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he must be returned safely, promptly and
unconditionally.

— Space activities and their results are to
be reported for the benefit of all.

— Each country is to avoid harmfully con-
taminating outer space and adversely chang-
ing the environment of the Earth by intro-
ducing extra-terrestrial matter.

These and other provisions of the Treaty
are described in detail in the accompanying
report of the Secretary of State.^

Ill

Space exploration has become an intimate
part of our lives. The exploits of men and
machines in outer space excite and thrill us
all. The valiant young men who have become
symbolic of our national effort as Astronauts
are close to every American family. The
deaths in line of duty of Lieutenant Colonel
Virgil Grissom, Lieutenant Colonel Edward
White and Lieutenant Commander Roger
Chaffee touched every American home and
heart.

Yet, we must remember that these are only
primitive years in the epoch of space explora-
tion and utilization — an epoch that will run
to the end of time. In the next decade and in
all the decades to come, the capabilities of
nations in space will multiply far beyond our
comprehension today. If we should flag or
falter in our support of this great extension
of human knowledge, the concern and anxiety



' Not printed here.



we felt so keenly a decade ago would be
known again to other Americans in future
times.

When we ask what this nation or any na-
tion expects to find from exploration in space, ^'
the answer is one word: knowledge — knowl-
edge we shall need to maintain Earth as a
habitable environment for man.

The resources of this planet are already
taxed to support human existence. Now and
even more each day, as the family of man
increases so rapidly, fertile soil, clear water,
clean air and a safe atmosphere all become
more precious to men and nations than the
metals and jewels of ages past.

The quest for gold and silver, and dia-
monds and rubies, once led men to explore the
Earth seeking enrichment for themselves and
their nations. So now the realities of this and
future ages require that nations pursue
together the exploration of space within this
galaxy, seeking new knowledge and new
capabilities to enrich the life of all mankind.

The future leaves no option. Responsible
men must push forward in the exploration of
space, near and far. Their voyages must be
made in peace for purposes of peace on
earth. This Treaty is a step — a first step, but
a long step — toward assuring the peace es-
sential for the longer journey.

I strongly recommend — in appropriate
commemoration of the Senate's own role in
charting the course that the world now seems
willing to follow — that the Senate act
promptly in giving consent to the ratification
of this Treaty. I hope that I may be able to
afiirm as President of the United States, what
I said as a Senator to the United Nations in
1958:

"On the goal of dedicating outer space to
peaceful purposes for the benefit of all man-
kind, there are no differences within our gov-
ernment, between our parties or among our
people."

Lyndon B. Johnson

The White House, February 7, 1967.



388



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN



TREATY INFORMATION



U.S. and Israel Conclude

New Cotton Textile Agreement

Press release 20 dated February 3

DEPARTMENT ANNOUNCEMENT

The text of a new 4-year bilateral cotton
textile agreement covering the exports of
Israel's cotton textiles to the United States
for the period October 1, 1966, through
September 30, 1970, which was signed on
January 27, 1967, in Washington, was made
public on February 2. This agreement re-
places the bilateral cotton textile agreement
effected by an exchange of notes on November
5, 1963, and November 22, 1963.i The new
agreement was effected by an exchange of
notes signed by Assistant Secretary for Eco-
nomic Affairs Anthony M. Solomon for the
U.S. Government and the Ambassador of
Israel, Avraham Harman, for the Govern-
ment of Israel.

The main features of the new agreement
are:

1. The aggregate limit for the first year
of the agreement is 23 million square yards
equivalent. This limit as well as other limits
in the agreement will be increased by 5 per-
cent for the second and subsequent years of
the agreement.

2. The group limit applicable for the first
agreement year for yarns (group I, cate-
gories 1-4) is 11.5 million square yards
equivalent; for fabrics and miscellaneous
(group II, categories 5-38 and 64), 7.5 mil-
lion square yards equivalent ; and for apparel
(group III, categories 39-63), 4 million
square yards equivalent.

3. Specific ceilings have been provided for
carded yarn, singles and plied; combed yarn.



singles; carded and combed sheeting; carded
and combed twills and sateens; carded and
combed woven fabrics in categories 26 and
27; raincoats; knit wearing apparel; and cate-
gory 64, miscellaneous.

