United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee.

Investigation of improper activities in the labor or management field. Hearings before the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management Field (Volume pt. 46) online

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INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD



HEARINGS

BEFOHB THE

SELECT COMMITTEE

ON IMPEOPER ACTIYITIES IN THE

LABOE OR MANAGEMENT FIELD

EIGHTY-FIFTH CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION
AND

EIGHTY-SIXTH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

PURSUANT TO SENATE RESOLUTIONS 74 AND 221, 85TH CONGRESS
AND SENATE RESOLUTION 44, 86TH CONGRESS



DECEMBER 4 AND 9, 1S58; FEBRUARY 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, AND 18, 1959



PART 46



Printed for the use of the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the
Labor or Management Field




INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD



HEARINGS

( ^ i / ^ BEFORE THE

'^J^^ SELECT COMMITTEE
ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE
LABOR OR MANAGEMENT FIELD

EIGHTY-FIFTH CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION
AND

EIGHTY-SIXTH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

PURSUANT TO SENATE RESOLUTIONS 74 AND 221, 85TH CONGRESS
AND SENATE RESOLUTION 44, 86TH CONGRESS



DECEMBER 4 AND 9, 1958; FEBRUARY 10, 11, 12, 13, 17, AND 18, 1959



PART 46



Printed for the use of the Select Committee on Improper Activities in the
Labor or Management Field




UNITED STATES
GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
36751 WASHINGTON : 1959



Boston Public Library
Superintendent of Documenta

IVIAY 1 1 ]%3
DEPOSITORY



SELECT COMMITTEE ON IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR OR

MANAGEMENT FIELD

JOHN L. McCLELLAN, Arkansas, Chairman
KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota, Vice Chairman
JOHN F. KENNEDY, Massachusetts BARRY OOLDWATER, Arizona

SAM J. ERVIN, Jr., North Carolina CARL T. CURTIS, Nebraska

FRANK CHURCH, Idaho HOMER E. CAPEHART, Indiana

Robert F. Kennedy, Chief Counsel
Ruth Young Watt, Chief Clerk

It



CONTENTS



The Coin-Operated Amusement and Vending Machine Industry

Page

Appendix 1 6925

Testimony of —

Amalfitano, John Joseph 16852

Bernofr, Charles 16887, 10920

Blatt, Theodore... 16646

Bellino, Carmine S... 16488

Blumet ti, Joseph 1 650 1

Cammarata, Frank 16467

Caggiano, James 16700, 1 671 6

Carelly, Larry 16484

Catena, Gerardo Vito 16568

Caruso, John R 16846, 1 6851

Cofini, Robert J 16684, 16714

Cohen, Al 16798

Corrigan, Joseph 16642, 16674, 16822

Constandy, John P 16557, 16749, 16764, 16803, 16847, 16880

DeGrandis, Joseph 16877, 16884

Denver, Albert S 16746, 16750

Gallo, Joseph . 16830, 16841

Gallo, Lawrence 16836, 16841

Genove.se, J, Michael 16597

Gilbert, Abraham 10720

Goldbert, Mrs. Svlvia 16800, 16802

Gottlieb, Benjamin 16667, 16675

Green, Milton 16660

Guerci, Charles 16783

Hackmeyer, Capt. Richard J 16576

Hammergren, Milton J 16530

lo vine, Joseph A 1 6868

Jacot ), Eugene 1 6858

Jacob, Herbert 1 6858

Javors, Sol 10806

Jordan, Cvril T 16838

Kaplan, Arthur G 16470, 16513, 16594

Kasper, Eli 16686

Kearney, Joseph A 16564

Kelly, James P 16802

King, Rufus 16549

Kolibash, George 16728

LaRocco, Joseph 16763, 16768

Lichtman, Charles 16625, 16626, 16643

May, Walter R 16625, 16801

McCann, James G 16775

Mishel, Irving 16894, 16905, 16907

Mooney, Lt. James S 16679

Morris, Harold 1 6768

Nelson, Capt. Walter G 16603

O'Brien, Thomas 16904, 16909

Patriarca, Ravmond 16608, 16618

Parker, Sonny 10793

Pearl, Mortimer B 16786

Salardino, Joseph 16599

Sammartino, Joseph 1 6484

Saul, Sidnev 16817

Vladeck, Stephen C 16734

Vitale, John 16585

Willse. Sherman S 16889, 16905

Zito, Frank 16588, 16596

ni



IV CONTENTS

EXHIBITS

Introduced Appears
on page on page

1. Statement to the employer with respect to amount of dues

that should be paid 16485 (*)

