United States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign Commerce.

Consular reports, Issues 188-191 online

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have been reduced to Ignited States currency.

*Priniccl in Conmlak Rkpokts, No. 183 (Dcccir.b- 1, iSysi, p. 5^7.



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MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA. 437

A force of thirty policemen is kep^t on duty. Soldiers are quartered at
the harbor entrance. The expenses of the police department are borne by
the municipality of Bluefields and the Department of Zelaya, or what was
formerly known as Mosquito Territory. Soldiers are paid by the Department.
As stated in the report of Minister Callejas, a copy of which was transmitted
to the Department December 30, the annual expenses of the Department
are 1185,703.90 (192,851.95 in United States currency). Nearly one-half of
this amount is required to maintain police and troops in the district.

The appropriation for the department of public instruction is but $9,800
($4,900 in United States currency). The revenues of the Department are
derived principally from export and import duties.

Bluefields, like San Juan del Norte, has neither railways nor wagon roads
leading from it. Its only highways are the sea and the rivers and lagoons.
The town itself is on the west side of Bluefields lagoon, and is about 6 miles
distant from the harbor entrance. The entrance is overlooked by an emi-
nence known as Bluefields Bluff. The custom-house is at the Bluff. Steam-
ships discharge all freight and p)assengers at the Bluff, the lagoon being
navigable only by very light-draft vessels. Lighters and small steamboats
are employed on the lagoon.

The coasting schooners are small and of light draft, their carrying capacity
running from 3 to 20 tons. larger boats can not cross either the Bluefields
lagoon or the bars at the mouths of the various rivers north and south of
Bluefields. Ocean steamships run up the Bluefields (also known as Escon-
dido) River as far as Rama, a distance of about 55 miles, but carry no local
freights. A small steamer runs regularly between Bluefields and Rama, but
much of the river traffic is handled by canoes and lighters. The principal
banana district commences about 25 miles above Bluefields and extends west
about 20 miles, the plantations being along the banks of the Bluefields River
and its small tributaries. The Bluefields River is formed by the junction of
the Siquia and Rama rivers. The town of Rama is built at the junction.

Banana plantations have been established on the Siquia and Rama, and
many persons claim that the lands are superior to those along the Bluefields
River. Mangoes and other fruits are plentiful in this region, but are not
exported.

In March, 1895, (Government agents were instructed to collect facts re-
specting every plantation on the Bluefields River and its affluents. These
statistics are as follows:



Dcscripiion. Number. ' Description. Number.



Plantations..

Acreage

Acreage of bananas....

Acreage of grass

Acreage imcullivated..



197 I Horses j 56

34,926 ' Gallic 209

7,100 ' Swine.. 56

430 Poultry 749

27.396 ' Superintendents employed ' 52

Banana plants 1,420,515 Lal)orcr4 (mo/os) employed I 468

Bunches of bananas annually 2,500,000



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438 MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA.

The average wages per month of superintendents, not including cost of
provisions, is $25 ; average wages per month of laborers, not including cost
of provisions, $g; estimated cost of provisions for employees annually,
^2,963. The estimated value of the annual export of bananas is ^900,000.
Of the 34,926 acres mentioned, title has been perfected in the case of but
9,745 acres.

Rama has a |X)pulation of about 2,000. At one time, Bluefields mer-
chants supplied goods to the Rama stores. The settlers on the Siquia and
Rama rivers frequently found it more advantageous to purchase their supplies
in Bluefields than in Rama, where prices were higher. The growth of Rama,
however, has led to the direct importation of goods by local merchants, and
Bluefields has thus lost a double trade.

With the exception noted, Bluefields merchants may be said to have a
monopoly of all the coast trade from Punta Gorda, on the south, to Cape
Gracias-a-Dios, on the north, a distance of about 270 miles, and of the ter-
ritory west of this sea line, ranging from 70 to 140 miles in width, according
to the length of the various rivers emptying into the Caribbean north of
Punta Gorda.

The territory tributary to Bluefields is sparsely settled. It is without rail-
ways and wagon roads. The nearest resemblance to a wagon road is an oc-
casional track or trail leading from a lumber or mining camp to the nearest
point on the river, or lagoon, upon which the camp's supplies and products
are transported to and from the sea. These camps do not deserve to be
dalled settlements. Like camps in most other wild regions, they seldom
consist of more than a few cheap and temporary buildings.