4. Other provisions on flexibility, undue
concentration, spacing, exchange of statistics,
categories and conversion factors, consulta-
tion, administrative arrangements, equity,
termination, relationship to the Geneva
Long-Term Arrangement, and some special
provisions are also included.



TEXT OF U.S. NOTE

January 27, 1967
Excellency: I have the honor to refer to recent
discussions held in Washington between representa-
tives of the Government of the United States of
America and the Government of Israel concerning
the cotton textiles agreement between our two Gov-
ernments effected by an exchange of notes signed
at Tel Aviv and Jerusalem November 5 and 22,
1963, an amendment to that agreement effected by
an exchange of notes signed at Washington June 30,
1966,'' and the Long Term Arrangements Regarding
International Trade in Cotton Textiles done at
Geneva on February 9, 1962 (hereinafter referred
to as the Long Term Arrangements). In accordance
with these discussions, the Government of the United
States of America understands that the agreement,
but not the amendment, which provides a one-time
allowance extending through December 31, 1966, is
replaced as of October 1, 1966 with the following
new agreement:

1. The term of this agreement shall be from
October 1, 1966 through September 30, 1970. Dur-
ing the term of this agreement the Government of
Israel shall limit annual exports of cotton textiles
from Israel to the United States to aggregate, group
and specific limits at the levels specified in the fol-
lowing parag^raphs.

2. For the first agreement year, constituting the
12-month period beginning October 1, 1966, the ag-
gregate limit shall be 23 million square yards equiv-
alent.

3. Within the aggregate limit, the following group
limits shall apply for the first agreement year:



' Treaties and Other International Acts Series
5491.
' For text, see Bulletin of Aug. 1, 1966, p. 189.



MARCH 6, 1967



389



In Million

Square Yards

Equivalent

Group I Yarn (Categories 1-4) 11.5
Group II Fabric and Miscellaneous

(Categories 5-38 and 64) 7.5

Group III Apparel (Categories 39-63) 4

4. Within the aggregate limit and the applicable
group limits, the following specific limits shall apply
for the first agreement year:



Group I Yam






Category 1/2


2,150,000


pounds (9,890,000 square
yards equivalent)
(of which exports
in Category 2
may not exceed
100,000 pounds)
(460,000 square
yards equiva-
lent).


Category 3


350,000


pounds (1,610,000 square
yards equiva-
lent).


Group II Fabrics and




Miscellaneous




Category 9/10


1 million square yards


Category 22/23


2


t H «


Category 26/27


2.5


( (t tl


(of which ex-






ports in duck






may not exceed






1.75 million






square yards)






Category 64


220,000


pounds (1,012,000 square
yards equiva-
lent).

In Square Yards
Equivalent


Group III Apparel




Category 48


30,098


dozens 1,504,900


Category 52


25,000


363,250


Category 53


10,000


453,000


Category 62


220,000


pounds 1,012,000


Category 63


100,000


pounds 460,000



5. Within the aggregate limit, the limits for
Groups I and II may be exceeded by not more than
10 percent, and the limit for Group III may be
exceeded by not more than 5 percent. Within the
applicable group limit, as it may be adjusted under
this provision, specific limits may be exceeded by
not more than 5 percent.

6. Within group limits for each group the square
yard equivalent of any shortfalls occurring in ex-
ports in the categories given specific limits may be
used in any category not given a specific limit. In
the event the Government of Israel desires to per-
mit exports during any agreement year of more



390



than the level of the consultation limit in any cate-
gory not having a specific limit, the Government of
Israel shall request consultations with the Govern-
ment of the United States of America on this ques-
tion. For the first agreement year the level of the
consultation limit for Category 4 and for each cate-
gory in Group II not having a specific limit shall
be 500,000 square yards equivalent, and for each
category in Group III not having a specific limit
shall be 300,000 square yards equivalent. The Gov-
ernment of the United States of America shall enter
into such consultations and, during the course
thereof, shall provide the Government of Israel with
information on the condition of the United States
market in the category in question. Until agreement
is reached, the Government of Israel shall continue
to limit exports in that category for that agreement
year to the consultation limit.

7. The Government of Israel shall use its best
efforts to space exports from Israel to the United
States within each category evenly throughout the
agreement year, taking into consideration normal
seasonal factors.

8. Ir, the second and succeeding 12-month periods
for which any limitations are in force under this
agreement, the level of exports permitted under
such limitations shall be increased by 5 percent of
the corresponding levels for the preceding 12-month
period, the latter levels not to include any adjust-
ments under paragraph 5 above.

