United States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign Commerce.

Consular reports, Issues 188-191 online

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Date.



Nov. 90,1895
Nov. 30, 1895
Dec. 2, 1895
Feb. 3,1896
June 8,1896
Apr. 16,1896

Feb. 15,1896
Jan. 34,1896
May 1,1896
May 13, 1896
Apr. 9, Z896

Apr. 18,1896

May 9,1896
May 16,1896
June 10, 1896

Apr. 93,1896
June 11,1896
Jan. 16,1896



Subject.



Cereal crop* of Russia...

Cultivation of cotton in Russia,

Russian hop crop of 1895

Ruiusian grain and flour trade...

Grain crop of European Russia.

Cattle plague in European
Russia.

Wool industry

New South Wales..

Damage to crops in Spain

Spanish demand for wheat

Publications beneficial to
American trade.

Method of pruning trees in
luly.

Rice market

do

Swiss domestic-animal census
for 1895.

Antidiphtheritic serum..

Ciold in British Guiana ,

Receipts of gold at the Mel-
bourne mint.



Department to which referred.



Department of Agriculture.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.
Do.

Do.

Do.

Do.^

Do.

Marine Hospital Service.
Director of the Mint.
Do.



No.



190-



■15-



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FOREIGN REF^ORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.

Emigration of Discharged Germao Convicts. — The British consul at Dus-
seldorf, in a report to his Government enumerating the many labor associa-
tions in Germany for securing employment to workmen, says:

Besides these, there are voluntary associations to provide board, lodging, and employ-
ment, such as cutting firewood, beating carpets, etc., for those who travel about seeking work.
The discharged convicts, who have been imprisoned for longer periods of time, are looked
after by similar institutions, which, when employment can not be found in the neighborhood,
provide means of migration or emigration, as the case may be.



British Trade Returns. — The accounts of trade and navigation of the
United Kingdom for the month of May and for the five months ending May
31, 1895 and 1896, make the following showing of British imports and ex-
ports :

Imports.



Articles.



Month 0/ May.

Animals, living, for food ,

Articles of food and drink :

Duty free

Dutiable..

Tobacco

Metals

Chemicals, dyes, and tannics

Oils

Raw materials for textiles ,

Raw materials for other industries

Manufactured articles

MisccIUincous goods

Parcel post

Total

hive months ending May ji.

Animals, living, for food

Articles of food and drink :

Duty free

Dutbble

Tobacco. „

Metals

Chemicals, dyes, and tannics

Oils

Raw materials for textiles

Raw materials for other industries

Manufactured articles ,

Miscellaneous goods

Parcel post

Total

594



1895.



^,027,102

57, 493*736

8,430,562

1,292,896

7,654,218

2,687,492

3,430,530

27,769,558

16,893,29a

33,34«,832

5,685,434

397,066

169,103,718



14,675,282



956,657
491,926
534,106
07a, 629
720,800
428,621
141,212
983,958
34,793
345,376
2,211,631

826,696,991



264
46,
5.
33,
15.
15.

181,
68,

i49i
27,



1896.



I



Increase.



Decrease.



^,663,919

5i,7»«.o56

8,350,966

1,606,588

8,601,283

a, 244, 355

3,829,141

27,323,241

16,948,698

32,156,482

5,552,486

283,527

162,281,042



21,478,967



277,
45i
7i
40,
«7.
x6,

X79i
78,

165,

29.



614,626
183,346
667,356
792,724
894,472
505,533
750, 95»
213,992

576,321
407,739
137.923



882,223,950



11636,117



313,692
947,065



55,486



9,133,950
5,720,095
2," 73, 672
1,076,912



9,230,034
16,441,538
9,069,363



55,526.959



#5,772,680
79,596



443, >37
601,389

446, 3<>



6,803,685
12,657,969



',"85,350
'32,948
"3,539

6,823,676



1,308,580



,390,961



73.708



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLIC aTIUiNS.
Exports.



595



Articles.



Month of May.

Animals^ living

Articles of food and drink

Raw materials..



Manufactured and partly manufactured articles :

Textiles and yams.„

Metals and metal goods

Machinery and millworK ,

Apparel and personal effects ,

Chemicals, chemical products, and medici-
nal preparations ,

Mother ,



Total manufactures..



Parcel post..



Total British exports..
Foreign products..



1895.



Total exports..