There are not less than twenty openings to the sea between Punta Gorda
and Cape Gracias-a-Dios. Along the coast, is a series of landlocked lagoons
ranging in length from 5 to 20 miles and in width from i to 7 miles. There
are small settlements at the mouths of many of the sea openings and on the
shores or banks of the principal lagoons. These settlements are nothing but
little groups of houses. Here and there may be found two or three small
stores, but the group generally comprises nothing but a single store and
eight or ten thatched dwellings and sheds. Most of the little coasters that
visit these coast and lagoon trading points are either owned or chartered by
Bluefields merchants.

The settlements in the interior of the territory described are few and far
between, and are necessarily confined to the banks of the rivers. Everything
that comes and goes must be carried by canoe. With scarcely an exception,
the river stores are of the meanest kind. The settlers on the Bluefields
River live comparatively well, but the settlers along the other rivers have
comparatively few of what we call comforts. With no markets for crops,
except such as the little store settlements afford, there is no inducement to
either clear or cultivate many acres.

A few enterprising settlers have engaged in the grazing industry, but not
to any extent. With nothing but his hands and a machete, the settler clears



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MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA. 439



and breaks an acre or so for plantains, yams, and cassava. Five or six times
a year he loads his canoe and starts for the mouth of the river. His wants
are simple, and his little cargo brings enough to satisfy all his requirements.
Rice, corn, frijoles, leaf tobacco, cheap cloth, and occasionally a yard of
ribbon or some small trinket constitute about all his purchases.

Fortunately for the settlement storekeepers, however, they have a better
class of customers than the poor settlers. Many of these storekeepers,
especially Americans, have made considerable money handling gold dust and
rubber. The gold dust and rubber are brought to the settlements and the
greater part exchanged for goods. The average miner or rubber hunter feels
comparatively rich when he has from {50 to $200 worth of gold dust or rubber,
and, if not a Chinaman, he is quite apt to spend the proceeds for articles
needful and otherwise, just as most of his brothers under like circumstances
have always done, the world over.

The foreign population of the town of Bluefields consists of 475 British
(mostly Jamaica negroes), 375 Americans, 75 Germans, 38 French, and 81
Chinese.

CORINTO AND SAN JUAN DEL SUR — IMPORTS AND EXPORTS.

Of the four ports of the Republic, Bluefields is the only one at which the
importations are greater in value than the exporlations. Various figures have
been reported and published regarding the exports and imports of the Pacific
ports. The reports made by Mr. Newell, late consul of the United States at
Managua, are the most reliable that have ever been published. But few of
the reports are not misleading, in consequence of the indiscriminate employ-
ment of figures, some representing values in United States currency and
others in the depreciated and fluctuating moneys current in Nicaragua. The
statistician for the Republic writes that his bureau, being a new one, is in
possession of but few statistics prior to 1895 ^^^^' ^^^ "^^ ^°^^^ fragmentary
and unreliable. The official figures published for 1895 are:

Imparls into San Juan del Sur from January i to June jc?, iSgs-



Imported from —



China

Colombia

Costa Rica

Ecuador

England...

France

Germany^

Italy

Mexico

Salvador

Spain

United States..,

Total....,



Number of
packages.



Weight.



Value.



433

I
1,818
19a
8.3
324
27
121

39
5,428



9,098



Pounds.




104


^10.00


2tO


285.00


48,045


1,097.76


28


X50.OO


260,080


30,968.40


17,807


4,525-76


99,391


5, 473- 92


23,437


X, 944.0a


3,064


19.52


20,846


1,396.07


3,482


282.55


679,269


17,031.29


1,155,763


63,184.29



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440 MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA.
Imports into Corinto from^ January i to August jiy i8gj.



Imported from—



Belgium

Chile

China

Colombia

Costa Rica..

Cuba

Eaiador

England

France

Germany

Guatemala...

Holland

Honduras...

Italy

Mexico

Peru

Salvador

Spain .



Number
of pack-
ages.



United Sutes 39.963



165

a86

3

136

900

3

5

i9»a45

4.705

16,230

5.009

xoo

6

529

a?

