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United States. Dept. of State. Office of Public Co.

Department of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) online

. (page 60 of 116)
Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) → online text (page 60 of 116)
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Agricultural tools were bound on the free list.
Liberia reduced its duties on tobacco leaf; com-
pressed, liquefied, and solidified gases ; toilet soap ;
cotton remnants and certain manufactures of cot-
ton; certain rubber products; cigars, lubricating
oils; lamps and lanterns (except electric); and
dental supplies. Liberia bound against increase
its moderate duties on condensed, evaporated and
dried milk; rice; wheat flour; passenger automo-
biles and motor trucks ; mining, refrigerating, in-
dustrial and roadbuilding machinery; cotton
cloth ; and cigarettes.

The United States bound the duty-free status of
latex ; palm oil ; and palmyra, piassava, and palm-
leaf fibers.

The United States concessions will be put into
effect by Presidential proclamation in accordance
with the Trade Agreements Act of 1934 as
amended.



ITALY

[Released to the press May l'\

Italy, on April 30, 1950, signed the Annecy Pro-
tocol of Terms of Accession to the General Agree-
ment on Tariffs and Trade and has taken the other
steps necessary to become a contracting party to
the Agreement. Under the provisions of the pro-
tocol, the two Governments are obligated to make
their concessions effective 30 days after the above
actions have been taken, on May 30, 1950.

The United States concessions will be put into
effect by Presidential proclamation in accordance
with the Trade Agreements Act of 1934 as
amended.

The most important concessions granted by
Italy to the United States at Annecy were on agri-
cultural products. These included cotton, wheat,
powdered milk, lard, soybean oil, and prunes, all
of which have figured significantly in United



816



Department of Slate Bulletin



States trade witli Italy in recent j'eais. The duty
on raw cotton was reduced from the 1938 level of
32 percent ad valorem to C percent ; powdered
milk from X\ to 18 percent ; prunes from Ci) to 15
percent; lard from 33 to 25 percent; soybean oil
from !15 to 25 percent. Leaf tobacco, another very
imjiorlant export to Italy, was bound on the free
list. In the industrial Held, substantial reductions
were granted by Italy on tires and tubes, type-
writers, cash registers, large radios, track-laying
tractors, passenger cai-s, and trucks. The duties
on passenger cars and trucks were reduced from
the 1937 level of over 100 percent. On some cate-
gories of these vehicles, the Italian duties were
reduced to 35 percent, and on other categories to
40 percent. Duties on typewritei-s and cash reg-
isters were reduced by about 50 percent and 65
percent, respectively.

The United States granted reductions on : olive
oil (duty was reduced from 80 to 4%0 per pound
on that in small containers) ; lemons, from 21/2^ to
1%



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) → online text (page 60 of 116)