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United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 54) online

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continued in office since this committee exposed some wrongdoings,
and the same attorney in most of the cases represents them.

It seems to me that that indicates a pattern concerning the attitude
of the Teamster organization here in Washington toward these people.

Who do you receive your compensation from ? Each of these people
individually ?

Mr. Allder. Well, Senator, I hesitate to talk about anything con-
cerning a client. There is a relationship of attorney-client. When I
have been asked, I furnished the committee, when I was asked, to
Mr. Bellino, information. But I can't furnish any information to
the committee concerning that sacred relationship without the waiver
by the client. I don't have that privilege. It exists to him and him
alone. When that is w^aived I, of course, then have no privilege and I
would have to answer your questions. But until that is done, I can't
doit.

The Chairman. Let the Chair make this obseravtion.

The committee permits counsel to appear. It is not a ri^ht other
than as granted by the committee, by the rules of the committee.

Mr. Allder. I understand that, sir.

The Chairman. I think we could, and I think it is a proper question,
ask you whether you actually represent the individual witness for
whom you appear.

Mr. Allder. That is correct, sir.

The Chairman. You do ?

Mr. Allder. I do ; yes, sir.

The Chairman, The second question is whether you represent him
exclusively or if you also represent the union that he is a representative
of.

Mr. Allder. I would say this. Senator : Each witness I appear here
with — take this one as an example — I am representing him alone and
no one else.

The Chairman. And you are not here in the interest of the Team-
sters Union or any local constituent unit thereof ?

Mr. Allder. I am employed by him, and that is all.

The Chairman. Then the next question would be, to corroborate
and substantiate that, is : Are you expecting and do you get your fee
directly from him or do you get it from the union ?

Mr. Allder. I expect to get my fee directly from him. I haven't
received it vet.



18856 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Senator Kennedy, As long as we have that, could we ask when you
represented Mr, Smith before this committee some time ago whether
you got the fee from him ?

Mr. Alldee. I did not. This is the first time I represented Mr.
Smith.

Senator Kennedy. Let us take two or three of the other witnesses
you represented before. What about Mr. Filipoff ? Mr. Filipoff , the
previous time he appeared, did he pay the counsel fee, or the Team-
sters ?

Mr. Allder. I haven't been paid yet for the previous appearance.

Senator Kennedy. Did you send a bill to him ?

Mr. Alldee. Verbally I discussed the question of fee. No, I haven't
sent any bill.

Senator Kennedy. In order to simplify it, let me ask you : Have
you been compensated by the Teamsters International for any of the
people whom you represented before this committee ?

Mr. Alldee. Well, now, if you mean by Teamsters International, I
suppose you mean not locals or conferences, and so on. My answer to
that is "No."

Senator Kennedy. Let's say conferences.

Mr. Alldee. I have been paid by locals and I furnished that infor-
mation to the committee after having obtained a waiver by the client
concerning that matter. Offhand, I couldn't remember the details, but
I furnished the amounts, locals, and so on.

Senator Kennedy. You understand the point. I am trying to find
out whether the Teamster members are paying you or whether the
person involved is paying you out of his own funds.

Mr. Alldee. I understand that, Senator, and I think I answered.
I have been paid by some locals and I furnished a list of those to the
committee.

_ Senator Kennedy. And you have been paid in some cases by the man
himself without union funds ?

Mr. Alldee. That is correct.

The Chaieman. All right. Proceed.

Mr. I^NNEDY. Mr. Filipoff, you were former secretary-tmasurer of
local 208 in Los Angeles, Calif. There was an election that we went
into between Mr. Filipoff and Mr. Sidney Cohen. Mr. Sidney Cohen
won the election. He then was subjected to a period of harassment
for himself and for his wife, and finally he arranged to come back
here. Mr. Cohen met with IMr. Filipoff, as well as with IMr. Mike
Singer, who is one of Mr. Hofl'a's chief representatives in Los Angeles.
At that time Mr. Cohen had a meeting at the International Teamster
headquarters and agreed to resign from the position he liad been
elected to. He went back to Los Angeles and ultimately appeared be-
fore the committee and explained that the reason he desired to resign
was because of the threats that had been made against himself and his
wife.