55 I

«,5a» i

93 I



Weight. I Value.

I

Pounds. '

4,344
40,018 ;

255!
»7,a5x I

58,737 I
8S4

48.1

3.567.949 '

508,386 I

7,446,616 I

479.865 '

2,534 i

783 1

57,728 .

2,044

8,068

218,557
9.490
4.853.958 I



Total ' 88,979 I 13,377,849



l3'7.58

3,551.21

2,524.50

J9.57704

6,323.69

401.90

2,189.00

414,176.04

91,063. 18

160,303.34

13,3x1.40

900.00

12,663.75

4,863.29

«.784.64

73,836.03

"25.469.52

7.733.48

279,420.83

,217.509.41



The Nicaraguan consul-general in Hamburg reports that, in 1894, the
Hamburg exports to Nicaragua amounted to $351,848.06, as against $214,-
161.96 in 1893 and $230,248.82 in 1892. The leading Hamburg exports
to Nicaragua in 1894 and their values, in round numbers, were:



Articles.



Cotton mixed goods

Woolen goods

Iron fine goods

Hosiery

Ordinary wines

Clothing and haberdashery..

Earthenware

Cotton cloth

Rice



Value.



Articles.



^2,000 ' Beer „

27,000 I Boots and shoes

36, ceo ' Wire ,

33,000 ^ Machinery

15,000 I Silks I

13,000 I Leather

13,000 I F'limiturc '

zi.ooo Paper I

io,coo ,! Umbrellas ,



Valtie.

$10,000
>o,coo

9.500
9.500

9, coo
8,000
8.000
7.500
4.200



Among the Hamburg exports were acids, artificial flowers, buttons, brush
ware, bagging, cordage, carbonate of soda, copper, cutlery, cognac, cham-
pagne, crystal, canned and potted meats, fruits and vegetables, cigars, drugs,
druggists' sundries, engravings, chromos and paintings, fancy goods, glass-
ware, gins, hats, inks, iron bars and plates, jewelry, laces, linens, mineral
wax, metals, matches, mineral waters, musical instruments, marble, mirrors,
notions, nails, ordinary ironware, organs, olive oil, perfumeries, pasteboard,
palm oil, i>etroleum, porcelain, preserves and jams, pianos, pearls, stationery,



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MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA. 44 1

statuary, shot, sewing machines, sardines, salt, spices, tea, tin and tinware,
toys, thread (all kinds), and vaseline.

Mr. Southworth, of Granada, reports that in western Nicaragua there
is little demand for foreign sugars, soaps, lard, salt, starch, beans, and toma-
toes, the home products being more popular. He says also that there is no
sale for either mince-meat, com meal, graham flour, salt pork, or corned beef.

EXPORTS FROM CORINTO JANUARY I TO JUNE 30, 1 895.

Between January i and June 30, 1895, the Corinto exports amounted to
12,065,051.85. In addition to products similar to those exported from San
Juan del Sul, the Corinto exports included books, cigars, corn, fish, fruit,
gold, grass mats, hammocks, jewelry, palms, rice, starch, soaps, specie, sole
leather, tamarinds, and tobacco. England, Germany, France, Italy, Aus-
tria, and the United States took ^1,873,291.80, as follows:



Whither exported.



Cacao (Italy)

Cigars, puros (Uniied States). .

Coffee:

Austria

Elngland

France

Germany

Italy

United States

Total



Deerskins (United Slates »,.

Dyewoods :

France

Germany



Toul..



Gold:

England

Uniied Stales..



Total..



Amount.

$50.00

.75



443- 10

197.492.91

"5,39»a3

«.«5«. 563.15

89,664.50

aaS, 107. 67



J. 775


,662


56


2


539-


58











93-


oo




620


00



713.00

2,875.00 :
1,333. 50
4,208.50



Whither exported.



Fruits (United States)..

Hides:

France

United States



Total..



JeweUy (Italy)

Rubber (United Slates)..
Seeds (Germany)

Specie :

England

France

United States



Total..



Sugar (Italy)

Tamarinds (Italy)..

Grand total ..



Amount.



