United States. Dept. of Commerce and Labor United States. Bureau of Foreign Commerce.

Consular reports, Issues 224-227 online

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Ensenada, May 20, 1899, in regard to the discovery of very rich gold
placers near the San Jos6 and Santa Clara mountains, within i league
of the Pacific coast. The port is Ascension Bay. There are already,
says Mr. Taylor, about 2,000 persons on the ground. The mining
camps of Santa Rosalie, San lawa, and Calmall6 are deserted. The
placers are 3 leagues wide and 12 or 15 leagues long.



Gold Output of Russia. — Under date of March 24, 1899, Consul
Smith, of Moscow, writes that the total output of the gold mines in
Russia for the year 1898 amounted to 1,300,000 ounces, or 81,250
pounds.

Stock in Venezuela. — Consul Plumacher, of Maracaibo, under
date of March 18, 1899, writes that a decree has been issued by the
President, ordering a census of the cattle in the country to be taken.
According to the latest returns, the number of cattle, etc., in Vene-
zuela is: Oxen, 2,004,257; sheep, 176,668; goats, 1,667,272; horses,
191,079; mules, 89,186; asses, 312,810; pigs, 1,618,214. The new
census will doubtless, says Mr. Plumacher, show much larger figures.
A copy of the consul's report has been sent the Department of Agri-
culture.



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NOTES. 583

Increase in Venezuelan Tariff. — Minister Loomis cables from
Caracas, May 19, 1899, that the new tariff law of Venezuela, by
which the President is empowered to add 25 per cent additional to
all duties, will take effect probably in thirty days.



Duty on Licorice in Venezuela. — Consul Plumacher, of Mara-
caibo, on April 18, 1899, writes that according to a recent decision
from the Venezuelan Government, licorice has been placed in the
third class of the import tariff (25 centimes, or 4.8 cents).



Argentine Tariff Changes (Correction). — Minister Buchanan
writes from Buenos Ay res, February 22, 1899, in regard to the tax
on tobacco for making sheep dip, to which reference was made in
his report of February 15.* On inquiry at the Ministry of Hacienda,
Mr. Buchanan has been informed that the change made in this year's
valuations of the custom-house, by which the class of tobacco in
question was taken from the free list and taxed 25 per cent, was an
error. The tobacco is to be admitted free, as heretofore.



Port Works at Montevideo. — Minister Finch writes from Mon-
tevideo, under date of March 28, 1899, that there appears to be an
opening for United States enterprise in the construction of the port
at that place. The cost of the work is estimated by Mr. Finch at
from J8, 000, 000 to $10,000,000. Representatives of English, Ger-
man, and French firms are endeavoring to obtain the contract, but
bids from the United States are desired. Those wishing to bid should
write to Mr. Finch in detail.



Tobacco and Vanilla Crops in Mexico. — Concul Jones, of
Tuxpan, under date of March 31, 1899, reports that he wishes to
correct statements appearing in United States newspapers, to the
effect that the tobacco and vanilla crops along the Mexican coast
north of Veracruz have been destroyed by the cold weather. Half
of the tobacco plants, says Mr. Jones, were not touched by the frost,
and 60 per cent of the vanilla vines will survive. The full text of
the report has been sent to the Department of Agriculture.



*See CoNSULAK Reports No. 225 (June, 1899), p. 345.



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584



NOTES.



Glucose in Belgium. — Consul Roosevelt, of Brussels, under date
of April 28, 1899, sends translation of a royal order to the effect that
the remission of the excise tax on glucose intended for certain indus-
trial uses, not alimentary,* will no longer be accorded.



Trade of Gold Coast. — Minister Smith, of Monrovia, under
date of March 24, 1899, gives the value of imports into the Gold
Coast colony from the United States from the 30th of June, 1897,
to February, 1899, aS;^69,i72 ($336,626). During the same period,
the exports declared for the United States were valued at ;^27,405
(5)5133,336). The exports consisted of palm oil, mahogany, monkeys,
parrots, and leopards. Twelve American vessels, with a total ton-
nage of 5,433 tons, arrived and cleared during the seven* months
under consideration.