We brought Mr. Filipoff before the committee and developed the
facts that he was in business with an employer out there, receiving
compensation, and a comparable income from the employer. We also
went into the election, what had happened in the election. Mr. Fili-
poff refused to answer our questions on the grounds of self-incrimina-
tion.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18857

Ultimately, Mr. Cohen, through a court case and other efforts, was
able to gain control of the local. Mr. Filipoff was out of a job, but
he was promoted by Mr. Hoffa, since his appearance before the com-
mittee, and made head of the Sears, Roebuck drive on tlie west coast.

Is that correct, Mr. Filipoff ?

Mr, Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't it correct that based on your appearance before
the committee, when you took the fifth amendment, these other details
regarding your activities had been developed, and the fact that you
had furnished, together with the international union, some $11,000
to Gus Brown, a kiiown Communist, who runs and operates an inde-
pendent union on the west coast, that this had all been developed?

You took the fifth amendment regarding these activities. Then
you went back to the west coast and Mr. Hoffa promoted you and
made you head of the Sears, Roebuck drive on the west coast; is that
correct ?

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. And you are now being paid out of international
funds ; is that not right ?

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. And the name of the company, Mr, Chairman, we
identified him with as being in business with, was the Portabel Con-
tainer Disposal Co. He was in business with an employer by the name
of Harry F. Levenson; it was a clear conflict of interest.

That testimony was placed in the record under oath.

The Chairman, What was it you stated about the Communist?

Mr. Kennedy. There was a man by the name of Gus Brown. Gus
Brown was expelled from organized labor because of Communist
affiliations.

He was a functionaiy in the Communist Party in California. He
was expelled from organized labor because of his Communist affiia-
tions. He organized an independent union. Mr. Filipoff' and Mr.
Harold Gibbons got together and when Mr. Gus Brown was attempt-
ing to organize a furniture company they financed his organizational
drive.

The money came originally from local 208, some $11,000, but that
local was then reimbursed by the international union. It went to
this knov/n Communist, laiow member of the Communist Party,

The Cpiairman. Did you take any part in that, Mr. Filipoff?

Mr. Filipoff. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. You wouldn't say whether you helped fuiance the
Communist effort to organize union members?

Mr, Filipoff, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Ciiairjman, Whatever action you took, is it known to Mr.
Hoffa?

Mr, Filipoff, I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.



18858 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

The Chairman. I don't want to reflect on liim. Is it a fact he
knew of all these activities before he promoted you and put you in
charge of this work out there ?

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. You don't thmk it would be any reflection, do you,
if you were hired to do an honest job ?

Mr. I'lLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answei- because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Do you have any concept of what is honest and
decent and proper?

Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Are there any further questions?

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, what we have developed, of course,
is that these people are individuals and alliances with people con-
victed of armed robbery^, murder, convicted of narcotics pushing, and
now, of course, the alliance money going with Communists, that noth-
ing has been done about any of these matters.

It would appear evident, as we have said before in this committee,
that Mr. Hoffa cannot do anything about any of this.

Is that correct?

]Mr. FiLiPOFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. He'is part and parcel of this operation. He can-
not and would not under any circumstances do anything about this
kind of an operation in the Teamst-ers Union.

Isn't that right, Mr. Filipoff ?

Mr. FiLiroFF. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Senator Kennedy. Isn't it a fact that Mr. Hoffa said on page 5224,
on August 23, 1957, when Senator Ives asked liim about some of the
situations in New York, he said :

I will tell you, Senator, if I become president of this international, I will
accept my responsibilities and deal with the individuals in such a way that
will not bring any harm to the labor movement * * *.

I recognize that responsibility, and the union will be run for the benefit of
the members, and it will be corrected where it needs correcting.