$1.50

60.00
3,099.67

3,089.67

150.00

8,959-49
4.25



14,525.00

1,300.00

62,075.00

77,900.00

10.00
a. 50

1,873,291,80



The remaining exports were distributed as follows, $65,720 thereof being
silver specie:

Colombia $2,165.02

Costa Rica 23,092.57

Guatemala 26,331.25

Honduras 9.408.35

Salvador 130,762.86

Total 191,760.05

Next to specie, corn (maize) was the leading export to the neighboring
republics and amounted to $47,494, of which Salvador alone took $43»5oo-



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442 MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA.

Next on the list was sugar, which was distributed as follows:

Costa Rica ;$I5,685

(Guatemala 15,800

Honduras 2,104

Salvador 150

Total 33,739

Other leading exports to Central American states were:





Articles.


Amount.


Destination.


Cheese


;$»o,50o
8,950
a.465
4,82a

2,465
3,000
1,400

725
320


Mostly to Salvador.
Do.


Frijolcs (beans) .


Sole leather


Do.


Salt


Ail to Guatemala and Salvador


Tobacco -


All to Costa Rica.


Lard




Mostly to Salvador.
Mostly to Costa Rica.
Mostly to Honduras.
All to Honduras.








Shoes







EXPORTS FROM SAN JUAN DEL SUR, JANUARY I TO JUNE 30, 1 895.

The San Juan del Sur exports during the first six months of 1895
amounted to ^104,715.34, and consisted of beans (frijoles), butter, cheese,
cacao, coffee, carved cocoanut shells, etc., dried beef, deerskins, dyewoods,
hides, indigo, lard, logwood, palm hats, rope, rubber, seeds, shoes, salt,
and sugar.

Exports valued at $23,029.85 were shipped to Colombia, Guatemala,
Salvador, and Costa Rica. The leading exports to Colombia and the Cen-
tral American states were: Cheese, $14,212. 32; lard, $2,488.62; sugar,
$714.10. Shoes valued at $87 were shipped to Costa Rica. All other
exports went to England, Germany, France, and the United States, and
consisted entirely of indigo, coffee, hides, rubber, dyewoods, and deer-
skins. The exports to Europe and the United States were distributed as
follows:



Whither exported.



Whither exported.



Coffee : j

England ^^18,559.20



France

(iermany

United States..



Total..



Deerskins (United States)..
Dyewoods (Germany)



8


627.


75


38


213-


10


6


734.


15


72


134-


20




187.


32




640.


00



Hides (United States)..
Indigo (Germany)



Rubber :

England

United States..



Amount.

I534 52
5,110.30



Total

Grand total..




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MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA. 443
SAN JUAN DEL NORTE EXPORTS AND IMPORTS.

Exports. — The exports from San Juan del Norte during the year ending
June 30, 1895, were:



Articles.



Where to.



England.



France. (Jermany. , Holland.



Italy.



I



100.00
13,205.29



Alligator skins,

Cocoanuts '

Coffee I $23,609.85

Deerskins I 3,024.92

Feathers

Gold dust

Hammocks

Hides.

Indigo

Photographing

outfit

Rubber

Specie

Tortoise shells.



$14,337-90 $i85.7«6.8o
>,428.i7



4,078.75 3, 510- 00



3,co2.22 740'65

6,047.90 11,311.50



1.150-57
5,067. 10



45,984.45
Total ' 93,97463



535.85 5,349-75 i



546.00

31,550.65 202,222.39 I



-I



$114.00



United
States.



$10.00
1,471.20



Total.



$10.00
1,471.20



258,555.14 482,333.69
21,108.28 24,561.37



1,016.25 '
22,608.00 j

I '5.00 I

42S.25 « 15,240.70

589.00 418.93



580.50



1,116.25

43,402.04

15.00

20,562.39

23,434.40

10.00
184,045.73

\ 1,100.00 I 1,100.00

546.00

703. CO 453,576.90 732,608.07



I



10.00

132,023.43



Imports. — Between July i, 1894, and June 30, 1895, ^^^ ^^^ J^'^" ^^1
Norte imports were as follows:



Colombia

Costa Rica..

England

France

(Jermany

ffolland



Where from.



Amount.

$4,215.67

3'8.75

65. 575- 6 >

6,674.08
57,248.57

4, » 58- 24



Where Irom.