2. Article in the Youngstown Vindicator, December 8, 1958.. 16495 (*)

3. Transcript of proceedings before Hon. James C. Connell,

judge, in the District Court of the United States for the

Northern District of Ohio, Eastern Division, Thursday,

November 13, 1958 16496 (*)

4 Chart, pattern of national distribution in the coin machine

industry 16516 16925

4A Chart, pattern of local distribution in the coin machine

industry 16518 16926

4B Chart showing eflfect of operators' association on local

■ distribution 16520 16927

4C Chart showing effect of association-union collusion on local

distribution 16524 16928

5 A. Photograph of Sammy Tocco and Angelo Meli 16542 (*)

53 Photograph of Sammy Tocco and Angelo Meli pitching

horseshoes 16543 (*)

5C. Photograph of the Distributors Club 16543 (*)

5D. Photograph of Al Mendes and William Bufalino 16543 (*)

6E'. Photograph of Al Mendes and William Bufalino 16543 (*)

6. Appendices to statement of Rufus King 16550 (*)

7. Letter dated July 28, 1948, addressed to A.M.I. Phono-

graphs, Chicago, 111., from Frank Zito, Modern Distribut-
ing Co. 16592 16929

7A. Letter dated July 31, 1948, addressed to Franlc Zito, Modern
Distributing Co., from Michael Spagnola, Automatic
Phonograph Distributing Co 16594 16930

7B. Letter dated September 15, 1948, addressed to Frank Zito,
Modern Distributing Co., Springfield, 111., from Michael
Spagnola, Automatic Phonograph Distributing Co 16594 16931

8. Letter dated February 26, 1951 addressed to W. S. Divin-

nell, Minneapolis Securities Corp., from Michael Spag-
nola, Automatic Phonograph Distributing Co 16595 16932

9. List of individuals associated with the New York phase of -,

the select committee's investigation, together with New

York unions and associations 16626 (*)

10. Check No. 1147, dated January 11, 1952, payable to United
Coin Machine Union in the amount of $2,000, drawn by
local 222 16633 16933

11 Photograph of Lawrence Centore, known as "Blackie,"

bearing the number 72059, New York City Police 16642 (*)

llA. Police record of Lawrence Centore. 16643 (*)

12. Affidavit of Jack Altman 16645 (*)

13. Photograph of Ernest Rupolo, known as "Ernie the Hawk"

bearing the number 77947, New York City Police 16674 (*)

13A Criminal record of Ernest Rupolo, alias "Ernie the Hawk". 16674 (*)

14! Charter for Local Union No. 465 dated June 25, 1951 16707 (*)

15, Blank contract form for agreement between International
Union of Electrical, Radio, & Machine Workers, Local

465 and members of the Game Association 16710 (*)

16A-C. Complaint slips 16723 (*)

16D-F. Requests for information as to the disposition of the

cases mentioned in the complaint slips 16725 (*)

17. Statement of Music Operators of New York, Inc., sub-
mitted to the Senate Select Committee on Improper

Activities in the Labor or Management Field 16746 (*)

18 Contract between Music Operators of New York, Inc., and

Local 1690, RCIA 16750 (*)

19A. Letter dated September 10, 1956, addressed to "Dear Joe,"

signed by Al Cohen 10766 (*)

19B. Letter dated September 12, 1956, addressed to Al Cohen,

signed by Joseph Lallocco 16766 (*)



•May be found in the flies of the select committee.



