United States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign Commerce.

Consular reports, Issues 188-191 online

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Following are the special publications issued by the Bureau prior to 1 890:

Labor in Europe, 1878, one volume; Labor in Foreign Countries, 1884, three volumes;
Commerce of the World and the Share of the United States Therein, 1879; Commerce of the
World and the Share of the United States Therein, 1880-81 ; Declared Exports for the United
States, First and SJecond Quarters, 1883; Declared Exports for the United States, Third and
Fourth Quarters, 1883. Cholera in Europe in 1884, "885; Trade Guilds of Europe, 1885;
The Licorice Plant, 1885; Forestry in Europe, 1887; Emigration and Immigration, 1885-86
(a portion of this work was published as Consular Reports No. 76, for the month of April,
1887); Rice Pounding in Kurojie, 1887; Sugar of Milk, 1887; Wool Scouring in Belgium,
1887; Cattle and Dairy Farming in Foreign Countries, i888 (issued first in one volume, after-
wards in two volumes) ; Technical Education in £urq>e, 1888 ; Tari& of Central America and
the British West Indies, 1890.

The editions of all these publications except Tariffs of Central America, etc., are exhausted
and the Department is, therefore, unable to supply copies.

Information relating to special subjects — secured by circulars addressed to. consular
officers — increased to such an extent that, m 1890, the Department decided to publish such
reports in separate form, to be entitled Special Consular Reports. There are now the
following Special Consular Reports:

, Voi. I (tSgoV. — Cotton Textiles in Foreign Countries, Files in Spanish America, Carpet
Manufacture in Foreign Countries, Malt and Beer in Spanish America, and Fruit Culture in
Foreign Countries.

Vol. 2 (fSgi). — Refrigerators and Food Preservation in Foreign Countries, European
Emigration, Olive Culture in the Alpes Maritimes, and Beet Sugar Industry and Flax Culti-
vation in Foreign Countries.

Vo/.j (i8gi). — Streets and Highwajrs in Foreign Countries.

Vo/. 4 \i8g2\. — Port Regulations in Foreign C^ntries.

VoL^ \t8g2). — Canals and Irrigation in Foreign Countries.

Vol, 6 (iSgs). — Coal and Coal Consumption in Spanish America, Gas in Foreign Coun-
tries, and India Rubber.

Vol. 7 (i8g2\. — The Stave Trade in Foreign Countries and Tariffs of Foreign Countries.

Vol. 8 ItSgj). — Fire and Building Regulations in Foreign Countries.

Vol. g \18g2 ami i8gj). — Australian Sheep and Wool, and Vagrancy and Public Charities
in Foreign Countries.

Vol. 10 {i8^4y — Lead and Zinc Mining in Foreign Countries and Extension of Markets
for American Plour.

Vol, II (i8g4). — American Lumber in Poreign Markets.

Vol. 12 {i8gs)' — Highways of Commerce.

Of these Special Consular Reports, Cotton Textiles in Foreign Countries, Files in
Spanish America, Malt and Beer in Spanish America, Streets and Highways in Foreign
Countries, Canals and Irrigation, and Fire and Building Regulations are exhausted and no
copies can be supplied by the Department.

Of the monthly Consular Reports, many numbers are exhausted or so reduced that the
Department is unable to accede to requests for copies. Of the publications of the Bureau
availablo for distribution, copies are mailed to applicants without charge. In view of the
scarcity of certain numbers, the Bureau will be grateful for the return of any copies of
the monthly or special reports which recipients do not care to retain. Upon notification
of willingness to return such copies, the Department will forward franking labels to be used
in lieu of postage in the United States, Canada, the Hawaiian Islands, and Mexico.

Persons receiving Consular Reports regularly, who change their addresses, should give
the old as well as the new address in notifying the Bureau of the fact.

In order to prevent confusion with other Department bureaus, all communications relating
to consular reports should be carefully addressed, ** Chief, Bureau of Statisdcs, Department of
State, Washington, U. S. A."



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CONTENTS.



III. — Depression in Sugar Industry of Guadeloupe. ) 371

IV. — Coffee Crop of Guadeloupe™ j 372



Page.