Honduras

Jamaica

United Stales.,



$173.00

3,666.42

87.428.68

Total 229,459.01



The following is a complete list of the imports for the year ending June
30, 1895, ^s described in the bills of lading:



Articles.



I Number.



Articles.



I Numl>er.



Aerometers package...

Arms and ammunition ;

Air guns cases...

Do package...

Ammunition cases...

Cartridges do

Do package-*...

Cartridge shells cases...

Firearms do

Guns do



Do packages...}

Gunpowder cases...'

Percussion caps do j

Revolvers do I



42 ,|
88 I



236

14

6



67



Arms and ammunition — Continued.

Rifles cases..

Do number..

Shot keg"*..

Do c.xse..

Sundries l)alc..

Bagging :

lUgs. empty bales..

Burlaps do

Sacks, coffee do

Barometers c.tsc..

Baskets crates..

Do bundles..

B.tsket ware cases..



4
80



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444 MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA.
Imports for the year ending June ^o, i8gs — Continued.



Articles.



Bicycles, etc. :

Bicycles.. crates...

Tricycles do

Velocipedes.. do

Books, etc. :

Books cases...

Do package...

Catalogues, etc cases...

Do„ packages...

Chromos cases...

Do» crate...

Engravings trunk...

Paintings cases...

Picture frames.. crates...

Playing cards cases...

Booths bale...

Brass:

Polish case...

Valves do

Ware do

Carriages, etc. :

Axles.. bundle...

Carriages crates...

Baby do

Doll case...

Carriage poles.„ bundles...

Carriage shafts do

Wheels-
Carriage do

Carl crates...

Ox bows bundle...

Wagon fittings cases...

Wagon material do

Wagon wheels bundles...

Wagon tires do

Cattle (bulls) :

Holstein

Swiss

Cement barrels...

Clocks, jewelry, etc. :

Cash registers case...

Clocks do

French do

Jewelry packages..

Do cases...

Plated goods do

Spectacles tin,..|

Coal (in bags) tons...

Cordage, etc. :

Rope bales...

Do coils...

Do packages...

String bales...

Twine do......

Cork fenders bundles...

Corks case...

Do ..bale...

Copper goods crates...

Crockery, etc. :

China ware cases...

Crockery do



Number.



Articles.



'3 I

X I

7 '



Crockery, etc. — Continued.

Crockery ..caslcs..

Do barrels..

Earthenware .cases..

Do.... barrets..

Do casks..

Do crates..

Porcelain „ cases..

Pottery ^ tierce..

Drugs, etc. :

Alum hags..

Ammonia..^ case..

Adds.. .- do

Do barrel..

Do cases..

Benzine ^do

Bisulphate of lime packages..

Brushes (toilet) case..

Do trunks..

Carbolic acid cases..

Castor oil do

Caustic soda drums..

Chloride of lime barrels..

Chalk cases..

Citric acid do

Cocoa butten. do

Cordials ..do

Dentists' sundries do

Drawing materials do

Ether „ do

Florida water do

Do packages..

Do kegs..

Hide poisons cases..

India-rubber goods trunk..

Lampblack barrels..

Medicines cases..

Do packages..

Do half barrels..

Mercury packages..

Nitric acid case..

Pa.nes do

Perfumed spirits do

Perfumed water do

Perfumeries do

Do tmnks..

Quinine .xases..

Do package..

Rhubarb case..

Silicate soda batrels..

Soda „do

Sozodont ..case..

Sulphur barreb..

Sulphuric acid cases..

Sundries do

Do packages..

Do trunks..

Do keg..

Do „ barrel..

Toilet water cases..

Tonics do



Number.



23

29

7'
40

3

3

as



4
65
>3

3

5
I
25
71
4



16

97

3

4



35

I

6

3

379

83
3



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MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA. 445
Imports for the year ending June jo^^ i8gs — Continued.



Articles.



DnigH, cic. — Continued.



Number.



Tooih powders.^ packages...

Do.„ case...

Trusses do

Ultramarine kegs...

Vaseline cases...

Whiting half barrels...

Dry goods, etc. :

Artificial flowers cases...

Bedding bales...

Blankets—

Wool do

Mixed do

Cotton do

• Buttons cases...

Carpels bales...

Do case...

Clothing (men's) do

Do trunks...