Consular Reports Transmitted to Other Departments.— The

following reports from consular officers (originals or copies) have
been transmitted since the date of the last report to other Depart-
ments for publication or for other action thereon :



Consular officer reporting.


Date.


Subject.


Department to which re-
ferred.


E. Schnecgans, Saigon

Do


Mar. 28,1899
Apr. ii,x899
Apr. 25.1899
May 31,1899


Rice market


Department of Agriculture.
Do.


^0


Do


jAo ^


Do.


M. H. Twitchell, King-
ston, Canada.


Agricultural conditions.


Do.



•Sec Consular Rkpori-s No. 224 (May, 1899), p. 201.



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.

Commerce of Senegal. — From the Recueil Consulaire, Vol.
XCIX, Brussels, 1898, the following is taken:

The value of imports Into Senegal during the year 1897 is estimated at 25,000,000
francs ($4,825,000). Of these, Rufisque and its dependencies received 12,000,000
francs (|2,3i6,ooo); Saint Louis, 10,000,000 francs (|i,930,ooo); Dakar and Gor6e,
3,000,000 francs (|579,ooo). The chief imports are wine, spirits, biscuit, flour, tex-
tiles, and hardware. During the same year, the exports reached a total of 15,000
tons, valued at 12,000,000 francs ($2,316,000).

The principal articles of export are arachides (groundnuts) and rubber. The
harvest of groundnuts in 1897 amounted to 73,866 tons. The price varied during
the year from 17.50 francs to 19 francs (I3.38 to|3.67) per 100 kilograms (220.46
pounds).

In 1897, a new variety of India rubber was exported from Rufisque — the pro-
duct of a tree of the fig family. The juice of this tree coagulates naturally on con-
tact with the air. This rubber is less elastic than that produced by the rubber
tree proper, but it has the same general properties. The exports of this rubber
amounted to 32,000 kilograms (70,547 pounds), valued at 100,000 francs ($19,300).

Bentamar^ is the product of a native tree which grows in great quantities in
several parts of Senegal. So far, the grains have been used only to mix with
coffee and chocolate. In 1897, 50,000 kilograms (110,230 pounds) were sent to Mar-
seilles and Hamburg. It can never be used to any great extent, as the grain has
been found to contain principles injurious to health.

In December, 1897, the general assembly of the colony voted 20,000 francs
($3,860) for the creation of an agricultural mission. The following credits were
voted for Rufisque: Seventy-five thousand francs ($14,475) for the construction of a
second wharf; 60,000 francs ($11,580) for canalization; 25,000 francs ($4,825) for a
powder magazine; also 50,000 francs ($9,650) for the water main at Saint Louis.

The work of improving the port of Dakar is under discussion. Besides 60,000
francs ($11,580) voted for waterworks, and 5,000 francs ($965) for the purchase of a
crane for the port, plans are being made for the construction of wharves, a repair
dock, etc. There is talk of a railway from Thifes to Fatick; two companies are con-
sidering the establishment of coal depots, and Dakar seems destined to become one
of the most important ports of the western coast of Africa.



Railways in Tonkin.— The Revue du Commerce Ext6rieur,
Paris, May 6, 1899, has the following note relative to the projected
railways in Tonkin:

The governor-general of Indo China hag proposed to the Minister of the Col-
onies to commence work on the railways whose construction was authorized by the
law oi December 25, 1898. The line from Hanoi to Vinh will be 319 kilometers

585



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586 FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.

(198 miles) long; that from HaTphong to Vi6tri 154 kilometers (96 miles). It is esti-
mated that the total cost of the two lines will be 46,601,400 francs ($8,994,070), an
average of 98,523 francs (|i9,oi6) per kilometer, some I300 less than the estimate
made to determine the loan.

Vi6tri is situated just at the confluence of the Red River and the River Claire, and
12 kilometers northeast of the junction of the Red and Black rivers. The second
line from Hanoi Ninh-Binh will cross the delta of the Red River. But from Ninh-
Binh to Giem-Quinh it will cross two massive mountains, separated by the delta
of the Song-Ma. The first sum of 150,000,000 francs ($28,950,000) has been raised.
The credit necessary to assure the annual payment is inscribed on the general
budget of Indo China. For 1899, it amounts to 1,600,000 francs ($308,800).