I. — Explanatory Note. xv

II. — Production of Sugar in the Argentine Republic Buchanan 369

}

V. — Colombia; Region of the Magdalena; Trade of Bar - \

RANquilijV Ksidlake 372

VI. — Trade of Barranquilla in 1895 ) 380

VII. — Peru and the Peruvian Corporation .Jastremski 381

VIII. — Brazil: Minerals, Mining, etc., of the State of TiKHiA^AfcDaniei 384
IX. — Mexico: Amendment to the Constitution; Financial Changes,

Industrial Conditions, etc 387

(Substitute, or Ad Interiin, President, 387 — Abolition of Interstate
Tariffs of Mexico, 390 — Supplementary Decrees, 390 — Conver-
sion of the Mexican National Debt, 393 — New Banking Law
of Mexico, 395 — Manufacture of Pulque in Mexico, 396 — Orange
Crop of Mexico, 404 — Oranges and lemons in Sonora, 405 —
language as a Factor of Mexican Trade, 406 — Perfilado, or
Drawn Needlework, in Mexico, 408— Mormon Colonists in
Mexico, 409 — Beet Sugar in Mexico, 410.)
X. — Resources and Industrial Conditions in Nicaragua... ] 410

XI. — Market for United States Goods in Nicaragua 423

XII. — Cost of Goods Delivered in Nicaragua 451

XIII. — Port of San Jitan and the San Juan River ^ W Ham 461

XIV. — The Port of Blukfields 464

XV. — Steamboat Service in Nicaragua 465

XVI. — Market. FOR Machinery and Bicycles in Nicaragua.. J 467

XVU. — United Statf^s Interests in Nicaracjua Baker 469

XVIII. — United States Trade Methods in South America O'Hara 471

XIX. — Trade Between the United States and Honduras Little 474

XX. — Military Service of Foreigners in Chile. Strobe/ 477

XXI. — Sugar Production in the British Colonies Bartleman 478

XXII. — Flour Trade of Santiago de Cuba Hyatt 479

XXIII. — Port Charges at St. George's, Bermuda IViUett 481

XXIV. Exhibition of United States Goods in Venezuela.. ) 482

Plumachcr



A.. )



XXV.— New Steamship and Railway Lines in Venezuela.. ) 484

XXVI. Unitp:d Statf^ Lumber Trade With Uruguay Schramm 486

XXVII.— Italian Sulphur Trust Briihi 489



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n CONTENTS.

Page.

XXVIII.— A New Butter-Makin(; Machine ) ^, ,, ., 492

[■ CfNetl

XXIX.— Milking Maching, or Lactator, in Sweden j 49^

XXX.— Grain Crop of European Russia .,.Karei 498

XXXI.— Artificial Silk in France du BelUt 499

XXXII.— Artificial Silk in England Dickinson 500

XXXI II.— Germany's Textile Industries ) ,^ , 502

\ Monaghan

XXXIV. — Germany's W(X)i.en Industries ) 505

XXXV. — American Shof^ for Germany Mason 508

Mason 510



{:



XXXVI.— The New Sugar Export Bounties in Germany.. . ,, ,

' Mufh 512

XXXVII. — Samples Exhibition of Stuttgart .Johnson 515

XXXVIII. — United States Trade with Switzerland Richman 516

XXXIX. — American Horses in Ireland Brice 522

XL. — Prices of Agricultural Produce in Ireland ) ,, 523

[■ Ashby

XLI. — American Machinery in Ireland ) 524

XLII. — French vs. United Statp-s Trade in West Africa Strickland 525

XLIII. — New Tariff of British Central Africa Holiis 527

XLIV. — Japanese Laws in Formosa Herod 528

XLV. — The Sugar Industry of Formosa ) 530

Mclvor



\



XLVL— Cotton-Spinning Industry in Japan j 537

XLVII. — Railway Supplies for China Read 541

XLVIIL— Suez Canal Traffic 543

XLIX.— Crop Prospects in Spain Burke 549

L.— Strike of Coal Miners in New South Wales KeightUy 549

LI. — Horseless Carriages in Europe. Moore 552

LI I. — American Trade via the Manchester Ship Canal... ) 563

Grinned



\



LIII. — Manchester Canal Traffic in 1895 j 566

LIV. — Decrease of Bradford Exports to the United ^-xkx^... Meeker 566

LV. — Increased Trade Between United Statf.s and VEK\3....,Jasfremski 569

LVI. — Purification of W^ater by Metallic Iron ) 571

Chancellor



I Ch



LVIL— Cider Makin(; in Prance ) 576

LVIII. — Bicycles in France Griffin 583

LIX. — Guatemalan Boundary — Arch.«ol(x,ical ExpLORATioNs..5<f/«/i/fVa 585

LX. — Tehuantepec Railway Lease Crittenden 585

LXI. — Notes (A New Dynamometer — The Electric Plow in Germany — For-
eigners in German Technical Schools — Canned Horse Meat with
American Labels — Foreign Trade of Italy in 1895 — Revised Tele-
phone Tariff of Switzerland — Mineral and Metal Trade of Spain —
New Railways in Spain — Excessive Manuring in Spain — Imports
of Butter into British Guiana — Gold-Mining Returns of British
Guiana — International Exposition of Guatemala — American Trade
with New Caledonia — Consular Re|X)rts Transmitted to Oiher De-
partments) 587



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CONTENTS. Ill

Page.