Five months ending May 31.

Animals, living.

Articles of food and drink

Raw materials



Manufactured and partly manufoctured articles :

Textiles and yams.„

Metals and metal goods

Machinery and millwork

Apparel and personal effects....

Chemicals, chemical products, and medici-
nal preparations

All other.



Total manufactures..



Parcel post....

Toul British exports. .
Foreign products ,

Total exports



$421, 88a
3.8i3,97«
8, •'97, 503



37,277,986
11,976,766
6,543»397
a. 643, 698

3.933»674
X3»774»673



76


i49»494




582,


460








89,265


310


25


380,


010


"4


645


320









1.232,558

17,992, » 35
33»705,8o9

i99»043,3o8
52,394,655
28,326,446
16,670,916

17,028,480
60,960,761



X896.



I381.344
3,987,461
7.525,824 i



Increase. Decrease.



$«73,49o



^♦0,538



37,120,836

14,362,233 9,385,467
7,139.230 595,833
3,a26,687 ' 582,989



771,679



156,450



3.444,2x3

13,648,278 '

78,941.477 I 2,791,983



489,461
126, 305



707, 53»



I



9»»543.637 2,278,327

23,215,482 1 2,164,528



"4, 759, "9



",527,705 295,147
19.554.600 1,562,465
34,105,987 400.178



374.424,566
2,397.478



429,752.546 I
121,482,517



8x5,822,956 I 16,779,648 1
6S,697»545 13.302,890 I
32,731.903 ' 4,405.457 I
20,574,937 1 3,904,021 I

»8,344,2i5 I i,3»5,735 I
67,686,878 I 6,726,117 I



420,858,434 I 46,433,868
3,121,281 I 723,803



479,168,007 49,415,461
122,962,910



551.235,063



609,130,917



1,480,854 I..
50.895,854 j..



Insurance Against Want of Employment — A report from the British vice-
consul at Cologne on the '* Society for Insurance Against Want of Employ-
ment" has been laid before Parliament and printed. Workmen who are at
least 18 years of age and have had their domicile in the community of
Cologne for at least two years and are not incapacitated from working can
insure in this society by the payment of 6 cents per week. The time during
which the unemployed can draw insurance runs from December 15 to March
15, but no one can draw insurance for a longer period than eight weeks. It
is not necessary to give in detail the many and minute rules governing the
payment of insurance, to protect the society from imposition, and to safeguard
its funds. The daily allowance to the insured for the first twenty workdays



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596 FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.

are : For a married unemployed workman or a widower, in case he has to
provide for one or more children, 48 cents; for an unmarried unemployed
workman or a widower, 36 cents. For all time after the first twenty days,
the allowance is fixed at one-half these sums. The funds of the society con-
sist of (i) subscriptions of the members, (2) contributions of the insured, (3)
contributions of the city of Cologne, and (4) voluntary donations. The
society is governed by a board consisting of (i) the Oberbiirgermeister of
Cologne or the alderman nominated b.y him, (2) the chairman of the Cologne
general labor registry, and (3) eighteen members, viz, six delegated by the
committee of the insured workmen and twelve members elected by the gen-
eral meeting (provided for in the by-laws), one-half of whom belong to the
employing class, the other half being neither employers nor workmen.



Destitution in Germany and in Great Britain. — The British consul at
Dusseldorf, in a report to his Government upon labor organizations in Ger-
many and the relative amount of destitution in both countries, says:

Whether the amount of ]X)verty is greater or less io England than in this country is a
matter requiring statistical proofs not easy to obtain, but one thing is quite certain — that in
this country it does not meet the eye to the same extent as in ours, which, nevertheless, is so
celebrated for its charitable institutions. I am inclined to believe that the proportion of des-
titution will be found to be greater in the British Isles than in Germany, and, possibly, the
cause of this state of things may be found in the diflerent systems of municipal, communal,
and provincial administration in such matters.