Railways in Ceylon. — The Recueil Consulaire, Vol. XCIX,
Brussels, 1898, says:

The total length of railways in operation throughout the island of Ceylon in
1897 was 1,958 kilometers (1,217 miles). They traverse a most uneven country,
the altitude varying from zero at Colombo to 6,300 feet near Nanwt)ya. The first
railway constructed on the island was from Colombo to Kandy, a distance of 74
miles; the average grade was i to 45, and the cost about ;f 1,700,000 ($8,273,050).
This road was afterwards prolonged 17 miles to Nawalapitiya, and later a branch
road was built from Kandy to Metale, 17^ miles. South of Colombo, the line was
extended to Kaloutara, 27 >^ miles. In 1885, a railway was built from Nawala-
pitiya to Nanwoya, 41 }4 miles farther in the interior and situated at an altitude of
5,600 feet. In 1894, the line from Nanwoya was extended to Bandiarawela, 29
miles. The coast line has been extended from Kaboutawa to Matara, 100 miles
from Colombo. All these lines are broad gauge, but the present government seems
disposed to favor the construction of narrow-gauge roads, which will join the prin-
cipal lines and open up the chief agricultural centers of the island.



Trade Conditions in Paraguay. — The following extracts are
from a report in the Moniteur Officiel du Commerce, Paris, January
12, 1899:

On account of her geographical situation, Paraguay has no direct commercial
relations with Europe. Brazil, the Argentine, and Oriental republics are the mar-
kets from which she draws the greater part of her supplies.

Certain firms which import from Europe do it through the medium of commis-
sion merchants and on six months' credit for France and Germany, eight and nine
months for England, three months for Spain and Italy. Purchases direct from
manufactories are made payable at thirty days.

The chief imports are textiles of every kind, wines, flour, wheat, butter, potatoes,
coffee, perfumery, hardware, and iron. All articles of foreign production, in addition
to the regular duty, pay a duty of one-half of i percent, called "droit d'eslingaje,"
if they remain stored in the warehouse more than four days. The first article of
the general tariff law of December, 1892, establishes a single duty of 25 per cent
upon all merchandise introduced into Paraguay, except certain articles, such as



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS. 587

fresh fish, native fruits, cement, gold and silver, books, scientific instruments,
needles, locomotives, thoroughbred animals, sewing machines, lime, rails, cross-
beams or cylinders of wood, and pipes of zinc, which may be imported free of duty.
On linen and cotton cloths, percales, hats, and firearms, there is a duly of 20 per
cent. Ready-made clothing and wearing apparel in general, shoes, ornaments,
and harness pay a duty of 40 per cent; marbles, 10 per cent; flour, 8 per cent;
wines in barrels or casks, beer, and articles of silk, a duty of 30 per cent; jewelry
of gold and silver, as well as instruments or utensils mounted on gold or silver,
pay a duty of 5 per cent and precious stones 2 per cent.



Communications in Peru. — The Recueil Consulaire, Vol. XCVI,
Brussels, 1897, has a report on Peru, from which the following is
taken:

Two submarine cables follow the coast of Peru — the Central and South Ameri-
can Telegraph Company, from Panama to Chile, with stations at Paita and Callao,
and the West Coast of America Telegraph Company, which starts from Callao,
touches at Mollendo and Arica, and continues its route to Chile. The telegraphic
lines of the Peruvian Government have a total length of some 3,000 kilometers
(about 2,000 miles). The city of Lima is served by the Peruvian Telephone Com-
pany, which connects it with the neighboring towns of Callao, Chorrillos, Barranco,
and Miraflores. The subscription is from 5 to j}i soles (|2. 25 to $3.3?) per month.

The railways of Peru are divided into two classes — those which belong to the
Government and those which are the property of individual enterprise.