CONTENTS



EXHIBITS— Continued

Introduced Appears
on page on page

19C. Charter issued to Electrical Equipment and Fabrication

Employees Union, Local 531, dated September 20, 1958. 1G766 (*)

20. Photograph of Fred GiovanoUi bearing the number 316100,

New York City Police 16788 (*)

21. Photof^raph of the office .store headquarters of Local 531 16792 (*)

22. Cards issued to Sonnv Parker for picketing purposes 16796 (*)

23. Letter dated August "14, 1957, addressed to Mr. Al Cohen,

Local 531 UIU, signed by Joseph LaRocco, United In-
dustrial Unions 16802 16934

24. Document, Supreme Court of the State of New York,

opinion in Music Operators of New York, Inc., v. Pearl,

dated October 7, 1957 16806 (*)

25. Petition dated August 31, 1950, addressed to William Evans,

president, Federated Service Workers Union 16811 (*)

26. Minutes of a meeting at Foffe's Restaurant, dated Septem-

ber 24, 1957, and signed by Sol Javors 16812 16935

27. Letter dated January 2, 1957 to Federated Service Workers

Union, signed by Albert Gallo 16814 (*)

28. Letter dated October 16, 1957, addressed to Federated

Services Workers Union and signed by Biagio Latriano._ 16815 (*)

29. Photograph of Ernest Filocomo, bearing the number 223684,

New York City Police 16822 (*)

29A. New York Citv Police Department criminal record of

Ernest Filocomo 16823 (*)

30. Photograph of Charles Panarella, bearing the number

191797, New York City Police 16826 (*)

30A. Photograph of Anthony Tuzio, bearing the number 72217,

New York City PoHce 16826 (*)

30A-1. New York City Police Department criminal record of

Charles Panarella 16827 (*)

30A-2. New York City Police Department criminal record of

Anthony Tuzio 16827 (*)

31. Photograph of Biagio Latriano 16854 (*)

31A. Photograph of Biagio Latriano lying dead in front of an

apartment house 16854 (*)

32. Charter from Federated Service Workers Union of America

Cigarette and Coin Vending Machine Employees Union,

Local 19 16856 (*)

33. Photograph of a picket in front of a restaurant 16862 (*)

34. Agreement between Nu-Way Phono and Caruso's Restau-

rant, dated July 13, 1956 16863 (*)

34A. Rush order, Economy Vending Service, Inc., for a new

Wurlitzer outfit 16864 (*)

34B. Rush order, Economy Vending Service, Inc., for a Smoke-
shop cigarette machine 16864 (*)

35. Certified copj' of certificate of incorporation of United Coin

Machine Operators of New York, Inc., dated January 17,

1958 16866 (*)

35A. A notice to "Fellow Operators" on United Coin Machine
Operators of New York, Inc., letterhead, dated January
27, 1958 16866 (*)

36. Minutes of United Coin Machine Operators meetings dated

January 29, 30, February 18, 28, and March 12, 1958-. 16866 (*)

37. Check dated March 20, 1958, payable to Station M, in the

amount of $175, drawn by United Coin Machine Opera-
tors of New York 16867 16936

37A. Request for information on Albert Gallo, made by Robert J.

Cofini 16867 16937

37B. Calling card. Station "M" Inc., Peter M. Margules 16867 16938

37C. Invoice on the Station M blank, dated March 1, 1958, for
repairs on a 1956 Buick Roadmaster amounting to a total
of $376.02 16867 (*)

38. Labels, vending machines. Local 266, Teamsters, for the

year 1958 16880 (*)

•May be found in the flies of the select committee.



VI



CONTENTS



EXHIBITS— Continued

Introduced Appears
on page on page

39. Minutes of meeting of local 266, dated December 5, 1957,

held at 799 Coney Island Avenue, Brooklyn 16880 (*)

39 A. Receipt for the purchase of a ring binder and 100 sheets of
paper for a total of $2, dated May 15, 1958, marked "'Paid"
by the Novik Press, Inc 16880 (*)

40. Contract dated January 28, 1958, between United Coin

Machine Operators of New York, Inc., and the Auto-
matic Coin Vending Machine Employees Union, Lo-
cal 266 16884 (*)

41. Contract dated May 15, 1958, between Associated Amuse-

ment Machine Operators of New York, Inc., and the
Automatic Coin Amusement Machine Emuloyees Local
Union No. 266, I. B.T 16884 (*)

