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United States. Dept. of State. Office of Public Co.

Department of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) online

. (page 55 of 116)
Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) → online text (page 55 of 116)
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without publicity. This reflects the normal de-
velopment and refinement of good relations among
nations geographically closely related, which have
been activel}' working over a period of years at the
task of maintaining peace in the Western
Hemisphere.



North Atlantic TreatyвАФ Product of the Cold War

The North Atlantic Treaty, unlike the Rio pact,
w^is not envisioned prior to the formulation and
signature of the United Nations Charter. Had
the United Nations, in its first years of existence,
achieved the expected immediate objectives, the
Atlantic pact might never have been conceived.
The North Atlantic Treaty does not, however, owe
its existence to any basic lack or deficiency in the
terms or machinery of the United Nations Charter.
Rather, the willful refusal of the Soviet Union
and its satellites to cooperate in the hoped-for
implementation of that Charter has made neces-
sary dramatic action to help achieve the funda-
mental objective of the United Nations Charter,
the preservation of peace.

By the Soviet Union's abuse of the veto, its un-
willingness to cooperate in arms reduction and in
the control of atomic weapons, by its active efforts,
sometimes successful, tyrannically to dominate
free countries by force and threat of force, the
Soviet Union is threatening the very structure of
the United Nations Charter and subverting its
provisions and machinery.

The North Atlantic Treaty is clearly, then, the
product of the cold war. It results from a justi-
fiable fear that the Soviet intentions are to raise
the temperature of that war when it suits their
convenience to turn on the "hot war" faucet. The
nations of Western Europe, emerging from the
devastation and material poverty caused by World
War II, were struggling for economic recovery,
political stability, and the maintenance of free
institutions. They found themselves menaced ex-



792



Department of State Bulletin



Lernnlly from the East by an a^-^ressive military
power bent on doniinution. They found them-
selves nienacetl internally by Conummist parties
aetinjj: in blind obedience to tliat af;



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) → online text (page 55 of 116)