Copyright
United States. Dept. of State. Office of Public Co.

Department of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) online

. (page 71 of 116)
Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) → online text (page 71 of 116)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


contemplated from the unexpended balance of
China aid funds.

It is not possible to generalize on aid to the area
as a whole as recommendations for each area were



different. However, agricultural aid, health im-
piovi'iiient, and traiisportatioii facilities keyed to
food supply and economic rehal)ilitation were gen-
eral to all of Southeast Asia.



Department Sees Turkish Elections
as Victory for Democracy

[Released to the press May 16]

The elections which took place on May 14 in
Turkey, as they represent the free will of the
Turkish people, are an inspiring victory for
democracy.

In the short period of 26 years since the found-
ing of the Turkish Republic, the Turkish people,
emerging from over 600 years of absolute rule
under the Ottoman Sultans, have evolved from
one-party rule to the multiparty system and the
present freedom to choose their own leaders.
That this result has been accoiiiplislied can bo
attributed largely to the leaders of the Peoples
Party, Kemal Ataturk, who gave impetus to the
development of democracy, and to Ismet Inonu,
his successor as President of the Turkish Republic,
during whose administration opposition parties
were permitted to be formed.

An electoral law passed in February 1950 as-
sured the free expression of the will of the jjcople
in the elections which have just taken place. The
part that President Inonu has played in guiding
his countrymen to democratic government in an
atmosphere of freedom and calm has earned him
the respect of the democratic peoples of the world.
The United States is confideiit that the new (iov-
ernment in Turkey will carry on the democratic
tradition developed during his administration.

This Government has been gratified by the very
friendly and close relations that have existed be-
tween the peoples of Turkey and the United States
and between the Governments of the two countries.
It is looking forward with confidence to a con-
tinuance of these relations, based as they are on
mutual understanding and common aims.



STATEMENT BY ACTING SECRETARY WEBB

[Released to the press May 19]

An event took place in Turkey on May 14 which
deserves special coniment. On that day over 80
percent of the eligible voters in Turkey, whose
constitution guarantees universal suffrage, went
to the polls to elect their representatives in the
Grand National Assembly. That a large per-
centage of the representatives which they chose
belong to the leading opposition party is not the
most significant aspect of these elections. Rather,



May 29, 1950



869



it is the fact that these elections, conducted in an
atmosphere of freedom and calm, represent the
culmination of democratic evolution in this new
Eepublic which only 26 years ago was established
on the ruins of the Ottoman Empire.

This evolution which led to the establisliment
of the multiparty system shortly after the end of
World War II and to the preparation, with the
collaboration of the major political parties, of a
new electoral law, is particularly noteworthy in
the light of the troubled international situation
which has weighed so heavily upon Turkey. Un-
der the electoral law, the elections of May 14, the
first in which fully organized political parties
participated, were carried out in a manner that



would do credit to any of the Western democra-
cies whose democratic traditions and institutions
have been developing over a much longer period
of time.

The election platform of the Democratic Party
and the public utterances of its leaders indicate
that there will be no change in the foreign policy
of the country as a result of the elections and that
Turkey remains unalterably opposed to commu-
nism.

The United States congratulates Turkey on the
conduct of these elections and in particular. Presi-
dent Inonu, whose inspiration is in large part
responsible for the very existence of the opposi-
tion political parties.



Nonimmigrant Passport Visa Fee Agreements With Mexico



An agreement has been reached with the Government
of the United Mexican States for the reciprocal reduction
and waiver of nonimmigrant passport visa fees for certain
American and Mexican citizens.

The agreement was accomplished hy an exchange of
notes at Mexico City today between Ambassador Walter
Thurston and the Acting Minister of Foreign Relations,
Senor Don Manuel Tello.

Texts of the exchange of notes, released to the press on
May 3, follow :



terminated unilaterally by written notice given ninety
days in advance.

Accept, Excellency, the renewed assurances of my
highest and most distinguished consideration.

As proposed in Your Excellency's note, the
Government of the United States will put this
schedule into effect on June 1, 1950.

Please accept [etc.].