The first comprises:

First. The Central Railway, from Callao to Oroya, 220 kilometers (137 miles).
The most elevated point is the tunnel from Paso to Galera, at the height of 4,775
meters (15,014 feet). From Lima, there is a branch line foi Ancon, 38 kilometers
(24 miles).

Second. The line from Pacasmayo to Guadelupe and Jonau, 92 kilometers (57
miles).

Third. Line from Paita to Piura, 97 kilometers (60 miles).

Fourth. The narrow-gauge line from Salaverry to Trujillo and Ascope, 47 miles.

Fifth. The narrow-gauge from Chimbote to Suchiman, 32 miles.

Sixth. The line from Pisco to lea. 44 miles.

Seventh. The line from Mollendo to Arequipa, Juliaca, and Puno (318 miles).
By this route, a large transit commerce is carried on with Bolivia via Lake Titi-
caca. At Juliaca. there is a branch road to Sicuani.

The railways belonging to private corporations are:

First. The line from Lima to Callao (8.6 miles), inaugurated in 1850, belonging
to an J^nglish company.

Second. The line from Lima to Chorrillos, belonging to the same company.

Third. The line from Lima to Magdalena, a narrow-gauge road 3.7 miles long,
belonging to a French company.

Fourth. The line from Lambayeque to Pimental, opened to traffic in 1867, narrow
gauge, 15 miles long.

Fifth. The line from Eten to Ferrenafe and Patapo, 48 miles, narrow gauge-
Sixth. The line from Pura to Catacaos, 9.3 miles. Catacaos is the center of the
manufacture of the so-called Panama straw hats.



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588



FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.



These lines form altogether a network of 1,356 kilometers (843 miles) adminis-
tered by the Peruvian Government, and 214 kilometers (133 miles) managed by pri-
vate corporations. Peruvian commerce complains of the high tariff of the different
lines.

The superb roads of the Incas have long since disappeared, and away from the
railways and the vicinity of the large towns, everything is transported on the backs
of mules, llamas, or Indians.



Notes from Peru.— From the Geographical and Statistical Syn-
opsis of Peru, Lima, 1898, the following extracts are taken:

Foreigners are received and treated with the greatest cordiality in Peru; they
enjoy the same liberty for traveling as the natives, and have also the right to invoke
the protection of the habeas corpus act. With the sole condition of submission to the
laws of the country, they can enter upon any business or trade they please, so long
as they do not offend public morality, health, or security. They can dispose with
perfect freedom of their personal or landed property, denounce mines, purchase
lands in the interior, etc.

The following statistics show the increase of commerce in 1897 over that of 1896:



Description.



Imports...
Exports...



i8q6.



17.5051 148
21,862,334



$8,6x2,533
«Oi756»268



1897.



Soles.*
18,004,048
31,0351383



$8,083,818
13.930.397



*Thc value of the Peruvian sol in i8g6 was 49.2 cents and in 1897 44.9 cents, according to the esti-
mates of the United States Director of the Mint.

Much has recently been done for the improvement of roads and bridges. Callao
is to be drained and to have a new system of waterworks. Waterworks have been
made in Paita, Colan, and Trujillo. Electric-light plants are already established in
Arequipa and Cerro de Pasco. Barranco is well lighted by gas. Lima has excel-
lent systems of waterworks and sewerage. The sharp descent of the Rimac is
utilized. Brick filtering galleries are built under the bottom of the river, conduct-
ing the water in iron pipes by gravity to the distributing system, giving a constant
stream of fresh water through its whole extent.



New Franco-Italian Commercial Treaty.— The Board of
Trade Journal, London, April, 1899, gives the following statement
of the rates of duty on articles of French origin imported into
Italy, according to the new commercial agreement concluded between
that country and France. The rates previously in force are also
given. The concessions made for the articles named extend to the
United States, as well as to other countries entitled to the most-
favored-nation treatment in Italy.



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.



589



Articles.



100. CX}

XIO.OO

150.00
130.00

130.00

(t)
(«)
($)



17-37
13.03
7.7a

24.13
a.ia
5.3X

30.88
52. It



23 .'6



Wine in bottles per 100.