LXIl. — Foreign Reports and Publications (Emigration of Discharged
German Convicts — British Trade Returns — Insurance Against Want
of Employment — Destitution in Germany and in Great Britain — Mer-
cantile Loans for Chinese Industries — British Trade Route to China —
Openings for Trade in Dutch Guicma — Woolen Mills in India) 594



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RKFORTS BY COUNTRIES.

Africa, British Central: Page.

New tariff of. '. 527

Africa, West :

French vs. United States trade in 525

Argentine Republic:

Production of sugar in 369

Bermuda :

Port charges at SL George's 481

Brazil:

Minerals, mining, etc., of the State of Bahia 384

British Colonies:

Sugar production in 478

British Guiana:

Gold-mining returns of. 592

Imports of butter into 591

Chile:

Military service of foreigners in 477

China :

Railway supplies for 541

Colombia :

Region of the Magdalena ?. 372

Trade of Barranquilla 372

Trade of Barranquilla in 1895 380

Cuba :

Flour trade of Santiago de Cuba 479

Egypt:

Suez Canal traffic ; 543

Engijvnd:

American trade via the Manchester Ship Canal 563

Artificial silk in 500

Decrease of Bradford exports to the United States 566

Manchester canal traffic in 1895 566

Europe:

Horseless carriages in 552

Pormosa:

Japanese laws in 528

Sugar industry of. 530

France :

Artificial silk in 499

Bicycles in 583

Cider making in 576

Purification of water by metallic iron , 571

Germany :

A new dynamometer in 587

American shoes for 508

Foreigners in German technical schools 588

Samples exhibition of Stuttgart 515

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REPORTS BY COUNTRIES. V

Germany — Continued. Page.

Textile industries of. 502

The electric plow in '. 588

The new sugar export bounties in 510

Woolen industries of 505

Guadeloupe :

Coffee crop of. 372

Depression in sugar industry of. 372

Guatemala :

Boundary of. 585

International exposition of 592

Honduras :

Trade with the United States 474

Ireland:

American horses in 522

American machinery in 524

Prices of agricultural produce in 523

Italy :

Foreign trade of, in 1895 589

Sulphur trust in 489

Japan:

Cotton-spinning industry in 537

Mexico :

Abolition of interstate tariffs of. 390

Amendment to the constitution of 387

Archaeological explorations in 585

Beet sugar in 410

Conversion of the national debt of. 393

Language as a factor of Mexican trade 406

Manufacture of pulque in 396

Mormon colonists in 409

New banking law of. 395

Orange crop of. 404

Oranges and lemons in Sonora 405

Perfilado, or drawn needlework, in 408

Substitute, or ad interim, President 387

Tehuantepec railway lease 585

Ni-rrHERLANDS:

Canned horse meat with American labels in Europe 588

New Caledonia:

American trade with 592

New South Walrs:

Strike of coal miners in 549

Nicaragua :

Cost of goods delivered in 451

Market for machinery and bicycles in 467

Market for United States goods in 423

Opportunities for United States trade in 410

Port of Bluefields 464

Port of San Juan 461

Resources and industrial conditions in 410

San Juan River. 461

Steamboat service in 465

United States interests in 469



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VI REPORTS BY COUNTRIES.

Peru: Page.

Increased trade with the United States 569

Peruvian corporation 381

Russia :

Grain crop of. 498

South America:

United States trade methods in 471

Spain :

Crop prospects in 549

Excessive manuring in 591

Mineral and metal trade of. 590

New railways in 591

Sweden :

Milking machine, or lactator, in 496

New butter-making machine in 492

Switzerland:

Revised telephone tariff of. 589

United States trade with 516

Uruguay :

United States lumber trade with 486

Venezuela :

Exhibition of United States goods in 482

New steamship and railway lines in 484



F^Lill cSirectlons for binding; ttie Consular Reports are given In No.

131, paice 663.



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VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.

