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including scientific institutes.

b. The Parties will provide for exchanges between
United States and Romanian universities of profes-
sors and instructors for lectures, Romanian and
English language instruction and study, consulta-
tions and seminars.

2. Scientific, Technical and Industrial Exchanges

a. The Parties will encourage the development of
exchanges in the field of science, including such
exchanges as may be carried out between the acad-
emies of sciences of both countries.

To this end, each Party will facilitate visits of
scientists from the other country for the purpose
of delivering lectures and addresses at scientific in-
stitutes and institutions of higher learning, and for
specialization.

b. The Parties will encourage the exchange of
group visits of specialists and technicians to study
various aspects of technical and industrial activity
in the other country.

c. Through diplomatic channels or appropriate au-
thorized organizations, and on a mutual basis, the
Parties will continue to invite scientists and tech-
nicians to participate in national scientific meetings,
congresses and conferences with international par-
ticipation.

3. Exchanges in Performing and Creative Arts

a. The Parties will encourage and facilitate ex-
changes in the field of performing arts, including
artistic, musical and theatrical groups and individ-
ual artists.

The Parties will facilitate the attendance of in-
vitees at national musical competitions and other
similar events with international participation which
may be organized in each country.

b. The Parties will encourage and facilitate ex-
changes in the field of creative arts, including writ-
ers, journalists who are specialists in cultural prob-
lems, composers, artists, and others.

4. Exchanges in Sports

Each Party will encourage and facilitate invita-
tions from its appropriate organizations to athletes



' Not printed here.

' For background, see Bulletin of Dec. 26, 1960,
p. 969; Apr. 29, 1963, p. 661; and Jan. 18, 1965,
p. 87.



MARCH 20, 1967



479



of the other country to participate in sports and
athletic events in its own country.

5. Exchanges of Books and Publications and Cooper-
ation in the Field of Publishing

a. The Parties will encourage and facilitate ex-
changes of books, pamphlets, periodical literature,
scholarly and scientific studies, microfilms and other
printed and duplicated materials devoted to educa-
tional, scientific, technical, cultural and other sub-
jects between university, public and specialized
libraries and other appropriate institutions of both
countries.

Educational materials and publications may
include university catalogues, textbooks, study pro-
grrams, curricula, syllabi, visual aids and docu-
mentary materials in various fields of study.

b. The Parties will use their good oflfices to en-
courage the sale through commercial channels of
books and other publications in the Romanian
language in the United States and in the English
language in the Socialist Republic of Romania.

c. The Parties will encourage, subject to the
consent of the authors or other parties in interest,
the translation and publication in one country of
scientific and literary works, including anthologies,
dictionaries and other compilations, as well as sci-
entific studies, reports and articles published in the
other country.

6. Radio and Television Exchanges

a. The Parties will facilitate the exchange of
radio and television companies and organizations.

The details of these exchanges will be worked
out between the representatives of American radio
and television companies designated by the Depart-
ment of State and Romanian radio and television
organizations designated by the Romanian author-
ities, or between the Parties,

b. Each Party will facilitate appearances, either
recorded or in person, over radio and television by
government officials, artists and public figures of
the other country.

c. The Parties will encourage radio and television
broadcasts devoted to the national holidays of the
two countries (July 4 for the United States of
America and August 23 for the Socialist Republic
of Romania).

7. Exhibits

The Parties will provide for showings in several
cities of exhibits from the other country during
each of the two years these arrangements are in
effect.

8. Cooperation in the Field of Motion Pictures
a. The Parties will encourage the conclusion of

commercial contracts between American film com-
panies designated by the Department of State and
Romanian film organizations designated by the
Romanian authorities for the purchase and sale
of mutually acceptable feature films.



480



b. The Parties will encourage the exchange of ap-
proved documentary and scientific films between
corresponding organizations and assist their distri-
bution through appropriate distribution channels.

c. The Parties will seek to arrange annual gala
performances in their respective capitals and othei:||
cities of representative films to which film personal-
ities from the other country may be invited.

d. The Parties agree that all of the films ex-
changed, purchased, or sold in accordance with this
section will be released in dubbed or subtitled ver-
sions. The contents of the films will be preserved
and any changes must be agreed to by the supply-
ing Party. Prior to its distribution, the release ver-
sion of each film must be agreed to by a representa-
tive designated by the supplying Party.

e. Both Parties will facilitate and encourage joint
production of art and documentary films, as well as
cooperation in the field of motion pictures through
other means that may be agreed upon between the
two Parties.