9. The two Governments recognize that the suc-
cessful implementation of this agreement depends
in large part upon mutual cooperation on statistical
questions. The Government of the United States of
America shall promptly supply the Government of
Israel vidth monthly data on the import of cotton
textiles from Israel. The Government of Israel shall
promptly supply the Government of the United
States of America with data on monthly exports of
cotton textiles to the United States. Each Govern-
ment agrees to supply promptly any other avail-
able relevant statistical data requested by the other
Government.

10. In the implementation of this agreement, the
system of categories and the rates of conversion
into square yard equivalents listed in Annex A
hereto shall apply. In any situation where the de-
termination of an article to be a cotton textile
would be affected by whether the criterion provided
for in Article 9 of the Long Term Arrangements
is used or the ciiterion provided for in paragraph
2 of Annex E of the Long Term Arrangements is
used, the criterion provided for in the latter shall
apply.

11. The Government of the United States of
America and the Government of Israel agree to
consult on any question arising in the implementa-
tion of the agreement.



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN



;



12. Mutually satisfactory administrative arrange-
.ents or adjustments may be made to resolve minor

oblems arising in the implementation of this
ment including differences in points of pro-
idures or operation.

13. If the Government of Israel considers that as
result of limitations specified in this agreement,

irael is being placed in an inequitable position vis-
■vis a third country, the Government of Israel may
jquest consultation with the Government of the

' nited States of America with the view to taking

■' ppropriate remedial action such as reasonable

'■ edification of this agreement.

" 14. During the t«rm of this agreement, the Gov-
rnment of the United States of America will not
jquest restraint on the export of cotton textiles
rom Israel to the United States under the provi-
ions of Article 3 of the Long Term Arrangements,
he applicability of the Long Tei-m Arrangements
) trade in cotton textiles between Israel and the
Tnited States shall otherwise be unaffected by this
jreement.

15. In view of the special circumstances that ex-
ited in 1966 the following special provisions apply:

(a) For the first agreement year only, exports
1 Categories 9/10, 22/23 and 26/27 up to 60 per-
jnt in excess of the specific limit for each such set
f these categories and the sublimit in duck:

(i) shall not be counted against the specific limits
pecified in paragraph 4 or the Group II limit speci-
ed in paragraph 3, but

(ii) shall be counted against the aggregate limit
pecified in paragraph 2.

'he figures stated in paragraphs 3 and 4 for group
nd specific limits shall be used without any adjust-
lents authorized under paragraph 5 for the pur-
ose of calculating the amount of these exports that
re not to be counted against specific and g^oup
mits.

(b) During each of the second, third and fourth
greement years, the two Governments will charge
gainst the specific, group and aggregate limits ap-
licable for each such year the following quantities
s compensation for overshipments during the 12-
lonth period beginning October 1, 1965:



ill

jl 'ategory

itl

pi 3



:2

6

duck)
2

TOTAL



2nd Srd Uh

Agreement Year Agreement Year Agreement Year

( In Square Yards Equivalent )

780,000
(169,565 lbs)
160,000
240,000



780,000
(169,565 lbs)
160,000
240,000

50,000



780,000
(169,565 lbs)
160,000
240,000

50,000



1,230,000



1,230,000



50,000
1,230,000



The figures in this paragraph (15b) shall, at the
request of the Government of the United States of
America, be adjusted by amendment of this agree-
ment if the December, 1966 statistics of the Gov-
ernment of the United States of America indicate
that these figures would not provide appropriate
compensation for these overshipments.

16. Either Government may terminate this agree-
ment, effective at the end of an agreement year, by
written notice to the other Government to be given
at least 90 days prior to the end of such agreement
year. Either Government may at any time propose
revisions in the terms of the agreement.

If these proposals are acceptable to your Gov-
ernment, this note and your Excellency's note of
acceptance on behalf of the Government of Israel '
shall constitute an agreement between our Govern-
ments.

Accept, Excellency, the renewed assurances of my
highest consideration.

For the Secretary of State:
Anthony M. Solomon

His Excellency

AVRAHAM HAKMAN

Ainbassador of Israel

ANNEX A

Cotton Textile Catexjories
Factors



AND Conversion









C(mver8ion








Factor








(Square


Category Description


Unit


Yards)


1


Yarn, carded, singles


Lb,


4.6


2


Yarn, carded, plied


Lb.