Brandy:

In casks and kegs... per hectoliter... 90.00

In bottles of more than half but not exceeding x liter,

per 100 90.00

In bottles containing half a liter or less. per 100... 67.50

Essence of roses per kilogram*... 40.00

Sweetmeats and preserves, with sugar or honey, per loo

kilograms. .' i25'Oo

Mustard, liquid, in powder, or prepared..per 100 kilograms... ix.oo

Spices, not specified do 27*50

Cartridges:

Empty, with caps. do 160.00

Loaded do 270.00

Medicinal preparations, not separately specified in the
tariff:
Lozenges, pills, globules, and capsules, per xoo kilo-

grams.

Wines, sirups, and elixirs per xoo kilograms..

Other kinds do

Medicines of the French Pharmacopoeia and approved
by the French Academy of Medicine are admitted on the
same terms as those of the Italian Pharmacopoeia.
Soap:

Common per 100 kilograms... 8.00 x.S4

Perfumed do 40.00 7.72

Perfumery, nonalcoholic (including the weight of imme-
diate receptacles).» per 100 kilograms...

The surtax of manufacture on alcohols in alcoholic per-
fumes will be calculated after deduction of the weight of
the immediate receptacles, whenever the importer applies
that method of calculation; in the other cases, it will be
calculated on the basis of a legal tare fixed by the Minis-
ter of Finance.

Pencils, without sheaths, excluding crayons, per 100 kilo-
grams 100.00 19.30

Shoemakers' thread of linen or hemp.. .per xoo kilograms... xio.oo ax. 23

Tissues of jute, velvety do 150.00 28.95

Galloons and braids of linen and hemp do 130.00 25.09

Buttons of linen, hemp, or other vegetable fiber, except

cotton per 100 kilograms... 130.00 25.09

Collars, cuffs, and shirts for men. of linen, hemp, or cotton,

per 100 kilograms.

Coverlets of cotton tissue, bleached or dyed, per 100 kilo-
grams

Foot rugs, unsewn, are treated as coverlets, per 100 kilo-
grams

Cotton velvets:

(a) Common and plush-
Unbleached per xoo kilograms... xao.oo 23.16

Blcached.» do 140.00 27.02

Dyed .do X65.00 31. 85

Printed ....do...... 220.00 42.46

* I kilogram =2. 2046 pounds.

t Twice the duty on the tissue.

$Duiy on the tissue, plus 50 per cent.

$ As the tissue of which made, according to class.



Old rate.



Lire.
60.00



I1X.58



New rate.



Lire.




20.00


13-86


60.00


IX.58


60.00


XI. 58


45.00


8.69


20.00


3.86


zoo. 00


19.30


8.00


1.54


25.00


4.83


75.00


14.48


200.00


38.60


xoo. 00


19.30


40.00


7.72


60.00


11.58


7.00


1.3s


3500


6.76


50.00


9.65


10.00


1.93


80.00


15.44


100.00


19.30


110.00


21.23


110.00


2X.23


iX)
100.00




19. 30


100.00


19.30


XI4.00


aa.oo


X30.00


25.09


155.00


29.92


205.00


39-57



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590



FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.



Articles.



Old rate.



Nefr rate.



Lire.
X40.00
170.00
aoo.oo
350.00
7.00
tao.oo



Z50.00
Z50.00



250.00



zgo.oo
(•)

7.00
340.00
340.00



(+)

(8)



(I)



60.00



35.00
70.00



50.00



40.00
15.00
40.00



$27.03
36.8X
38.60
48.25
X.35
33.16



19.30

38.95
38.95



48.25
43.46
36.67



1.35
46.3a
46.33



Cotton velvets — Continued.
(^) Fine-
Unbleached per 100 kilograms..

Bleached do.....

Dyed do

Printed do

Cotton lace, unbleached per kilogram..

Galloons and tapes, of cotton do

Trimmings, of cotton:

Cotton wicks for lamps and plaited wicks for candles,

per 100 kilograms.

Tassels, fringes, and trimmings for furniture, per zoo

kilograms.