Mr. Hoffa came before this committee as far as 2 years ago, at
which time he committed himself to cleaning up the union.
Again, the chairman stated on 5222 :

Mr. Hoffa, you can't place the blame for all of this on Dave Beck.

Mr. Hoffa. If I had the responsibility, I would accept it.

The Chairman. You didn't have a responsibility to the union to try to keep it
clean and honorable and try to keep it from coming into disrepute?

Mr. Hoffa. Tes, sir. I accept that responsibility, and after hearing this com-
mittee operate I can make a positive statement on that question if you care to
have me make it.

It seemed to me that Mr. Hoffa made several statements as to what
he was going to do to clean up the union. I don't think there is any
question but what he has authority under tlie constitution. I would
like to ask if th.ere is anyone in the Team.ster organization, with the
exception of Mr. Beck — not even Mr. Beck — who has been removed
from the Teamster payroll or a position of influence in the Teamsters.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18859

A number have been removed. For instance, Frank Kierdorf was
burned to death. I believe there was another union official that went
to the penitentiary, Jerry Connelly, who is no longer a union official.
And there was Mr. Herman Kierdorf ; Mr. Hoff a stated that he asked
him to resign from the union.

I mioht say, as far as Mr. Herman Kierdorf is conoeriied, that ac-
cordinix to the records of the Teamsters he received $20,000 in sever-
ance pay wlien he resigned.

Mr. iloffa said also that Tony "Ducks" Corallo has resigned. We
iiad the testimony in connection with tliat today, wliere the two indi-
viduals replaced him immediately on the payroll aud. according to our
information, they are nothing but fronts for Tony "Ducks" Corallo.

Mr. Herman Kierdorf, I might add, has gone to the penitentiary
also.

I don't think beyond that, according to the information we have,
and according to the information that has been furnished to the com-
mittee by the Teamsters, there is anybody else against whom Mr.
Hoffa has taken any action.

Senator Kennedy. Isn't it a fact that in the case of Mr. Cohen, for
example, up in Philadelphia, Mr. Hoffa attended a banquet in his
honor even though he took the jSfth amendment as to what he had
done with over $300,000 of union funds ?

Mr. Ej:nnedy. That is correct.

The Chairman. Is there anything further of this witness ?

Mr. Kennedy. That is all.

The Chairman. Stand aside.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. AlReger.

The Chahiman. Mr. Reger, be sworn.

You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall give before this
Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing
but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Reger. I do.

TESTIMONY OF AL REGER, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL,
H. CLIFFORD ALLDER AND BERNARD ULANO

The CiiAHiMAN. State your name, your place of residence, and your
business or occupation.

Mr. Reger. Alfred Reger, 3555 Kings College Place, Bronx, N. Y.

The Chairman. Have you any business or occupation ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer may tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. You think it would ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. That is what I asked you. You honestly believe
it might tend to incriminate you ; is that correct ?

Mr. Reger. Yes.

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy.

Let the record show that Mr. Allder appears.

Mr. Allder. His local attorney is here, too, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. Will you identify yourself ?



18860 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. UiiANO. Bernard Ulano, 41 Broadway, New York City.

The Chairman. Proceed.

Mr. IvENNEDY. Mr. Reger is the secretary-treasurer of local 522 of
the Teamsters. It is one of the Teamsters Union that is controlled
and dominated by Tony "Ducks" Corallo and was identified as such
before our committee in 1957.

Although that fact was established, we put some wiretaps that
were legal at that time, we put them in the record and they show that
Mr. Al Reger was taking his instructions from Tony "Ducks" Corallo.
That is the second thing we established.

Also, Mr. Al Reger has been convicted of extortion, and he has
been sentenced to 5 to 10 years in Sing Sing Prison. I understand
it is on appeal at the present time. He still holds his union position.

Isn't that correct, Mr. Reger ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. Nothing has been done, once again, in the case of Al
Reger to remove him from his union position.

Senator Kennedy. Has the appeal been settled ?