42. List of individuals mentioned in hearings 16889 (*)

43. A group of slips for repayment of loans 16918 (*)

43A. Slips for repayment of loans in bulk 16919 (*)

44 A. Slip in the name of John Bananas, January 3, 1949, showing

number of payments at different times 16919 (*)

44B. Slip in the name of Little Harry showing number of payments

at different times 16919 (*)

44C. Slip in the name of Cannon Trucking Co. showing number

of payments at different times 16919 (*)

45. Letter on Regal Music Co., Inc., letterhead, dated December

28, 1950, addressed to "Dear Jay," re: "Our resolutions

for the coming year 1951" 16921 (*)

46. Letter dated September 2, 1949, addressed to Irving Mishel

signed "C. B.," Admu-al Trading Corp 16922 16939

Proceedings of —

December 4, 1958 16467

December 8, 1958 16483

February 10, 1959 16511

February 11, 1959 16585

February 12, 1959 16667

February 13, 1959 16745

February 17, 1959 16817

February 18, 1959 _ 16887



•May be found in the flies of the select committee.



INVESTIGATION OF IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE
LABOR OR 3IANAGEMENT FIELD



THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1958

U.S. Senate,
Select Committee on Improper Activities

IN THE Labor or Management Field,

Washington^ D.O.

The select committee met at 10 a.m., pursuant to Senate Resolution
221, agreed to Januaiy 29, 1958, in the caucus room. Senate Office
Building, Senator John L. McClellan, chairman of the select com-
mittee, presiding.

Present: Senators John L. McClellan, Democrat, Arkansas, and
John F. Kennedy, Democrat, Massachusetts.

Also present : Kobert F. Kennedy, chief counsel ; Jerome S. Adler-
man, assistant chief counsel; Arthur G. Kaplan, assistant counsel;
Ruth Y. Watt, chief clerk.

The Chairman. The committee will come to order.

(Members of the select committee present at the convening of the
session were Senators McClellan and Kennedy.)

The Chairman. Call your first witness.

Mr. Kennedy. Frank Cammarata.

The Chairman. Will you be sworn ? You do solemnly swear that
the evidence you shall give before this Senate select committee shall
be the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you
God?

Mr. Cammarata. I do.

TESTIMONY OF FRANK CAMMARATA

The Chairman. The Chair will make this brief statement. This
testimony will be related to a subject matter that will be involved in the
next series of committee hearings as now planned. This witness would
not be available at a later date, and for that reason we are taking
his testimony at this time. Further explanation of it will be made
possibly at the conclusion of his testimony.

State your name, your place of residence, and your business or
occupation, please, sir.

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer on the ground

The Chairman. Will you pull the microphone in front of you,
please ? It is difficult to hear.

Mr. Cammar^vta. I refuse to answer on the gi-ound I might in-
criminate myself.

The Chairmx\.n. What is your name ?

]Mr. Cammarata. Frank Cammarata.

16467



16468 IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

The Chaieman. Thank you. Where do you live ?

Mr. Cammailvta. I refuse to answer.

The Chairman. You are ordered and directed to answer the ques-
tion . Where do you li ve ?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.

The Chairman. Where is it?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.

The Chairman. Do you wisli counsel? Do you desire to have an
attorney present to represent you when you testify ? Will you speak
up ? Do you ?

Again I ask you, do you desire counsel to represent you?

Mr. Cammarata. I have no counsel.

The Chairman. That was not the question. Have you undertaken
to arrange for counsel since you were notified or subpenaed to be
before the committee ?

Are you shaking your head, or what are you doing ?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer any questions.

The Chairman. The witness refuses to answer the question.

Mr. Cammarata. On the ground it might incriminate myself.

The Chairman. All right. The question is, did you desire counsel,
and your answer to that, as I understand, is you refuse to answer on
the ground it might tend to incriminate you ; is that correct ?

Mr. Cammarata. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. That is correct, then. All right, the Chair asks
you then, have you undertaken to arrange for counsel since you were
subpenaed to be before this committee ?

Mr. Cammarata. I cannot afford to have any coimsel.

The Chairman. You can't afford to have any counsel?

