensated $200 each
week?

Mr. D'AuRiA. I refuse to answer the question on the grounds that
it may tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. Stand aside.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. I might say, Mr. Chairman, we have gone up there
and tried to get some information in connection with the operation of
running the union and we can't get any answers from anybody in the
local.

Senator Kennedy. The checks are signed by Mr. Bernard Stein,
secretary-treasurer, and Eugene Ciner as business representative.

Will they give you any information as to what the services are that
are being rendered ?

Mr. TiERNEY. No ; we tried to get the information from Mr. Stein,
but he wouldn't furnish any information at all.

Senator Kennedy. What does he say ?

Mr. TiERNEY. He refuses to talk.

The Chairman. Mr. Tierney, do you identify these as original
checks that you were a;ble to find in the course of investigating the
records of this local ?

Mr. TiERNEY. I do.

The Chairman. The checks, in bulk, may be made exhibit No. 6
for reference.

(Checks referred to were marked "Exhibit No. 6" for reference and
may be found in the files of the select committee.)

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Hendricks, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. DiRENzo. Are you finished with Mr. Goldstein ?

Mr. Kennedy. Yes.

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that tlie evidence you shall
give before this Senate select committee shall be the ti-uth, the w^iole
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Hendricks. I do.

TESTIMONY OF HERMAN HENDRICKS, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
BERNARD J. MELLMAN

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your
business or occupation.

Mr. Hendricks. My name is Herman Hendricks. I live at 3952
Sullivan Street, St. Louis, Mo.

The Chairman. Have you any business or occupation, legitimate or
otherwise ?

Mr. Hendricks. I decline to answer and assert my privilege under
the fifth amendment of the U.S. Constitution not to be a witness
against myself.

The Chairman. You have counsel here to represent you, do you?

Mr. Hendricks. I have.

The Chairman. Counsel, will you identify yourself for the record,
please ?

Mr. Mellman. Bernard J. Mellman, St. Louis, Mo.



18840 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

The Chairman. Proceed.

Mr. I^NNEDY. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Hendricks appeared before the
committee in September 1958. He was identified at that time and
remains, as we understand it, still a business agent of local 688.

The Chairman. Are you a business agent of local 688 ?

Mr. Hendricks. I decline to answer and assert my privilege under
the fifth amendment of the U.S. Constitution not to be a witness
against myself.

Mr. Kennedy. He has a criminal background. He has been ar-
rested a number of different times. He has a conviction, a narcotics
conviction, for the possession of 114 marihuana cigarettes and 8
ounces of bulk marihuana. He was sentenced to 2 years in the Fed-
eral penitentiary at Terre Haute, Ind. Even though he has that con-
viction, as well as a number of others, Mr. Hoffa describes Mr.
Hendricks' conviction on page 15018 as a "picket line scuffle."

He was identified before the committee in September 1958 as par-
ticipating in the beating of some of the cabdrivers when the union
was attempting to organize them some years ago.

He remains as a union official even with this background.

Isn't that correct, Mr. Hendricks ?

Mr. Hendricks. I decline to answer and assert my privilege under
the fifth amendment of the U.S. Constitution not to be a witness
against myself.

^ Mr. Kennedy. He is still a business agent. The facts in connec-
tion with his background were brought out before the committee in
September of 1958, and he still remains a union official, even though
Mr. Hoffa stated also on page 15025 :

Mr. Hoffa. I don't know anything about narcotics pushers.
Senator Ives. They have been in the union anyway.
Mr. Hoffa. They have not been in my union.

Mr. Hendricks has a conviction for that.

Senator Kennedy. Didn't Mr. Harold Gibbons, when he appeared,
say:

As I pointed out earlier, there is a committee set up to investigate anyone
in the 688 setup who takes the fifth. That committee will have the task of
investigating the question of his conviction for narcotics, and will take appro-
priate action.

Is there any evidence that Mr. Gibbons took any action ?

Mr. Kennedy. No, and this gentleman is in Mr. Gibbons' own
local.

Senator Kennedy. You have been interrogated by this committee,
the committee to which Mr. Gibbons made reference ?

Mr. Hendricks. I decline to answer and assert my privilege under
the fifth amendment of the U.S. Constitution not to be a witness
against myself.

Mr. Kennedy. This, once again, Mr. Chairman, is in the Central
Conference of Teamsters.

That is all.