Mr. Kennedy. It is still on appeal.

Isn't it correct, Mr. Reger, that you have been a member of the
Communist Party ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. Isn't is correct that you were on the advisory council
of the Daily Worker during the 1940's, and precinct director of the
Newark Communist Party ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. Kennedy. We identified as his close associates Johnny Dio-
guardi, Anthony "Tony Ducks" Corallo, Carmine Tramunti, Archie
Katz, and Milton Holt.

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Have you ever repudiated communism ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Do you now believe in communism as a philosophy ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Are you now a Communist ?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. Is there anything further?

Mr. Kennedy. That is all.

The Chairman. You may stand aside. Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Once again, Mr. Chairman, he still holds his union
position.

The Chairman. I have one other question. In this latest conviction
of yours, did the union pay the expenses of your defense?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

The Chairman. What do we have on that ?



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18861

Mr. Kennedy. We don't have that.

The Chairman. It seems to be the general pattern for the union,
the dues-paying members, to have to pay the burden of defending
these extortionists and other crimes committed by these folks.

You don't want to say wliether the union paid for your expenses
or not?

Mr. Reger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly
believe my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Senator Kennedy. May I ask if the local attorney represented him
in the criminal prosecution ?

Mr. Ulano. No ; I did not.

The Chairman. Is there anything further ?

Mr. Kennedy. That is all.

The Chairman. Stand aside.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Cou.ld he remain close by ?

The Chaieman. Yes.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Theodore Wilmot.

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall
give before this Senate select commitee shall be the truth, the whole
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. WiLMOT. I do.

TESTIMONY OF THEODOKE WILMOT

The Chairman. Please state your name, your place of residence, and
your business or occupation.

Mr. Wilmot. My name is Theodore Wilmot. I live at 195 Franklin
Street, Secaucus, N.J. My business is secretary-treasurer of local
300 of the International Brotherhood of Pulp, Sulphite & Paper Mill
Workers.

The Chairman. It is kind of refreshing to have a witness come up
and frankly state his business and occupation. It certainly demon-
strates that all miions are not under the dominance of officers who
have to take the fifth amendment when they are asked about their
transactions and their work for labor with respect to the union they
represent.

Thank you very much.

Do you have counsel ?

Mr. Wilmot. No, sir.

The Chairman. Do you waive counsel ?

Mr. Wilmot. I waive counsel.

The Chairman. Proceed.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Wilmot, you have been with that union for ap-
proximately 20 or 21 years ?

Mr. Wilmot. Right.

Mr. Kennedy. Around February of 1959 you received a telephone
call from Mike Peluso ?

Mr. Wilmot. Yes, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. I understand he was owner of the Union Salvage
Co.

Mr. Wilmot. That is right.

Mr. Kennedy. That was located at Plainfield, N.J.; is that right?

Mr. Wilmot. Yes, sir.



18862 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. Will you relate what he said to you at that time?

Mr. WiLMOT. He had left word at my office, I wasn't in the office
when the call was received, but there was a note left there for me, to
get in touch with him., that his plant was being organized by a Team-
sters local, and requested that I get in touch with him, which I did.

In fact, I went to his plant and he told me that — well, he showed me
a stipulation that was to be signed by him, by the Teamsters local,
and he asked me what I could do to help him. In my endeavor to get
the matter straightened out, I told him that I would try and seek
jurisdiction over his employees because they were members or should
be members of our international unito.

When I found out the local number, which was 522, 1 believe, if my
memory serves me right, in Newark, N.J., I called there and was put
in contact with Mr. Reger.

The Chairman. That is the witness who just preceded you on the
stand ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Sir ?

The Chairman. Mr. Reger is the witness who just preceded you on
the stand ; that is who you are talking about ?

Mr. WiLMOT. I understand that.

The Chairman. I wanted the record to show it. Proceed.

Mr. Kennedy. What conversations did you have with Mr. Reger?

Mr. WiLMOT. About taking over the jurisdiction of the plant.