What is the date of the subpena? Let the subpena served on the
witness be placed in the record at this point, with the return thereon.

(The subpena referred to follows :)

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Congress of the United States

To Frank Cammarata, Detroit, Michigan, Greeting:

Pursuant to lawful authority, you are hereby commanded to appear before
the Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor or Management
Field of the Senate of the United States, on December 1, 1958, at 10 a.m., at
their committee room, 101 Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C., then and
there to testify what you may know relative to the subject matters under
consideration by said committee.

Hereof fail not, as you will answer your default under the pains and
penalties in such cases made and provided.

To Edward M. Jones, to serve and return.

Given under my hand, by order of the committee, this IHth day of November,
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and fifty-eight.

(Signed) John L. McClellan,
Chairman, Senate Select Committee on Improper Activities in the Labor
or Management Field.

(Service:)

November 24, 1958.
I made service of the within subpena by personal service the within-named
Frank Cammarata, at 3770 East Jefferson, Detroit, Mich. (Office of the District
Director Walter A. Sahli) Immigration and Naturalization Service, at 3 p.m., on
the 24th day of November 1958.

(Signed) Edward M. Jones.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16469

The Chairman. Why can't you aflord to have any counsel ?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.

The Chairman. Let the record so sliow. Then we will proceed.

What is your occupation or business?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.

The Chairman. You are ordered and directed to answer the
question.

Mr. Cammar.\ta. I might incriminate myself.

The Chairman. I didn't understand you. Wiat is your occupa-
tion or business ?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer on the ground that I might in-
criminate myself.

The Chairman. On the ground you might incriminate yourself?
I am trying to be helpful, and I want to get the record clear.

Mr. Cammarata. I can't think of the English.

The Chairman. That is all right. The Chair is trying to help you
make your statement as you want to make it. I am not trying to trip
you. I am trying to make the record clear.

As I understand you, you refuse to answer the question as to your
business or occupation on the ground that it might tend to incriminate
you.

Mr. Cammarata. Under the fifth amendment.

The Chairman. And the fifth amendment ?

Mr. Cammarata. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. All right, we have them both in there now, if there
is any difference.

Proceed, Mr. Kennedy.

Mr, Kennedy. What has been your source of income, Mr. Cam-
marata, over the period of the past 4 years ?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.

Mr. Kennedy. On what grounds ?

Mr. Cammarata. It might incriminate myself, under the fifth
amendment.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Cammarata, you have been in this country at
least since 1922, because you were arrested for armed robbery in 1922
in Detroit, Mich. I have had a conversation with you downstairs in
which you understood me very well, and your accent was much better.
You hardly had any accent at that time.

Now, could you tell us why you are not able to understand these
questions, and why you have such an accent when you are appearing
before this committee?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer on the ground of the fifth
amendment.

Mr. Kennedy. It is all an act you are putting on, is it not, Mr.
Cammarata?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.

Mr. Kennedy. On what ground ?

Mr. Cammarata. On the ground it might incriminate myself under
the fifth amendment.

Mr. Kennedy. As far as not being able to afford an attorney, you
have plenty of money, do you not, Mr. Cammarata ?

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer.



16470 IMPROPER ACTrV'ITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD

Mr. Kennedy. You built a house for yourself out in Ohio in 1954
durino- the period of time you yourself were in Jackson State Peniten-
tiary in Michigan. • i . •

Mr. Cammaii.\ta. I refuse to answer on the ground it might in-
criminate myself . ^^^.^r T-. J j-^U

Mr. Kennedy. And then you bought a brandnew 1957 h orcl at the
end of 1957, while you were in the Jackson State Penitentiary. Where
did you get the money for that ? • • v

Mr. Cammarata. I refuse to answer on the ground that it might
incriminate myself. . .

Mr. Kj:nnedy. Mr. Chairman, as you pointed out at the beginning,
this witness is being called in connection with the jukebox operation
and vending machines, and as he is not giving us too much informa-
tion, I would like to call a member of the staff to give a little of Mr.
Cammarata's background, and his connections with the vending ma-
chine operation, and then perhaps we can predicate some questions
based on that.

The Chairman. All right, come around.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Kaplan.