Buttons, of cotton

Tissues of wool:

(a) Rasati (short napped), not fulled, of wool, pure or
mixed with silk or waste silk in a proportion of
less than 12 per cent, weighing per square meter—

900 grams or less ».per zoo kilograms...

More than 300 grams, but not more than 500

grams per 100 kilograms..

(Jf) Stuffs for furniture weighing more than 500 grams

per square meter.» per zoo kilograms...

Coverlets of wool, pure or mixed .do.....

Tulles. per kilogram..

Galloons of wool, for clothing per zoo kilograms..

Buttons of wooL

Made-up articles of wool or hair, except stays and corsets

for women..

Stays and corsets for women, of linen, hemp, cotton or wool:
Trimmed or embroidered each-
Other kinds.

Stays, simply bound with linen, hemp, or cotton tapes
are not considered as trimmed. Stays feather stitched even
with silk, for the purpose of fixing the steels, are not con-
sidered as being embroidered. Camisoles, stays, and other
similar articles of clothing, made of hosiery piece goods
(of wool) are not treated as woolen stays.
Trimmings, of which the outer part is formed of silk or silk
waste and wool, cotton, linen, or hemp, or other vegeta-
ble fibers, with the silk or silk waste, in a proportion of

less than 13 percent per zoo kilograms...

Furniture, or parts of furniture, in the rough or finished,
of cabinetmakers' wood, veneered, carved, or inlaid, up-
holstered or not per zoo kilograms...

Frames, or slips of wood for frames :

(a) Plain or carved, but not varnished, gilt, nor silvered,

per too kilograms..

(^) Other, varnished, gilt, or silvered

Penholders of wood, including those with metal tips, per

100 kilograms..

Common street carts of wood in the rough, unfinished

Paper for ornaments per 100 kilograms-
Blotting paper

Playing cards..

♦As the tissue of which made.

t Duty on the tissue with an addition of 40 per cent

X Duty on the tissue with an addition of 35 per cent

{Charged as made-up articles of the respective tissues.

I Charged as trimmings, according to material.

^ Half the duty on the finished carts.



zz.58



6.76
13.51

9.65



7.72
3.90
7.73



Lire.
133.00
160.00
190.00
335.00
5.00
zoo. 00



80.00



zoo.oo
zao.oo



zoo.oo

zoo.oo

S.oo

aao.oo

(t)

.60
.30



30.00
60.00



40.00
(t)
30.00
Z3.50
30.00



$25.48
30.88
36.67
45.36
.97
Z9.30



19.30
33.16



43.46

38.60

19.30
Z9.30
.97
4a. 46
43.46



9.65



5.79
zz.58

7.7a

5.79
2.41

5.76



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FOREIGN REPORTS AND PUBLICATIONS.



591



Articles.



Maps:

On paper or cardboard, in Aeets or in atlases, simply

bound

On linen-baclced paper, with or without rods, or bound

in atlases. per 100 kilograms...

Manufactures of paper and pasteboard not separately
specified in the tariff:
Manufactures of cardboard or sumped celluloid, com-
pressed or hardened, with or without patterns, per

zoo kilograms...

Other kinds.

Books, printed in French, with cardboard covers, even if
covered with textile material or paper, and with the title

sumped on the outside per 100 kilograms...

Hides, cut for uppers, etc

Muffs, of skins, with the hair on

Saddles

Leather portmanteaus, except those fitted with toilet arti-
cles and other traveling requisites per 100 kilograms...

Manufactures of skins, tanned, without the hair, not sep-
arately specified in the tariff. per 100 kilograms...

Utensils and instruments for arts and trades, of cast or
wrought iron or steel, common polished, varnished,
or galvanized, or coated with lead, tin, brass, or orna-
mented with any other meul per 100 kilograms...

Manufactures of nickel:

Gilt or silvered do ,

Other kinds.- do......

Gold, beaten in leaves (without deducting the weight of

the paper). per kilogram..,

Cement and hydraulic lime per 100 kilograms..,

Tiles, of terra cotu do

Oranges and lemons (also in brine)... do ,

Dates do



-Beans, pease, mushrooms, and asparagus in oil, salt, or



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