U.S. NOTE OF MAY 3, 1950



[No. 4398]



Excellency : I have the honor to acknowledge
the receipt of Your Excellency's note of today's
date concerning the establishment on a reciprocal
basis of fees for the documentation of citizens of
Mexico traveling to the United States for tem-
porary periods and of citizens of the United States
traveling similarly to Mexico, and reading as
follows:

As a result of conversations recently held in this Capital
between American and Mexican officials with the object
of arriving at an agreement for the establishment on a
reciprocal basis of fees for the documentation of citizens
of Mexico traveling to the United States for temporary
periods and citizens of the United States traveling simi-
larly to Mexico, I have the honor to advise Your Excellency
that the Government of the United Mexican States is dis-
posed, subject to the agreement of Your Excellency's
Government, to establish the following schedule of fees on
June 1, 19.'50, to replace the one provided for in the ex-
change of notes between the Embassy and the Ministry,
dated Octol)er 6 and 7, 1925 :

[Schedule of fees follows texts of notes]
This schedule may be amended by mutual agreement
through exchange of notes and will remain in force until



MEXICAN NOTE OF MAY 3, 1950

Excellency: I have the honor to refer to the
Embassy's courteous note No. 4398 of today's date
supplementing the Agi-eement concerning the doc-
umentation of citizens of Mexico traveling to the
United States for temporary periods and of citi-
zens of the United States traveling similai'ly to
Mexico, which will enter into force on June 1,
1950.

With regard to the first point in Your Excel-
lency's communication, I am pleased to note that
the Government of the United States, in the event
that the Government of Mexico decides to cease
issuing passports to its nationals who go to the
United States for temporary visits, will document
such nationals provided that they are in possession
of documents to prove their nationality so that
they may be readmitted upon returning to Mexico.
In the event that this development takes place,
the Government of Mexico will inform the Gov-
ernment of the United States sixty days in
advance.

I note likewise that the Government of the
United States, like the Government of Mexico,



870



Department of State Bulletin



will permit tourists, transients or visitors {visi-
tantes) to take their automobiles with them when
they so desire subject to tlie Customs Regulations
of the respective countries.

The (lovernment of Mexico agrees that, among
the persons comprehended under the provisions of
Article IJ of the Agreement arrived at by the
exchange of notes of today's date, there shall be
included all those nationals of the one country
proceeding to the territory of the other on business
trips of whatever nature, provided they are lawful
and temporary in character, as a resvdt of which
the pei-sons documented in accordance with the
provisions of the Article cited will include : travel-
ing salesmen, officials of agricultural, industrial,
connnercial and mining institutions, et cetera, who
are nationals of one of the countries and who are
going to the territory of the other to enter into
business contracts or to confer with their asso-
ciates; to nationals of the one country who travel
to the territory of the other to promote or to con-
clude commercial transactions; and to other per-
sons who are traveling in similar circumstances.
With respect to the applications of other pei-sons
who wish to enter to engage in any remunerated
work or employment, they will be treated in ac-
cordance with the provisions of Article 10 of the
Agreement, subject to the laws of our respective
Governments, such cases to be handled as expe-
ditiously as possible.

In accordance with Article 2 of the Agreement,
it is understood that American citizen transients
who wish to pass through Mexican territory will
be documented with tourist cards in accordance
with the provisions of Article 50, Section I, of the
Ley General de Poblacicn and that Mexican citi-
zen transients who desire to pass through the ter-
ritory of the United States will be granted visas
in their passports as nonimmigrants in accordance
with Section 3 (2) or 3 (3) of the Immigration
Act of 1924,

The diplomatic and consular representatives of
our respective Governments will be authorized to
document, on their own responsibility, applicants
who apply under the provisions of any section of
the Agreement except Sections 6 and 10.

In view of the fact that the procedure for grant-
ing visas in accordance with Articles 6 and 10, to
which reference is made above, is not considered
to be covered by the Agreement, the Government
of Mexico understands that the Government of
the United States reserves the right to require that
all applications for visas presented under the pro-
visions of Article 6 may be referred to the De-
partment of State before being approved.