The following statements show the valuation of foreign coins, as given by
the Director of the United States Mint and published by the Secretary of the
Treasury, in compliance with the first section of the act of March 3, 1873,
viz : '* That the value of foreign coins, as expressed in the money of account
of the United States, shall be that of the pure metal of such coin of standard
value,*' and that *'the value of the standard coins in circulation of the vari-
ous nations of the world shall be estimated annually by the Director of the
Mint, and be proclaimed on the ist day of January by the Secretary of
the Treasury.*'

In compliance with the foregoing provisions of law, annual statements
were issued by the Treasury Department, beginning with that issued on Jan-
uary I, 1874, and ending with that issued on January i, 1890. Since that
date, in compliance with the act of October i, 1890, these valuation state-
ments have been issued quarterly, beginning with the statement issued on
January i, 1891.

These estimates "are to be taken (by customs officers) in computing the
value of all foreign merchandise made out in any of said currencies, imported
into the United States.**

The following statements, running from January i, 1874, to April i,
1894, have been prepared to assist in computing the proper values in Ameri-
can money of the trade, prices, values, wages, etc., of and in foreign coun-
tries, as given in consular and other reports. The series of years are given
so that computations may be made for each year in the proper money values
of such year. In hurried computations, the reductions of foreign currencies
into American currency, no matter for how many years, are too often made
on the bases of latest valuations. When it is taken into account that the ruble
of Russia, for instance, has fluctuated from 77. 1 7 cents in 1874 to 37. 2 cents in
April, 1894, such computations are wholly misleading. All computations
of values, trade, wages, prices, etc., of and in the ** fluctuating-currency coun-
tries** should be made in the values of their currencies in each year up to
and including 1890, and in the quarterly valuations thereafter.

To meet typographical requirements, the quotations for the years 1876,
1877, 1879, 1881, and 1882 are omitted, these years being selected as show-
ing the least fluctuations when compared with years immediately preceding
and following.

To save unnecessary repetition, the estimates of valuations are divided
into three classes, viz: (A) countries with fixed currencies, (B) countries
with fluctuating currencies, and (C) quarterly valuations of fluctuating cur-
rencies.

VII



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Vlll



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.



A. — Countries with fixed currencies.
The following official (United States Treasury) valuations of foreign coins do not include " rates of exchange."
It follows, therefore, that when foreign money orders are required, the post-office authorities, to save the De-
oartment from incurring loss in such transactions, add the rate of exchange to these valuations.



Countries.



Argentine Republic*..



Austria-Hungaryf..

Belgium

Brazil



British North America
(except Newfound-
land)).

ChUeJ



Cuba^



Denmark..,
Ecypt



Finland..
France...



(jermany

Great Britain..



Greece..



Haiti..,
Italy..,



Liberia^

Ncthcrlandsg ....

Newfoundland..

Portugal...

Spain



Standard.



Monetary unit.



Gold and silver... Peso ..



Gold Crown..

Gold and silver... Frame...



Gold ...
.... do..



Gold and silver....
do



Gold ...
do...



do

Gold and silver....



Gold ..,
do..



Gold and silver....



..do

..do....



Gold

Gold and silver...



Gold

Gold

Gold and silver....



(lold .



Sweden and Norway..

Switzerland I Gold and silver....

Turkey Gold

Venezuela ' Gold and silver....



Milreis .
Dollar..



Peso..
do..



Crown

Pound (loo pias-
ters).
Mark



Franc.



Mark

Pound sterling...



Drachma..



Gourde..
Lire



.ao.3
•»9»3
•54,6
i.oo



.93.6

.26,8
4-94»3

■»9,3

•«9,3

.as, 8
4.86,6i



•96,5
.»9,3



Dollar 1.00

Florin



Dollar...
MilrcLs ..
Peseta...

Crown..,
Franc...



Piaster..
Bolivar..



1.01,4
1.08



.26,8
.«9.3

•04,4

.i9»3



Value in

terms of

United

States

gold.



Coins.



Gold— Argentine (1^4.82,4) and !4
Ai^entine ; silver — peso and di-
visions.

Gold — ao crowns (^.05,2) and 10
crowns.

(jold— 10 and 20 franc pieces ; sil-
ver— 5 francs.

Gold— 5. 10, and ao milreis; sil-
ver— J^, I, and a milreis.



.91, a Gold— «scado ^^1.82,4), doubloon
(^.56,1), and condor ($9.12,8);
silver — peso and divisions.