Do parceU...

Cloths cases...

Do parcels...

Coatings case...

Collars and cufls do

Do packages...

Corsets case...

Cotton goods do

Do trunk...

Do b.nle...

Cotton and silk goods cases...

Cotton waste„ bales...

Cotton wool case...

Cottons.. do

Do bales...

Do bundles...

Do trunk...

Cotton samples packages...

Cotton and wool mixed bales...

Domestics do

Drapery cases...

Do bale...

Dresses trunk...

Drills.. do

Duck rolb...

Dry goods cases...

Do bales...

Do trunks...

Do.. packages...

Dry -goods samples trunk...

Elastic web case...

Fans do

Flags packages...

Flannels cases...

Haberdashery do

Handkerchiefs —

Cotton do

Linen do

Silk do

Hats and caps do

Do trunks...

Do packages...



50
"75
33



M

149

»59



3



Articles.

Dry goods, etc. — Continued.

Hats (straw) „cases..

Do trunks..

Hemp goods case..

Hosiery do

Dc bales..

Do trunks..

Laces packages .

Do trunks..

Lawns cases..

L'nens do

Do trunks..

Matting rolls..

Neck ware.. bales..

Do case..

Needles.. cases..

Do packages..

Notions cases..

Do packages..

Oilcloths cases..

Do bales..

Overalls cases..

Sheetings bales..

Shirts:

Cotton cases..

Do bales..

Silk trunks..

Wool cases..

Shawls do

Silk trunk..

Silk„ cases..

Silk samples packages..

Tarpaulins cases..

Thread do.. ..

Tissues do

Do bales..

Trunks number..

Turbans.. case..

Umbrellas cases..

Do bales..

Underware cases..

Wool and cotton mixtures bales..

Wool and silk mixtures ..do

Woolen goods cases..

Do bales..

Woolens cases..

Do bales..

Dynamite cases..

Electric bells do

Fire clay barrels..

Furniture :

BedslaLs „ case..

Bedsteads... racks..

Bureaus .....bale..

Chairs bundles..

Chair stock do

Coat racks bale..

Furniture cases..

Do bales..

Do packages..

Mattresses bales..



Number.



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446 MARKET FOR UNITED STATES GOODS IN NICARAGUA.
Imports for the year endint^ June jOy iSgs — Continued.



Furniture — Continued.

Mattresses cases...

Mattresses and pillow's bales...

Mirrors cases...

Pillows bale..

Scats (stool) crate...

Tables do

Do bundles...

Upholstery bales...

Washsiands do

(jlassware cases...

J)o barrels...

Do casks...

Do tierce...

Do package...

(Ilas.s bottles cases...

Grease do

Dt> barrels..

Do tierces...

Groceries, provisions, etc. :

Almonds cases...

Apricots do

Asp.traKUs do

Bacon do

Do barrels...

Do half barrels...

Baking iwwder cases...

Beans do

Do sacks...

Do half barrels...

Do barrels...

Beef (canned) cases...

Do half barrels...

Do barrels...

Beef extracts cases...

Bread half barrels...

Biscuit cases...

Bluing do

Do kegs...

Br<M)nis bales...

Do bundles...

Brushci* (scrub) cases...

Butter :

Cainied do

Fresh tubs...

Do firkins...

Buttcrinc cases...

Do tubs...

Candles cases...

Candleslicks do

Canned goods do

Capers do

Catbup do

Cheese do

Cl«»lhespins do

Cocoa packages...

Codfish cases...

Coffee (ground) do

Confectionery do

Do pails...

Conserves cases...



Number. I



Articles.



44

io6



34



6

23

5

lo;

24
59
lot
III
H7
4



4
30
25



59
27

9

6

335



6 ,
117



84 .



Groceries, provisions, etc. — Continued.
Com barrels...

Do sacks...

Do pounds...

Canned cases...

Meal half barrels...

Do barrels...

Cornstarch cases...

Crackers do

Do casks...

Do half barrels...

Currants cases...

Kxlracis „ do

Figs do

Fish-

Salt half barrels...

Do barrels...

Canned c.iscs...

Flour half barrels...

Do barrels...



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign CommerceConsular reports, Issues 188-191 → online text (page 58 of 102)