United States. Dept. of State. Office of Public Co.

Department of State bulletin (Volume v. 46, Jan- Mar 1962) online

. (page 95 of 101)
Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 46, Jan- Mar 1962) → online text (page 95 of 101)
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world and not lastly the people of their own country with
these weapons, the monopolists profit from (he construc-
tion of shelters against such weapons and in this manner
the monopolies trim the income of the population and
mercilessly exploit the peoples.

It appears that all the talk about humanitarianism and
love for one's follow man ceases immediately as soon as
the question of the monopolies' profits arises.

You and your allies in aggressive blocs justify your
decision to begin new nuclear tests with references to the
Soviet Union's having conducted such tests. This argu-
ment does not stand up because the whole world knows
it was (he Uni(cd S(ates of America which was the first
to make the atom bomb and that the first nuclear tests
were also conducted by the United States of America.
Moreover, the United States has not only tested in the
atmosphere bu( has also exploded atom boinl)s over the



Japanese cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. It was pre-
cisely the United States and no one else who compelled the
Soviet Union to embark on the creation and accumulation
of nuclear weapons for the purpose of ensuring its se-
curity. Therefore, if one is to be logical and if one is
to strive sincerely for mutual understanding and agree-
ment on disarmament on the basis of equality, it is cec-es-
sary to recognize that the Soviet Union should be the
last to terminate nuclear weapon tests. The tests con-
ducted by the Soviet Union were from the very beginning
merely actions in response to the nuclear arras race
imposed by the Western powers.

In your statement, Mr. President, you said that the
United States would begin tests in the atmosphere in the
latter part of April. But in fact you have already given
the order to begin tests and you are delaying them by
six or eight weeks apparently only for the purpo.se of
somehow preparing the world public to swallow this
bitter pill.

Of course you yourself understand that, if the United
States begins experimental explosions of nuclear weapons,
then the Soviet Union, in the interest of ensuring its
security and world peace, will unquestionably be com-
pelled to respond to this too by conducting a series of
new tests of its own. And we do have the technical
capabilities for this, and they are at least equal to yours.
Consequentl.v, with your tests you will start a new stage
in the race in the creation of deadly weapons. But we
would like to compete with the United States and other
countries in the creation of better conditions for the peace-
ful life of mankind, and we would like to unite efforts
with you in the cause of ensuring peace throughout the
world.

The decision of the United States Government to con-
duct a new series of nuclear tests spurs on the perfecting
and the stockpiling of precisely those types of modem
weapons which represent the greatest danger : atomic and
hydrogen bombs, nuclear warheads for rockets, and
rockets themselves. But, one may ask, what is then to be
negotiated in disarmament negotiations? Is it perhaps
how many machine guns and rifles should be scrapped,
or by how many soldiers we should reduce the guards
around the arsenals where ever greater stockpiles of nu-
clear and rocket weapons will continue to accumulate?

Perhaps the Soviet Union Is expected to give an answer
as to whether it is prepared, before the United States
begins its nuclear tests in April, to agree to the provisions
already rejected by us вАФ of a treaty that would, under
the guise of international control over the cessation of
tests, lead to the creation of a ramified system of intelli-
gence and espionage? I hope that this is not cxpe



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 46, Jan- Mar 1962) → online text (page 95 of 101)