Gold — doubloon ($5.01,7) ; silver —
peso

Gold — 10 and 20 crowns.

Gold — zo, 2o, 50, and 100 piasters ;
silver- X, 2, 10, and 20 piasters.

Ck>ld— 10 and 20 marks ($1.03 and
13.85,9).

Gold— 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 frencs ;
silver— 5 francs.

Gold -5, 10, and 20 marks.

Gold— sovereign (pound sterling)
and half sovereign.

Gold — 5,xo,ao, 50, and 100 drach-
mas; silver — 5 drachmas.

Silver— gourde.

Gold — 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 lire;
silver— 5 lire.



Gold — xo florins; silver — J4, i,and
2% florins.

Gold — %2 {j^. 02, 7).

Gold— I, a, 5, and 10 milreis.

Gold — 25 pesetxs; silver — 5 pese-
tas.

Gold— 10 and 20 crowns.

Gold — 5, 10, 20, 50, and too francs;
silver — 5 francs.

Gold — 25, 50, 100, 200, and 500
piasters.

Gold — 5, 10, 20, 50, and xoo boli-
vars ; silver — 5 bolivars.



*In 1874 and 1875 the gold standard prevailed in the Argentine Republic. Its currency docs not appear
in the statements again until 1883, when the double standard prevailed, and the peso attained a fixed value of
96.5 cents.

f On reference to the table of " fluctuating currencies," it will be seen that Aattria had the silver standard
up to and including the quarter ending July x, 1892. The next quarter (October x) inaugurated the gold stand-
ard (x^^note under table of " fluctuating currencies ").

X The gold standard prevailed in Chile until January x, 1890. The value of the peso has been the same
under both standards.

§The NethetUndt florin, as will b« seen in the " fluctuating " uble, became fixed in vmlue (40.9 cents) in
1880.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.



IX



B. — Countries with fluctuating currencies^ 1874- go.



Countries.



Austria-Hunfi^ary*.
Holivia..



Standard.



Silver..
do...



Central America..

China

Colombia^

Ecuador.^

Egyptf.



India..

Japan

Mexico..

Netherlands J...

Peru

Russia

TripolL



do..

Silver

do..

, do..

Gold...



Monetary unit.



Florin

Dollar until
1880 ; bolivi-
ano there-
afler.

Peso

Haikwan tael....

Peso

do...

Pound (100
piasters).

Rupee



Silver

jGold

(Silver

do

Gold and silver.

Silver ' Sol

do ; Ruble

do.. > Mahbuh of 90

piasters.



f Yen.

Dollar....
Florin....



Value in terms of the United States gold dollar on
January 1 —



1874.



.96,5



.96,5
i.6x
.96,5
•96»5



.45,8
f-99»7



»04,74
.40,5
.9a»5
.77.17
.87,09



1875.



^.45,3
.96,5



.91,8
1. 61

.96,5
.91,8



^•45»3
•96,5



.91,8



.43.6
•99.7



•99,8
•38.5
•91.8

.73.4
.83,9



.96,5

.91,8

4-97.4

.43.6
.99.7



.99,8
.38. 5
.91,8
■73.4
.8a,9



1883.



1884.



|o.4X»3 ^40,1 I |o.39,8
.83,6 .81,2 I .80,6



•83,6



.83,6

.83,6

4.97.4

.39.7
•99.7



•90.9
•40, a
.83.6
.66,9
■74.8



.81,2
.81,2
4.90



.80,6
.80,6
4.90



.38,6 I .38,3



.87,6 j- .86,9
.87.5



.81,2

.65

.73,3



.80,6
.64,5
.7a,7



I



Countries.



Austria-Hungary*
Bolivia



Central America..

Colombia. ,

Ecuador

Egyptt-



India..



Japan

Mexico..,

Peru ,

Russia...,
Tripoli...,



Standard.



Silver

do



Monetary unit.



Value in terms of the United Sutes gold dollar on
January 1 —



1885.



Florin..

Dollar until
1880; bolivi-
ano there-
after.

Peso.

do...



to.



do....

do....

, do i do

Gold I Pound (too

listers).

Silver 1 Rupee.

J Gold.
I Silver.



z:::::}



Yen..



do..

Silver..

do..

do..



Dollar

Sol

Ruble

Mahbub of 20
piasters.



39.3
79.5



•79.5
.79.S

.37.8



.85,8
.86,4

.79.5
.63,6

.7«.7



1886.