Mercantile Loans for Chinese Industries. — The North China Daily News,
of May 13, 1896, prints a translation of a proclamation, issued by the taotai
of Shanghai, to the Kiangsu merchants proposing that the loan at interest
advanced by them to the Government should, as it fell due, be handed over
to the board of mercantile affairs for the promotion of mercantile enterprise,
or else that they themselves take the money, giving security that it be used
in the establishment of such industries. The measure is proposed in obedi-
ence to an imperial edict for the furtherance of mercantile enterprise, the
idea l^eing that as "union is strength,*' the enterprise will soon be fairly
under way. Every factory that is established, it is stated, will stop a drain
on the country's resources. Extending the system by degrees, it will secure
advantages for Chinese trade, without benefiting officials in the least. Upon
some of the Kiangsu merchants protesting that on account of their limited
means they could not afford to invest their loans in this way, the viceroy of
the two Kiang provinces sent a telegram in which he says that the Chinese
merchants are short-sighted and wanting in solidarity and the capacity for
united effort; that the source of wealth of the foreign merchants is derived
from their capacity for united efforts which lead to the formation of large



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBUCATIONS. 597

companies; that if the merchants are really in difficulties, and if it is im-
perative that they should receive back their ready money they shall, after
careful inquiry into their circumstances, be excused from taking shares.

It will be easily understood why the merchants would allow their money
to be invested in the contemplated enterprises rather than suffer an examina-
tion into their condition, which would stamp them with the taint of insol-
vency. The Governnjent ''request," therefore, has all the force of an
edict, and it may be assumed that the merchants throughout the Empire will
invest their loans to the Government, principal and interest, as they fall
due, in the building of industries throughout the Empire, no restrictions
being placed upon the investors as to the industries to be inaugurated, the
intention being to render China as independent as possible of foreign
manufacturers and producers.

It is stated in the proclamation that the loan which should revert to the
merchants of Soochow has been, in accordance with Government direction
and rhercantile acquiescence, already handed over to the board of mercan-
tile affairs for the purpose indicated, and that the same procedure is to fol-
low in regard to the Shanghai merchants' loan. Thus these war loans may
result in the building up of various industries throughout China.

In the inauguration and working out of these new enterprises, the Gov-
ernment and Government officials, it is explained, have no direct interest,
further than to grant whatever necessary concessions the merchants them-
selves may request and the Government may see fit to allow. In another
telegram to the taotai of Shanghai, the viceroy say?:

It is not necessary to make a hard and fast choice of some branch of industry, such as the
manufacture of piece goods or silk filature. There is plenty of profit to be derived from other
industries, such as the manufacture of foreign candles, foreign sugar, or foreign crockery. It
will be a good thing for those with small capital to manufacture several kinds of articles, with
a view to accustom the popular mind (to the innovation). No capital belonging to officials
will be put in, nor will other merchants or officials be mixed up in the matter. Hereafter,
the merchants will manage their business as they please and the officials will have no ques-
tions to ask. At present, all that the board of mercantile affairs b doing is to take charge of
the money due to the merchants. As regards what works are to be established or what busi-
ness transacted, the board has nothing to do. The above measures are proposed in obedience
to the imperial edict for the furtherance of mercantile enterprise.

It is proposed to reduce the duties and likin on all the goods manufactured by these new
establishments founded in obedience to imperial edict.



British Trade Route to China.* — Yesterday Lord Salisbury and Lord
George Hamilton received at the Foreign Office a deputation from the As-
sociated Chambers of Commerce, who asked the support of the Government
for making trade routes in China, either by undertaking the construction



•From the London Times, June 13, 1896.



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598 FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.

of railways or making some reasonable guaranty of the capital required.
* * * Sir Stafford Northcote, M. P., in introducing the deputation, said
their object was to impress the views of the associated chambers upon the
Government with regard to the trade route to China. The chambers had
unanimously passed the following resolution :

That, as the connection by railway of a seaport in Burma with southwest China at Sumao
is greatly required, in order to open out to British trade our new territories in the basin of the
Mekong and to enable British manufacturers to compete with those of France in northern
Siam and in southwest China, this association urges upon the imperial and Indian govern-
ments the necessity for such a railway leading to Sumao, either from Moulmein via Siam or
from Rangoon wholly through British territory via Karenni, to be undertaken or guarantied
by the Government, and also for permission to be obtained from the Chinese Government for
the continuation of the railway through Sumao into the Chinese dominions on conditions not
less favorable than those granted to the F'rench for the continuation of their railways into
China.

The importance of this resolution had been emphasized by the conference
of associated chambers of the Empire having unanimously voted the same
resolution that day.