Mr. IvENNEDY. Relate to the committee, please. Relate the con-
versation that you had.

Mr. WiLMOT. Well, when I had asked him for recognition, there
was a couple of problems that he had to have worked out.

Mr. Kennedy. What happened ? Will you continue ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Well, he had a problem of losing face with the men
whom he had solicited into his union.

Mr. Kennedy. Did he ultimately tell you that you would have to
pay some money in order to gain recognition ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Well, you have to have so-called expense money.

Mr. KJENNEDY. How much did that amount to ? Subsequently did
he relate to you how much that would amount to ?

Mr. WiLMOT. The way I understood, it was to be $90 a man.

Mr. Kennedy. How much would that amount to altogether?

Mr. WiLMOT. Maybe $1,300; somewhere around there.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Reger asked for that money ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Did he ask me for that money ? He asked me to get
in touch with Mr. Peluso.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Peluso was to pay that money, $1,300 ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Apparently.

Mr. Kennedy. Is that what he said to you ?

Mr. WiLMOT. He asked me to call him and get in touch with him
and tell him that is what he wanted.

Mr. Kennedy. What did you tell Mr. Reger ?

Mr. WiLMOT. I thought it was exorbitant. I thought it was a shake-
down. However, as embarrassed as I was, I would call Mr. Peluso
and then I would convey my message back to Mr. Reger, whatever
Mr. Peluso said.

I did that, and Mr. Peluso said that he definitely would not pay.
Then I told him if he was prepared for a strike, because that would



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 18863

be the natural thing to happen if the man didn't meet Mr. Reger's
demands. I understand at a later date there was a strike in the plant.

Mr. Kennedy. And was there ultimately an election ?

Mr. WiLMOT. So I understand. There was an election and the
Teamsters lost the election.

Mr. Kennedy. But he approached you, Mr. Reger said that he
would call off his organizational drive if you could obtain some $1,300
from the employer ; is that correct ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Approximately that much. At $90 a man, however
many men were employed.

Mr. Kennedy. You told him you thought it was a shakedown at
that time?

Mr. WiLMOT. I thought it was exorbitant.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you tell him it was a shakedown?

Mr. WiLMOT. I believe I told him that, too.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever report that to any Government indi-
vidual ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Did I ever report it? I gave a sworn statement ta
your committee members or attorney.

Mr. Kennedy. Prior to that?

Mr. WiLMOT. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. If you thought it was a shakedown, why didn't you
report it ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Because I wanted to get away from it and get out of
the whole mess.

Mr. Kennedy. Did you ever try to organize the plant yourself ?

Mr. WiLMOT. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. You never tried?

Mr. WiLMOT. No, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. If that plant was in your jurisdiction, why didn't
you try to organize ?

Mr. WiLMOT. I didn't know it was there.

Mr. Kennedy. After you found out it was there, why didn't you
organize it?

Mr. WiLMOT. Because it was too late ; it was si^ed up.

Mr. I^NNEDY. Why didn't you try to organize it then, when you
saw him?

Mr. WiLMOT. It was being organized by a union. There was a
imion involved.

Mr. Kennedy. You said he was involved in an extortion or a shake-
down. Why didn't you go down and try to organize it yourself ?

Mr. WiLMOT. Well, that isn't the way it is done.

Mr. I^nnedy. That is what we are beginning to find out. That is
all, Mr. Chairman.

The Chairman. Are there any other questions?

If not, thank you very much.

Call the next witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Reger, would you return to the stand, please ?

TESTIMONY OF AL REGER, ACCOMPANIED BY COUNSEL, H. CLIP-
FORD ALLLER AND BERNARD ULANO— Resumed

Mr. Kennedy. Would you relate to the committee what happened
in connection with this organizational drive?

36751— r59—pt. 54 6



18864 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Keger. I respectfully decline to answer because I honestly be-
lieve my answer might tend to incriminate me.

Mr. E^NNEDY, So, Mr. Chairman, we have this inf oraiation in 1957



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