The Chairman. Have you anything else to say for yourself?

(The witness conferred with his counsel.)

Mr. Hendricks. I decline to answer

The Chairman. I don't care whether you answer or not. I am
giving you the opportunity. If you have anything you want to say



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18841

for yourself, you have heard the statements made about you, do you
want to deny any of them ? I don't care whether you do or not.

Mr. Hendricks. I decline to answer and assert my privilege under
the fifth amendment.

The Chaikman. I don't care whether you answer. You can stand
aside.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Henry DeEoma.

The Chairman. Mr. DeEoma.

Mr. Kennedy. I will call a different witness, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. Wainwright.

The Chairman. Come forward.

Be sworn. You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give be-
fore this select committee will be the truth, the whole truth, and
nothing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Wainwright. I do.

TESTIMONY OF BRANCH WAINWRIGHT, ACCOMPANIED BY
COUNSEL, H. CLIFFORD ALLDER

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your
business or occupation, please.

Mr. Wainwright. My name is Branch Wainwright, route 1, Buf-
falo, Mo.

The Chairman. Do you make a living ?

Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Do you have any employment or business ?.

Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Do you think it might incriminate you to admit
that you make a living ?

Mr. Waina^tjight. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. All right^Mr. Kennedy.

Let the record show that Mr. AUder appears as counsel for the
witness.

Mr. Kennedy. This witness, IMr. Chairman, and what he has repre-
sented, has been a matter of considerable concern to the committee.
He is an assistant business agent of local 245 in Springfield, Mo., and
runs that local. He has a background w^hich includes a 1-year pro-
bation for burglary in 1934. He has been fined on a conviction for
burglary and larceny in 1948. He received a 2-year sentence in 1950
for felonious assault with intent to rob. He was released from the
State penitentiary, in Jefferson City, Mo., on December 1, 1951, and
withm a very short time went to work for the Missouri-Kansas Con-
ference of Teamsters, headed by Harold Gibbons.

Is that correct ? That is what we established, is it not, Mr. Wain-
wright ?

Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, we had the testimony in connection
with local 245. It was placed in trusteeship in 1950, and the local



18842 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

secretary- treasurer, Barrett, was removed for the mishandling of
union funds.

Following Barrett's dismissal, a man by the name of Nickels was
placed in charge of the local and ultimately he was elected by the
local membership to run the union. The union was rmi by hun until
1954. It was run so that the surplus in the treasury built up, while
under Mr. Barrett's regime the local was going banljrupt. Under
Mr. Nickels' regime, who had been elected by the local membership,
the treasury increased. However, Mr. Nickels became unpopular
with Gibbons, so the local was placed in trusteesliip. Mr. Hoffa and
Mr. Gibbons took the same Mr. Barrett who had been removed from
office for the misuse of miion funds and put him. in to run the union.
They also brought in Mr. Branch Wainwright, who had shortly be-
fore come out of the penitentiary. They brought him in to help Mr.
Barrett run the union. This was 1954.

In 1956, before a House committee, Mr. Ray L. Smith, owner of
Ray L. Smith & Son, made a statement that he had to pay $650.80 for
the period September 7 to September 28, 1952, as an extoition pay-
ment to Mr. Branch Wainwright. So Mr. Branch Wainwright has
the background of these convictions, and then there was testimony
before the House committee by an employer that lie had to pay him
money.

Then he was put in charge of this local with Mr. Barrett.

The Chairman. Who gave the testimony about having to pay?

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Ray L. Smith.

The Chairman. Do you want to deny the testimony that Mr. Ray
L. Smith gave against you as to your extorting money from him ? Do
you want to deny it ?

Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. I accept your invoking the fifth amendment as a
negative statement that you do not want to deny, because if you want
to, you are given the opportunity.

Mr. Kennedt. He stated at that time, Mr. Chairman, that Wain-
wright would perform no work for the company nnd was hired solely
to avoid labor difficulties. So we have that as the background. Then
Nickels, who had been in charge of the local, who had been elected by
the membership, was forced to leave town because of the pressure that
was placed on employers by this local, by Mr. Wainwright, there were
no employers that would hire him so he was gradually starving to
death and had to leave town.