Lord Salisbury, in the course of his reply, said :

It does not require proof that it is a great object for us to introduce our commerce into
the valley of the Yellow River. We at all times have had that as an object. At a lime
when so many nations of the world think that it is a great achievement of statesmen to
exclude the commerce of other nations, it is more than ever important to us that wc should
obtain these accesses to great foreign markets. * . * * We have added considerably in
the past ten years to the area of the British Empire. I do not value the mere addition of so
many square miles of territory; what I value is the addition of so many free markets to the
commerce of the country. Looking at the matter from that point of view, of course there is
nothing that interests us more than this attempt to obtain access to the markets of Chma from
behind, where practically we are almost without a rival, if not entirely without a rival, and
where we shall tap sources of supply and give an outlet to the efforts of industry which no
other arrangement by the seaboard can accomplish. * * * Therefore, with resi^ect to
much that has been said, I have this answer to make : You provide a powerful and solvent
company and we will assist you so far as we can to bring it to the edge of the British territory;
and when we have done so — it may seem arrogant to say it to you — I have not the slightest
doubt that we shall be able to penetrate into foreign territory whenever we think it is desir-
able to do so. I do not believe there is, .and I have never heard of, any foreign country, see-
ing the terminus of a railway on the other side of its border, that has refused to give facilities
for that railway to enter its land. What you have to do is, therefore, to provide the means for
carrying this railway on. I can assure you not only of the good will, but of the assistance of
the British and Indian governments to the utmost of their power so far as it is on their own
territory. 15eyond that I can say nothing. That, of course, deals with the question of the
railway. I have no doubt, from an engineering point of view, that Mr. Holt Ilallett is most
fully justified in the view that he takes, and that it would be a great benefit to the world if
he could carry his railway from Raheng, in the valley of the Upper Menam, into the districts
of China, and I hope he will do so. The Siamese is a very enlightened Government, and I
think it is becoming more enlightened every day, and the security which has recently been
conferred upon it will, I have no doubt, enormously stimulate its efforts to improve the ma-
terial condition of the country under its charge. I hope very earnestly that they will give all
their attention and all the assistance they can to any railway which has for its object to open
the upper parts of its territory.



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS. 599

Openings for Trade in Dutch Guiana.* — Mr. Sydney A. Churchill, Her
Majesty's consul at Paramaribo, Dutch Guiana, in a recent report to the For-
eign Office, states that there is a market in Surinam for machinery, if it is
properly looked after. Attention must be given to the requirements of the
purchaser. It is alleged that the British manufacturer looks to the amount
which the buyer has at his disposal rather than to the suitability of the arti-
cles supplied to the requirements of the purchaser. Foreign makers inquire
what the machine is required for, and offer valuable suggestions as to the
most suitable plant for the purpose to be effected, even sending men out to
the machine-employing district and studying local requirements. Very
often a suggestion of great moment is evolved by the joint combination of
the practical experience of the manufacturer and the planter. Until British
manufacturers show a disposition to personally visit their markets and study
local requirements they will have to see foreigners successfully comi>eting
with them. At one of the biggest sugar estates, which is managed by an
Englishman, it was said that all the machinery used was French, and that
the manager would always recommend it because the manufacturer came out
himself and made his plant a success before handing it over, remedying all
defects which showed themselves, and suggesting various improvements
which perfected the machinery he had supplied.

A great deal of attention has been given in recent years in Dutch Guiana
to cocoa-drying machinery. Various systems have been tried experimentally.
A manufacturer with a good, simple, and economical system might find
some buyers in the market.

Surinam has had but one visit from a representative of a British com-
mercial firm during 1894 and 1895, and that visit was from the chief partner
in a well-known firm of general merchants of London and New York. Ger-
man, American, French, and other commercial travelers are constantly
visiting the market.

One of the most important items in the list of imports is that of cotton
piece goods. The value of the importation in 1894 was about ;£^53,ooo,
and in 1895, about ;^62,ooo. Of these amounts, about ;£4,ooo in 1894
and ^10,000 in 1895 came direct from England. British Guiana in both
years figures for over ^5,000 in the totals, and the remainder comes almost
entirely from Dutch ports, but, nevertheless, Manchester is given as the
place of origin of the goods. A little care and attention to the wants of
this market would stimulate and improve the trade. Cheapness is the great
essential.

There should be an opening in Dutch Guiana for piece goods printed in
India, and the coolie-carrying ships should be a good medium to try the
market with. Indian muslins and light silks, on which the customs duty is
10 per cent, might also find a ready sale.