Your Excellency is advised that I am aware that
the period of validity of an American visa refers
only to the period within which it may be used in
connection with an application for admission at a
port of entry to the United States and its posses-
sions and not to the period of stay in the United
States which is granted to the bearer in case he



is admitted. The period of each stay will con-
tinue iis at present to be determined by the Ameri-
can Immigration authorities.

On its part the Government of Mexico wishes
to have it undei-stood that with respect to the
cards that are issued to tourists and visitors (visi-
tantes) of American nationality, the same will
have a validity of ninety days during which they
may be presented at ports of entry to Mexico and
that the period of stay which is granted to the
bearers in case they are admitted will continue to
be determined as at present by the Mexican Immi-
gration authorities.

I wish to avail myself of this opportunity to
reiterate to Your Excellency the assurances of
my highest and most distinguished consideration.

Mi^NUEL Tello



U.S. NOTE OF MAY 3, 1950

[No. 4399]

Excellency: I have the honor to refer to the
exchange of notes of today's date between the
Ministry for Foreign Relations and the Embassy
for the establishment of fees on a reciprocal basis
for the documentation of citizens of Mexico trav-
eling to the United States for temporary periods
and citizens of the United States traveling sim-
ilarly to Mexico.

The Government of the United States is de-
sirous of recording the following additional
understandings :

In accordance with Your Excellency's sugges-
tion, I understand that the Government of Mexico
may wish at some future date to discontinue the
issuance of passports to its citizens who will travel
to the United States but that it will continue its
present practice of issuing passports until such
time as it may deem opportune to make a change.
If the Government of Mexico should decide to dis-
continue the issuance of passports, the Govern-
ment of the United States would interaose no ob-
jection on the understanding that the Government
of Mexico will inform the Government of the
United States sixty days in advance, indicating
at the same time the document or documents with
which Mexican citizens will be provided to prove
nationality and identity so that they may be re-
admitted upon returning to Mexico.

Each Government will permit the nationals of
the other who enter their respective territories as
tourists, transients, or visitors {visi f antes) to take
their automobiles with them temiK)rarily when
they so desire in accordance with the Customs reg-
ulations of the respective countries.

It is understood that the persons coming within
the provisions of Section 3 of the Agreement ar-
rived at by the exchange of notes of today's date
shall include all nationals of the one country pro-
ceeding to the territoiy of the other for the trans-



May 29, 1950



871



action of business of whatever kind, provided it
is lawful and temporary in character. Persons
documented under Section 3 will therefore include
traveling salesmen ; officials of agricultural, indus-
trial, commercial, mining or other institutions wlio
are nationals of the one country visiting in the
territory of the other to negotiate business con-
tracts or to confer with business associates; na-
tionals of the one country traveling to the terri-
tory of the other to promote or conclude business
transactions; and persons traveling in similar cir-
cumstances. The applications of other persons
who seek to enter to do work for compensation
or accept remunerative employment will be
treated in accordance with the provisions of Sec-
tion 10 and such cases will be handled in accord-
ance with the laws of our respective Governments
and be given the most expeditious treatment
Ijossible.

It is understood that, in accordance with Sec-
tion 2 of the Agreement, a transient will be docu-
mented with a tourist card under Article 50, Sec-
tion 1, of the Ley General de Poblacion in the case
of an American citizen passing through Mexico,
and with a nonimmigrant passport visa under Sec-
tion 3(2) or 3(3) of the Immigration Act of 1924
in the case of a JNIexican citizen passing through
the United States.

The procedure for granting visas under Sec-
tions 6 and 10 of the Agreement is outside the
scope of the Agreement. The Government of the
United States reserves the right to require that all
applications for visas contemplated in Section 6
be referred to the Department of State before is-
suance. Diplomatic and consular representatives
of our respective Governments will be authorized
to document on tlieir own responsibility appli-
cants who are comprehended under the provisions



of any section of the Agreement excepting Sec-
tions 6 and 10.

In conclusion, I desire to invite Your Excel-
lency's attention to the fact that the period of
validity of an American visa relates only to the
period within which it may be used in connection
with an application for admission at a port of
entry into the United States and its possessions,
and not to the length of stay in the United States
which may be permitted the bearer should he be
admitted. The period of each stay would as at
present, continue to be determined by the immi-
gration authorities.