Another man, Mr. Rogers, who was in opposition to Mr. Wain-
wright, had only 4 weeks work in 1958, when he testified on September
9, 1958. In May of 1958 there were going to be elections in the local,
and following the nominations, and during the nominations, Mr. Wain-
wright and Mr. Barrett refused to give the membersh ip those who were
eligible to run for office. But after the nominations Mr. Wainwright
and Mr. Barrett ruled everybody ineligible to run for office except 53
members out of a 1,200 member local, and they were supported in that
by Mr. Hoffa and Mr. Harold Gibbons.

In addition, when Mr. Wainwright came in, Mr. Chairman, they had
a janitor who had been a former teamster member, who had driven a
truck, who had become disabled. He was being the janitor in the local



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18843

headquarters. Mr. Wainwright had him removed and placed as the
new janitor a man that had spent the previous 20 years in the peniten-
tiary in Leavenworth.

The Chairman. Was that a buddy of yours, and you were kind of
returning the favor of some kind ?

Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. So we have, Mr. Chairman, the three serious convic-
tions, a number of arrests, the fact that we have the testimony before
the House coimnittee that an employer had to pay him money in order
to avoid labor difficulty, we have him put in charge of a local, all the
opposition, or the vast majority of opposition to him being made in-
eligible by a ruling of the international president, Mr. Hoff a, and sup-
ported by Mr. Harold Gibbons, and we have the fact that he replaced
the janitor who had been working there for a number of years with a
man who had spent the previous 20 years in the penitentiary. Despite
this fact, and despite the evidence that we have had before the com-
mittee, this man still holds his position.

The Chairjsian. How long was Mr. Wainwright out of prison before
he was put in cliarge of this imion ?

Mr. Kennedy. Immediately after getting out of prison he went to
work for the Missouri-Kansas Conference of Teamsters. That was
1952, probably. He got out of the penitentiary on December 5, 1951.
He went to work for them in 1952.

This local was i^laced in trusteeship in 1954 because of the opposi-
tion to Mr. Gibbons, and Mr. Branch Wainwright and Mr. Barrett
then came in to run the union.

The Chairman. At least within 2 years after he got out of the peni-
tentiary he was placed in charge of running a union by the imposing
of a trusteeship on that union.

Mr. Kennedy. And immediately after getting out of the peniten-
tiary he is put on tlie payroll of the Teamsters.

The Chairman. I understand a fellow might be put on the payroll.
I think he has a right to work. I am not complaining about that.
I see nothing wrong with gi^^ng a man a job that gets out of prison.
I think maybe that should be done.

Mr. Kennedy. But he was an organizer.

The Chairman. That is a little different. It depends on the kind
of work.

Mr. Kennedy. He was placed on the payroll as an organizer for the
Missouri-Kansas conference.

The Chairman. It emphasizes again what we are seeking to do,
and what I think the Congress should do, to legislate in this field
to protect honest people against the imposition of unreformed crimi-
nals and ex-convicts. I don't think they should be subjected, the de-
cent people of America to the rule and domination of that type of
character.

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy.

Mr. K^ennedy. That is all, Mr. Chairman.

Senator Kennedy. I will ask what this gentleman's connection is
with Mr. Gibbons and Mr. Hoffa.

Mr. Kennedy. As I explained, he came to work first for the Mis-
souri-Kansas Conference of Teamsters, of which Mr. Gibbons was



18844 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

l^resiclent. Then he was placed in this nnion by Mr. Gibbons and ^Ir.
Hoffa to run it under a trusteeship.

Senator Kennedy. Is he still in that union ?
Mr, Kennedy. Yes.
Senator Kennedy. He is trustee?
Mr. Kennedy. No.

Mr. Gibbons, I believe, is trustee, but the trustees placed someone
in to run the unon for them. And Mr. Gibbons placed this man and
Mr. Barrett to run the union.

The Chairman. In other words, his actions are subject to the
direction of Mr. Gibbons. Is that correct ?
Mr. Kennedy. Yes.

Senator Kennedy. When Mr. Gibbons came before this committee,
was he asked about ]Mr. Wainwright's services, and, if so, what did
he say?

Mr. Kennedy. He said that he was unaware of all the convictions
of Branch Wainwright. He knew he had been convicted. He did not
know when, and he didn't know that he had been convicted on three
diiferent occasions. He said he would look into it.

Senator Kennedy. Did he know he had been paid by employers?
Mr. Kennedy. That was in the record of 1953. Just prior to the
time he was placed in charge of this local.

Senator Kennedy. Are you being paid by any employer now i
]Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe mj- answer may tend to incriminate me.