4.6


3


Yarn, combed, singles


Lb.


4.6


4


Yam, combed, plied


Lb.


4.6


5


Gingham, carded


Syd.


1.0


6


Gingham, combed


Syd.


1.0


7


Velveteen


Syd.


1.0


8


Corduroy


Syd.


1.0


9


Sheeting, carded


Syd.


1.0


10


Sheeting, combed


Syd.


1.0


11


Lawn, carded


Syd.


1.0


12


Lawn, combed


Syd.


1.0


13


Voile, carded


Syd.


1.0


14


Voile, combed


Syd.


1.0


15


Poplin and broadcloth,
carded


Syd.


1.0


16


Poplin and broadcloth,
combed


Syd.


1.0


17


Typewriter ribbon cloth


Syd.


1.0


18


Print cloth, shirting type,
80 X 80 type, carded


Syd,


1.0



' Not printed here.



S MARCH 6, 1967



391



Category



Description



19



20

21

22
23
24

25

26

27

28
29
30
31
32

33

34
35
36
37

38

39
40
41

42
43



44
45

46

47

48

49
50



Print cloth, shirting type,
other than 80 x 80
type, carded
Shirting, Jacquard or

dobby, carded
Shirting, Jacquard or

dobby, combed
Twill and sateen, carded
Twill and sateen, combed
Woven fabric, n.e.s., yam

dyed, carded
Woven fabric, n.e.s., yam

dyed, combed
Woven fabric, other,

carded
Woven fabric, other,

combed
Pillowcases, carded
Pillowcases, combed
Dish towels
Other towels
Handkerchiefs, whether

or not in the piece
Table damask and

manufactures
Sheets, carded
Sheets, combed
Bedspreads and quilts
Braided and woven

elastics
Fishing nets and fish

netting
Gloves and mittens
Hose and half hose
T-shirts, all white, knit,

men's and boys'
T-shirts, other, knit
Shirts, knit, other than

T-shirts and sweat-
shirts
Sweaters and cardigans
Shirts, dress, not knit,

men's and boys'
Shirts, sport, not knit,

men's and boys'
Shirts, work, not knit,

men's and boys'
Raincoats, % length or

longer, not knit
Other coats, not knit
Trousers, slacks and

shorts (outer) , not

knit, men's and boys'



Conversion
Factor
(Square
Unit Yards)



Syd.

Syd.

Syd.

Syd.
Syd.
Syd.

Syd.

Syd.

Syd.

No.
No.
No.
No.
Doz.

Lb.

No.
No.
No.
Lb.

Lb.

Doz. Prs.
Doz. Prs.
Doz.

Doz.
Doz.

Doz.
Doz.

Doz.

Doz.

Doz.

Doz.
Doz.



1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0
1.0
1.0

1.0

1.0

1.0

1.084

1.084

.348

.348

1.66

3,17

6.2
6.2
6.9
4.6

4.6

3.527

4.6

7.234

7.234
7.234

36.8
22.186

24.457

22.186

50.0

32.5
17.797



Category



51



Description



Unit



Trousers, slacks and
shorts (outer) , not
knit, women's, girls'
and infants'

Blouses, not knit

Dresses (including uni-
forms) , not knit

Playsuits, washsuits,
sunsuits, creepers,
rompers, etc., not
knit, n.e.s.

Dressing gowns, includ-
ing bathrobes, beach
robes, lounge robes,
housecoats and dust-
ers, not knit

Undershirts, knit, men's
and boys'

Briefs and undershorts,
men's and boys'

Drawers, shorts and
briefs, knit, n.e.s.

All other underwear,
not knit

Pajamas and other
nightwear

Brassieres and other
body-supporting
garments

Wearing apparel, knit,
n.e.s.

Wearing apparel, not
knit, n.e.s.

All other cotton textiles
Apparel items exported in
under separate categories of



52
53

54



55



56



57



58



59



60



61



62



63



64



Doz.



Doz.
Doz.

Doz.



Doz.



Conversion
Factor
(Square
Yards)

17.797



14.53
45.3

25.0



61.0



\



«



Doz.


9.2


Doz.


11.25


Doz.


5.0


Doz.


16.0


Doz.


51.96


Doz.


4.75


Lb.