The Chairman. You do solemnly swear that the evidence you shall
give before this Senate select committee shall be the truth, the whole
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God ?

Mr. Kaplan. I do.

TESTIMONY OF ARTHUR G. KAPLAN

The Chairman. State your name, your place of residence, and your
present employment.

Mr. Kaplan. My name is Arthur Kaplan. I reside in Portland,
Oreg., and I am an assistant counsel to this committee.

The Chairman. Have you made an investigation and participated
in an investigation of the jukebox and vending machine industry ?

Mr. Kaplan. Yes, sir ; I have.

The Chairman. In the course of that investigation, have you con-
tacted this witness, Mr. Cammarata ?

Mr. Kaplan. Yes, sir ; we have.

The Chairman. Have you made other investigations with respect
to his participation in the operation, directly or indirectly, of the in-
dustry of jukeboxes and vending machines ?

Mr. KJ^PLAN. Yes, sir ; we have.

The Chairman. And also with respect to the infiltration of that
industry by elements that operated in an improper mamier ?

Mr. Kaplan. Yes, sir.

The Chairman. In the course of that investigation, have you also
found some elements of labor or labor representatives that have par-
ticipated in the organization or operation of that industry in certain
areas ?

Mr. Kaplan. Very clearly, sir, yes.

The Chairman. All right, Mr. Kennedy, proceed.

Mr. Kennedy. Mr. Chairman, Mr. Kaplan will testify just on Mr.
Frank Cammarata. When we later get into this investigation, he
will have more detailed information.

The Chairman. The Chair was just layino^ a background for the
interrogation of Mr. Kaplan, and also the witness, Mr. Cammarata.



IMPROPER ACTIVITIES IN THE LABOR FIELD 16471

Mr. KJENNEDY. We will go into more detail on the operation of the
industry.

But now, Mr. Kaplan, would you give us the information that you
have regarding Mr. Cammarata's association with the coin-operated
machines.

Mr. IvAPLAN. Yes, sir. If I mi^ht just sketch a little of the back-
ground — while we were investigating in Detroit, we discovered that
there, as in some other places, certain distributors of jukeboxes were
having a great deal of trouble in selling their machines.

The Chairman. That is, the manufacturer or the distributor of
the boxes was having trouble making sales ?

Mr. Kaplan. Yes, sir, the distributor of the box, who had the
franchise for the Detroit area. The same distributor also had the
franchise for the Ohio area.

Mr. Kennedy. "VVliat was the name of this ?

Mr. Kaplan. Music Systems, Inc.

Mr. Kennedy. What kind of boxes did they distribute ?

Mr. IvAPLAN. They were distributing the Seeberg phonograph;
coin-operated phonograph. This took place at a time when Seeberg
recently put out a model that was quite radical in the industry be-
cause it had a 100-record machine, which was a substantial departure,
and even from the fact this would have been a more attractive model
was the fact that the company was just selling nothing above and be-
yond any normal degree of competition with anybody else.

In rmmin^ this down, we found that this was because one of the
competing distributors, a franchise distributor for another brand of
jukebox seemed to be favored, and we found that the union in De-
troit had told many of the operators who would buy these boxes from
the Music Systems distributor, that they should not buy these music
boxes.

The Chairman. Wliat union is that ?

Mr. Kaplan. That was local 985 of the Teamsters, sir.

Mr. Kennedy. Headed by whom at that time ?

Mr. Kaplan. William Bufalino was actually the business manager
at the time, and Jimmy James, who was also before the committee,
was still the titular president, but had no active direction of it for
quite a period of tme.

JMr. Kennedy. What was the name of the company that the Team-
sters were favoring ?

Mr. Kaplan. They were favoring the Wurlitzer distributor, which
at that time was the Angott Distributing Co.

Mr. Kennedy. Where is that ?

Mr. I^PLAN. In Detroit, Mich.

Mr. Kennedy. All right. Will you continue.

Mr. Kaplan. We found that in an effort to break this blockade of
new machines, that the Music Systems, Inc., attempted to subsidize a
competing union, so that if they put out their own operation or whip
company in order to force customers to buy just because they had then



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