*Froin the British board of Trade Journal, June, 1896.



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6CX) FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.

Woolen Mills in India.* — According to a statement issued by the India
Office, there were six woolen mills at work at the close of 1895 — one in the
twenty-four i^arganas in Bengal, one at Cawnpore, one at Bangalore, one at
Shariwal, in the Punjab, and two in the city of Bombay. The number of
looms and spindles in 1895 was 531 and 17,244, and the value of the output
is reported at about 256,360 rupees. The fabrics made at present consist
mainly of blankets, greatcoats for the police and native soldiery, and mate-
rials for servants* clothing. Serges and other cloths and hosiery of excel-
lent quality are also made in the Cawnpore and Dhariwal mills, but the
manufacture of superior goods is as yet comparatively limited.



*From the British Board of Trade Journal, June, 1896.



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~3S:^<i



\lr>\ I I



Nl /^ \fK\



\

WASHINGTON!

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

1896.



S.



c.



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PUBLICATIONS OF THE BUREAU OF STATISTICS, DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

The publications of the Bureau of Statistics, Department of State, are :

I. — Commercial Relations, being the annual reports of consular officers on the com-
merce, industries, navigation, etc., of their districts.

II. — Consular Reports, issued monthly, and containing miscellaneous reports from
consular officers.

III. — Advance Sheets, Consular Reports, issued for the convenience of the news-
paper press, commercial and manufacturing organizations, etc., usually three or four times a
month, and containing selected reports of immediate interest.

IV. — Exports Declared for the United States, issued quarterly, and containing the
declared values of exports from the various consular districts to the United States for the pre-
ceding three months.

V. — Special Consular Reports, containing series of reports from consular officers on
particular subjects, made in pursuance to instructions from the Department

Following are the special publications issued by the Bureau prior to 1 890:

Labor in Europe, 1878, one volume; Labor in Foreign Countries, 1884, three voliimes;
Commerce of the World and the Share of the United Slates Therein, 1879; Commerce of the
World and the Share of the United States Therein, 1880-81 ; Declared Exports for the United
States, First and Second Quarters, 1883; Declared Exports for the United States, Third and
Fourth Quarters, 1883. Cholera in Europe in 1884, 1885; Trade Guilds of Europe, 1 885;
The Licorice Plant, 1885; Forestry in Europe, 1887; Emigration and Immigration, 1885-86-
(a portion of this work was published as Consular Reports No. 76, for the month of April,
1887); Rice Pounding in Europe, 1887; Sugar of Milk, 1887; Wool Scouring in Belgium,
1887; Cattle and Dairy Farming in Foreign Countries, 1888 (issued first in one volume, after-
wards in two volumes) ; Technical Education in Europe, 1888; Tarifis of Central America and
the British West Indies, 1890.

The editions of all these publications except Tariffs of Central America, etc., are exhausted
and the Department is, therefore, unable to supply copies.

Information relating to special subjects — ^secured by circulars addressed to consular
officers — increased to such an extent that, in 1890, the Department decided to publish such
reports in separate form, to be entitled Special Consular Reports. There are now the
following Special Consular Rei'Orts :

Vol. I {i8go\ — Cotton Textiles in Foreign Countries, Files in Spanish America, Carpet
Manufacture in Foreign Countries, Malt and Beer in Spanish America, and Fruit Culture in
Foreign Countries.

VoL 2 {i8gi). — Refrigerators and Food Preservation in Foreign Countries, European
Emigration, Olive Cultiure in the Alpes Maritimes, and Beet Sugar Industry and Flax Culti-
vation in Foreign Countries.

Vol. J (iSgi). — Streets and Highways in Foreign Countries.

Vol* 4 \18g2). — Port Regulations in Foreign Countries.

Vol.s {i8g2). — Canals and Irrigation in Foreign Countries.

VoL 6 \i8g2\, — Coal and Coal Consumption in Spanish America, Gas in Foreign Coun-
tries, and India Rubber.

Vol. 7 {iSgsY — The Stave Trade in Foreign Countries and Tariffs of Foreign Countries.

VoL 8 \18g2). — Fire and Building Regulations in Foreign Countries.

VoL 9 \18g2 and i8g3\ — Australian Sheep and Wool, and Vagrancy and Public Charities



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign CommerceConsular reports, Issues 188-191 → online text (page 76 of 102)