I avail myself of this opportmiity to renew to
Your Excellency the assurances of my highest and
most distinguished consideration.



U.S. NOTE OF MAY 3, 1950

[No. 4439]

Excellency: I have the honor to advise Your
Excellency that I have been instructed by the
Department of State to express the gratification
of the Government of the United States over the
completion of the new Agreement for the re-
ciprocal waiver and reduction of visa fees which
was effected by our exchange of notes of today's
date. However, the Department of State regrets
that it was not possible to incorporate into the
Agreement a provision permitting in most cases
more than a single entry on each visa, tourist card
or visitante card issued in accordance with its
terms. The Department lias instructed me to ex-
press to Your Excellency the hope that the Agree-
ment may soon be amended so as to incorporate
this provision.

Please accept [etc.]



Mexican Fees



American Fees



[AU amounts quoted in U.S. dollars']



1. AccrecUtecl official of the United States Government,
his family, attendants, servants, and employees. Official
passport visa under Article 37 of the Ley Ocneral de
Pohlncion valid for presentation within a period of 12
months and for an unlimited number of entries.

Fee : Gratis

2. American citizen entering Mexico solely for pleasure
or in transit. Tourist card under Article 50, Section I,
valid for presentation within a period of three months
from the date of issue and for a single entry.

Fee: $3.00

3. American citizen entering Mexico on business. T'l'.si-
tante card under Article .TO, Section III, valid for pre-
sentation within a period of three months from the date of
issue and for a single entry.

Fee: $3.00

4. American citizen entering Mexico for the purpose of
inspecting .shipments of fruits, vegetables, and moats
destined for the United States market. Visitante card
und(!r Article 50, Section III, valid for presentation wllliin
a perind of tliree months from date of issue and for an
unlimited number of entries and departures within a



1. Accredited official of the Mexican Government, his
family, attendants, servants, and employees. Official
passport visa under Section 3 (1) of the Immigration
Act of 1924, valid for 12 months, unlimited number of
applications for entry.

Fee : Gratis

2. Mexican citizen jiroceeding to the United States solel.v
for pleasure or in transit. Nonimmigrant passport visa
under Section 3 (2) or 3 (3) valid for presentation
within a period of three months from the date of issue and
for a single application for entry.

Fee: $3.00

3. Mexican citizen proceeding to the United States on
business. Nonimmigrant passport visa under Section
3 (2), valid for presentation within a period of three
months from the date of issue and for a single application
for entrv.

Fee: .$3.00

4. Mexican citizen proceeding to the United States for
tlie purpose of inspecting shipments of fruits, vegetables,
and meats destined for Mexican markets. Non-immi-
gi-ant passiiort visa under Section .'5 (2), valid for i)re-
sentation within six months from the date of Issue and



872



Department of State Bulletin



Mexican Fees — Continued

period of six mouths, counting from the date of first entry.
Fee: $3.00

r>. Amerionii citizen who is entering Mexico for the pur-
|)ose of study for ii p«>riod of not more tlian months are not covered hy this Agreement.)
Fee: $3.00

6. American citizen who is a member of the crow of an
aircraft belonging to a company authorized as a com-
mercial carrier in Mexico. VUiUinte card under Article
r>0. Section III, valid for presentation within a period of
three months from the date of issue and for an unlimited
number of entries and departures within a period of six
months, counting from the date of first entry.

Fee: $3.00

7. American seaman who is a member of the crew of a
vessel entering a Mexican port. No visa required pro-
vided seaman is included in crewlist visa issued to the
Master of the vessel.

(Fee for crew-list visa not covered by this Agreement.)

S. American citizen who is a representative in or to, or an
official or employee of an international organization of
which the United States and Mexico are members, his
family, attendants, servants, and employees. Official visa
under Article 37. valid for presentation within a period
of 12 months and for an unlimited number of entries.
Fee: Gratis

9. American citizen who lives near the International
Border and who desires to cross the Border periodically
or habitually for pleasure for 72 hours or less, destined
to points within the Mexican "Border area." No immi-
gration documentation required.