Senator Kennedy. In other words, Gibbons, Mr. Holla's most in-
timate associate, has taken no action on this matter. Has he ever in-
vestigated it?

Mr. Kennedy. I don't know. You might ask him.
Senator I^nnedy. Have you had a conversation since Mr. Gibbons
came before this committee and stated he was going to look into the
matter. Did he ever have a conversation with you about your
record ?

Mr. Wainwright. I respectfully decline to answer because I hon-
estly believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Senator Kennedy. I would like to ask Counsel if he knows if any
action has been taken by Mr. Hoffa against any of the people who
have come before us, who have taken the fifth amendment, smce he
came before the committee the last time and stated he was going to do
something about investigating these matters.

Mr. Kennedy. We don't know of any action he has taken in con-
nection with any of these cases.

I might say in connection with local 245, the monitors attempted
to send in Price- Waterhouse to make an audit of their books and the
officers refused to allow them to come in to review the books.

Senator Kennedy. In other words, there is no evidence before this
committee that Mr. Hoffa has taken action against any of these busi-
ness agents, representatives, and others, some of whom have been
convicted for taking employer payoffs, some of whom have been
convicted of selling out the interest of their members in return for
sweetheart contract operations, others who have been convicted of
narcotics, most of whom took the fifth amendment, and all this
morning, there is no evidence that Mr. Hoffa moved against any of
these people ?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18845

Mr. Kennedy. That is right. They have all appeared before this
committee in connection with betrayal of the union membership in one
of the methods you described. They have been involved in either
taking money from the union or making sweetheart contracts and
collusive deals with employers. It is not just a question of their
criminal record. It is a question that once they got control of the
union, they betrayed the members, and still nothing has been done.

The Chairman. All right.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. DeRoma.

The Chairman. Be sworn, please.

You do solemnly swear the evidence you shall give before this
Senate select conmiittee will be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing
but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. DeEoma. I do.

TESTIMONY OF HENRY BeROMA, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
H. CLIFFORD ALLDER

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your
business or occupation.

Mr. DeRo:ha. Henry DeRoma, 25 Highland Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y.

The Chahoian. I did not understand your full answer.

Mr. DeRoma. Henry DeRoma, 25 Highland Avenue, Yonkers, N. Y.

The Chairman. You did not give your occupation or business ?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Tv'hat you mean is you decline to answer that part
of the question. I asked you the question if you gave it. You did not ;
is that correct?

Mr. DeRoma. That is right.

The Chairman. All right. Let the record show Mr. Allder appears
as counsel for the witness.

Proceed.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, Mr. DeRoma has not appeared be-
fore the committee previously, but we have had considerable discus-
sion regarding his local, local 805 in New York, of which he is a trustee.

Is that right, Mr. DeRoma ?

Mr. DeRoma, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. That is a local that is run by Mr. Abe Gordon. Mr.
Abe Gordon is a close associate and friend of Mr. Hoila's. We have
had some testimony, although we are going to go into the matter in
greater detail, some testimony in connection with the misuse of pension
and welfare funds of the local.

Could you tell us anything about that, Mr. DeRoma ?

Mr. DeRoma, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman, Who is actually the trustee? Mr. Gordon or Mr.
DeRoma ?

Mr. Kennedy, This local is not under trusteeship but in the Team-
sters there are three trustees as well as four other officers. He is one of
the three trustees of this local.



18846 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

The Chairman. I misunderstood. The local is not in trusteeship,
but he is one of the trustees, officers, of the local ?

Mr. Ejennedy. That is correct.

Mr. DeRoma's background includes a conviction for murder, some
four arrests for narcotics and a conviction for narcotics.

Is that correct, Mr. DeRoma ?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Can you say whether you have reformed or not
without possible self-incrimination ?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. He is one of the seven officers of the local, Mr.
Chairman. He served penitentiary sentences for murder and for
the selling of heroin. He was born in Italy.

Is that correct ? In 1898 ?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us, Mr, DeRoma, how you came to
be a trustee of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters with that
background ?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. As a trustee, he supervises вАФ is that correct, Mr.
DeRoma, you are to supervise the use of union funds?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. Could you tell us what salary you receive ?

Mr. DeRoma. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly



Online LibraryUnited States. Congress. Senate. Select CommitteeInvestigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) → online text (page 7 of 38)