4.6


Lb.


4.6



Lb. 4.6

sets shall be recorded
the component items.



Current Actions



MULTILATERAL



Antarctica



Measures relating to the furtherance of the principles
and objectives of the Antarctic treaty. Adopted at
Santiago November 18, 1966, at the Fourth Con-,
sultative Meeting. Enters into force when approved
by all the Contracting Parties entitled to partici-
pate in meeting held to consider measures.



392



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN



>ad Lines

ternational convention on load lines, 1966. Done at
London April 5, 1966.*

Acceptance deposited: Malagasy Republic, January
16, 1967.

aritime Matters

mvention on facilitation of international maritime
traffic, with annex. Done at London April 9, 1965.'
Accessions deposited: Iceland and Nigeria, Janu-
ary 24, 1967.

ugar

otocol for the further prolongation of the Interna-
tional Sugar Agreement of 1958 (TIAS 4389).
I Done at London November 14, 1966. Open for sig-
nature at London November 14 to December 30,
1966, inclusive. Entered into force January 1,
1967."
Accession deposited: Guyana, January 1, 1967.

Mecommunications

itemational telecommunication convention with an-
nexes. Done at Montreux November 12, 1965.
Entered into force January 1, 1967."
Ratifications deposited: Congo (Brazzaville), De-
cember 21, 1966; Netherlands (including Sur-
inam and Netherlands Antilles), December 27,
1966; Switzerland, January 5, 1967; United
Kingdom (including Channel Islands and Isle of
Man), January 4, 1967.

rheat

rotocol for the further extension of the Interna-
tional Wheat Agreement, 1962 (TIAS 5115). Open
for signature at Washington April 4 through 29,
1966. Entered into force July 16, 1966, for part I
and parts III to VII ; August 1, 1966, for part II.
Approval deposited : United Arab Republic, Febru-
ary 15, 1967.



BILATERAL



razil

Lgreement relating to the disposition of equipment
and materiel furnished under the military assist-
ance agreement of March 15, 1952 (TIAS 2776).
Effected by exchange of notes at Rio de Janeiro
January 27, 1967. Entered into force January 27,
1967.

lominica

Agreement relating to the establishment of a Peace
Corps program in Dominica. Effected by exchange
of notes at Bridgetown and Dominica December
16, 1966, and January 11, 1967. Entered into force
January 11, 1967.

Malta

Lgreement relating to investment guaranties. Signed
at Washington November 16, 1966.
Entered into force: January 26, 1967.



' Not in force.

* Not in force for the United States.



Morocco

Cultural agreement. Signed at Washington February
10, 1967. Entered into force February 10, 1967.

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

Agreement for extending the validity of the agree-
inent of February 5, 1965, relating to fishing for
king crab, with exchange of notes. Signed at
Washington February 13, 1967. Entered into force
February 13, 1967.

Agreement on certain fishery problems in the north-
eastern part of the Pacific Ocean off the coast of
the United States of America, with exchange of
notes. Signed at Washington February 13, 1967.
Entered into force February 13, 1967.



PUBLICATIONS



Recent Releases

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Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C.,
201t02. Address requests direct to the Superintend-
ent of Documents except in the case of free publi-
cations, which may be obtained from the Office of
Media Services, Department of State, Washington,
D.C., 20520.

Viet-Nam in Brief. Pamphlet briefly summarizing
the basic facts about the war in Viet-Nam. Emphasis
is on our role in South Viet-Nam, our efforts to
achieve a peaceful settlement, and progress toward
economic and political objectives. Pub. 8173. Far
Eastern Series 153. 21 pp. 15«*.

Some Causes of Organizational Ineffectiveness With-
in the Department of State. Center for International
Systems Research (CISR) Occasional Papers Num-
ber 2. Dr. Chris Argyris, Yale University professor
of organizational behavior and noted author, sum-
marizes some of the major findings from three 1965
Airlie House management conferences attended by
senior Foreign Service officers. Using excerpts from
the conference tapes. Dr. Argyris analyzes the most
significant management problems developed by the
FSO's during the sessions. Some conclusions are
critical of certain "norms of the living system" of
the Foreign Service which the author states are also
characteristic of other large organizations. But the
author stresses that this "analysis focuses on the
State Department as a social system and not upon
the Foreign Service officers as individuals." Pub.
8180. 52 pp. 2h



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