(Tlie Mexican Government reserves the right to institute
the requirement of Border crossing cards which will be
is-sued on a reciprocal basis without fee if and when
instituted.)

10. Not covered in this .\greement will be an American
citizen who is a professional artist or sjwrtsman. a pro-
fessor in an institution of learning or an official or em-
plo.vee of an agricultural, industrial, commercial, or
mining institution, et cetera, who is coming to Mexico
to do work for compensation or accept remunerative em-
plo.vment up to six months. Visitnnte card under Article
50, Section III, subject to the prior approval of the 5Iin-
istry of Governacion, valid for presentation within a
period of three months from the date of issue and for a
single entry, subject to revalidation at the discretion of
the Ministry of Governacion for a single period of six
months, counting from tlie date of expiration of the im-
migration document involved.

Fee: .'?41..';o



American Fees — Continued

an unlimited number of applications for entry within that
period.
Pee: $3.00

5. Mexican citizen proceeding to the United States for the
purpo.se of study for a jx'riod of not more than 6 months.
NoM-immigrant passport visa under Section 3 (2), valid
for iiresentation within a period of three months from the
date of i.ssue and for a single application for entry.
(Students entering for more than months are not cov-
ered by this Agreement.)

Fee: $3.00

6. Mexican citizen who is a member of the crew of an
aircraft belonging to a company authorized as a commer-
cial carrier in the United States. Non-immigrant pass-
port visa under Section 3 (5), valid for presentation
within six months from the date of issue and an unlim-
ited number of applications for entry within that period.

Fee: $3.00

7. Mexican seaman who is a member of the crew of a
vessel entering an American port. No visa required pro-
vided seaman is inchided in crewlist visa issued to the
Master of the vessel.

(Fee for crew-list visa not covered by this Agreement)

8. Mexican citizen who is a representative in or to, or an
official or employee of an Intel-national organization of
which the United States and Mexico are members, his
family, attendants, servants, and employees. Non-immi-
grant passport visa under Section (3)7), valid for 12
months, unlimited number of applications for entry.

Fee : Gratis

9. Mexican citizen who lives near the International Bor-
der and who crosses the Border periodically or habitually
for pleasure, destined to Border or nearby points for
periods of 72 hours or less. Border crossing identifica-
tion card will be issued in lieu of passport visa without
the payment of any fee.

10. Not covered in this Agreement will be a Mexican citi-
zen who is a professional artist or sportsman who is
proceeding to the United States for remunerative appear-
ances under contract. Non-immigrant passport visa un-
der Section 3(2), valid for 12 months, unlimited number
of applications for entry or immigration visa under Sec-
tion 4.

Fee : $10.00, subject to change without notice.

Not covered in this Agreement will be a Mexican citizen
who is a professor in an institution of learning or an
official or employee of an agricultural, industrial, com-
mercial, or mining institution, et cetera, who is proceeding
to the United States to accept employment and who will
be considered to be an immigrant.
Fee: $10.00, subject to change without notice.



Peace Insurance-



-Continued from page 863



vested interests? That is the problem. It arises in
a new setting. But, the key to sokition is old.
George Washington put it this way :

Individuals entering into society, must give up a share
of liberty to preserve the rest. The magnitude of the
sacrifice must depend as well on situation and circum-
stance, as on the object to be attained.

The situation and circumstance of our time re-
quire that certain enjoyments and prerogatives
should, to a small degree, be temporarily foregone
if we are to preserve the great body of freedom.

That is not a prospect which should dismay us.



Americans are endowed with great competitive
spirit. We welcome challenges from any quarter,
and we eagerly organize, and train, aiul discipline
ourselves to win. We are full of confidence; and,
as far as Soviet Russia is concerned, we have rea-
son to be confident. We have shown, in every field,
the capacity to do better. The Russians have now
invented a new political game. They call it "not
war, not peace." It is a tough game. They hope,
by winning it, to take over the domination of the



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 22, Apr- Jun 1950) → online text (page 71 of 116)