>.37.»
.7S,»



#0.35.9
72,7



.75.1
.75.>
>.9o

•35,7



1887.



|o-34.5
•69,9



.81
.81,6

•75,"
.60,1

.67,7



.73.7

•72,7

4.94,3

.34.6

.99.7

.78,4

.79

•7a.7

.58,2

.65,6




.69,9


.68




.69,9


.68




.69,9


.68




494.3


4.94,3


4-


•33.2


.3a. 3




.99.7


•99.7




•75.3


.73.4




•75,9


.73,9




.69,9


.68




.55.9


.54,4




•63


.61.4





85
85
85

93,3

40,4
99.7
91,7
92,3

85
68

76.7



*The silver standard prevailed in Austria- Hungary up to 1893. The law of August a of that year {set
Consular Rkpokts, No. 147, p. 623) established the gold standard.
fThe Egyptian pound became fixed in value at $4.94,3 in 1887.
I The Netherlands florin fluctuated up to the year 1880, when it became fixed at 40.2 cents.



Digitized by VjOOQIC



VALUES OF FOREIGN COINS.



C. — Quarter /y valuations of Jlu<iuating currencies ^ i8gi-g4.



Countries.



Bolivia^

Ceniral America..



China*..



Colombia.....

Ecuador

India

Japanf

Mexico

Peru

Russia^

Tripoli

Venezuela ?..





1


1893.






1894.




Monetary unit.


1
1
































Jan.,.
W6i,3


April t.


July,.


Oct. X.


Jan. X.


April,.
I0.46.5


July ,.


Oct.,.


Silver boliviano.


^.61


JU>.6o,4


|o.53.«


|o.5«,6


|o-45.7


10.46,4


Silver peso


' .6,,3


.61


.60,4


■53»«


.51,6


.46,5


.45»7


•46.4


r Shanghai tael..


.90,6


.90,1


.89.a


.78,4


.76,2


.68,6


.67.6


.68.5


Haikwan tael..


l.OI


1.00,4 1 .99,4


.87,4


.84,9


.76.5


•75,3


.76.3


' Tien-Tsinuel.














•72»7
7».7
.46.4


(.Chefoouel








'




Silver peso


.6«,3


. 6x • 60, 4


•S3.«


.51,6


.46.5


.45.7


do


.61,3


.61 ' .60,4


.53,«


•51.6


.46.5


•45.7


.46.4


Silver rupee......


.•9,2


.39 . .28,7


.«5»2


•24,5


.23,1


.2X,7


.99


Silver yen


.66.,


.65,8 .65,1


.57.3


.55,6


•50,1


.49»3


.50


Silver dollar


.66,6


.66,a .65,6


•57»7


.56


.50,5


•49»7


•50,4


Silver sol


.6.,3
.49.'


.61

.48,8


.60,4
•48,3


.S3,«
.4>,5










Silver ruble


.51,6


.46,5


.45.7


.46,4


Silver mahbub..


.55.3


.55


•54,5


.47,9


•4».3


.37,2


.36.6


•37.'


Silver bolivar....











.46.5


.41.9


.4«,3


.4«.8



189s.



Monetary unit.



1896.



Bolivia I Silver boliviano ^0.45,5

Central America Silverpeso -45.5



f Shanghai tael..
China* ! ! Haikwan tael..

I Tien-T^in tael.

, Ichefootael

Colombia gjivcr peso

Ecuador do_

^n*!'* Silver rupee

Japant Silver yen

Mexico.^ Silver dollar

Pe«»a ' Silver kran

Pc"« Silver sol

RussiaJ Silver ruble

Tripoli Silver mahbub..



.67.3
•74,9
•71,4
•70.4
.45.5
.45,5
.21,6

.49.>
•49.5



*o.44,i
.44.1
.65,2
.75,6
.69,2
.68,3
.44,1
•44,"
.ai,o
•47,6 I
•47,9



•45,5
.36.4
.41,1



.44,1
•35,3
3-9.8



July X.


Oct. X.


10.48,6


• 48.6


.48,6


.48,6


.7«,8


.71,8


.80


.80,0


.76,1


• 76,2


•75,1


.75.2


.48,6


.48.6


.48,6


.48.6


.23,,


.23,1


.52,4


.52.4


.52,8


.52,8


.08.9


.09,0


.48,6


• 48.6


•38,9


.38,9


.43,8


.43,8



Jan. X,


April I.


^.49,«


I0.49.3




49. »


.49,3




72,5


•72,9



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign CommerceConsular reports, Issues 188-191 → online text (page 48 of 102)