9. Tourism

The Parties will facilitate the development of tour-
ism between the two countries and agree to take
measures, on the basis of equality of opportunity,
to satisfy the requests of tourists to acquaint them-
selves with the way of life, work and culture of the
respective peoples.

Specific details and programs of the above-men-
tioned visits and exchanges will be agreed upon
through diplomatic channels or between authorized
organizations.

The Parties agree that visitors will pay their own
round-trip transportation from capital to capital.
Whenever mutually advantageous the Parties will
seek to arrange for the payment by the receiving
side of the local expenses of the visitors.

The arrangements agreed upon do not exclude the
possibility of additional visits and exchanges which
may be mutually acceptable to the Parties and which
may be undertaken by interested United States and
Romanian organizations or private citizens, it being
understood that arrangements for additional ex-
changes, as appropriate, will be facilitated by prior
agreement in diplomatic channels or between author-
ized organizations.

It is understood that the arrangements provided
for above shall be subject to the constitutional re-
quirements and applicable laws and regulations of
the two countries.

The Government of the United States of America
takes note of the approval by the Government of
the Socialist Republic of Romania of these under-
standings as confirmed in your Note of today's date.'

Accept, Excellency, the renewed assurances of my
highest consideration.

Richard H. Davis



' Not printed here.



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN



.



furrent Actions



MULTILATERAL

viation

onveiition on the international recognition of
rights in aircraft. Opened for signature at Geneva
June 19, 1948. Entered into force September 17,
1953. TIAS 2847.
Ratification deposited: Iceland, February 6, 1967.

onvention on oifenses and certain other acts com-
mitted on board aircraft. Done at Tokyo Sep-
tember 14, 1963.'

Ratifications deposited: Denmark, Norway, and
Sweden, January 17, 1967.

'Opyright

rotocol 1 annexed to the Universal Copyright Con-
vention concerning the application of that con-
vention to the works of stateless persons and
refugees. Done at Geneva September 6, 1952.
Entered into force September 16, 1955. TIAS
3324.
Ratification deposited: Italy, December 19, 1966.

customs

ustoms convention on the temporary importation
of professional equipment. Done at Brussels June
8, 1961. Entered into force July 1, 1962.^
Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.
;ustoms convention on the ATA camet for the
temporary admission of goods. Done at Brussels
December 6, 1961. Entered into force July 30,
1963.=
Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.
lustoms convention regarding ECS camets for
commercial samples. Done at Brussels March 1,
1956. Entered into force October 3, 1957.=^
Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.
Customs convention on the international transport
of goods under cover of TIR carnets with modi-
fications of annexes. Done at Geneva January 15,
1959. Entered into force January 7, 1960.^
Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.
lustoms convention on containers. Done at Geneva
May 18, 1956. Entered into force August 4, igsg.''
Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.



;;onvention on the settlement of investment disputes
between states and nationals of other states. Done
at Washington March 18, 1965. Entered into force
October 14, 1966. TIAS 6090.
Signature : Burundi, February 17, 1967.
Ratification: Korea, February 21, 1967.

fisheries

International convention for the conservation of
Atlantic tunas. Done at Rio de Janeiro May 14,
1966."

Senate advice and consent to ratification: March
1, 1967.

Maritime Matters

Inter-American convention on facilitation of inter-
national waterborne transportation. Signed at
Mar del Plata Jure 7, 1963.'



Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.
Convention on facilitation of international maritime
traffic, with annex. Done at London April 9, 1965.
Entered into force March 5, 1967.=^
Senate advice and consent to ratification: March

1, 1967.

Nuclear Test Ban

Treaty banning nuclear weapon tests in the atmos-
phere, in outer space and under water. Done at
Moscow August 5, 1963. Entered into force Octo-
ber 10, 1963. TIAS 5433.
Ratification deposited: Nigeria, February 28, 1967.

Publications

Convention concerning the international exchange
of publications. Adopted at Paris December 3,
1958. Entered into force November 23, 1961.*
Acceptance deposited: Indonesia, January 10,
1967.

Convention concerning the exchange of official pub-
lications and government documents between
states. Adopted at Paris December 3, 1958.
Entered into force May 30, 1961."
Acceptance deposited: Indonesia, January 10, 1967.

Safety at Sea

International convention for the safety of life at
sea, 1960. Done at London June 17, 1960. Entered
into force May 26, 1965. TIAS 5780.
Acceptance deposited: Ireland, February 14, 1967.

Sea

Convention for the International Council for the
Exploration of the Sea. Done at Copenhagen
September 12, 1964.'

Senate advice and consent to ratification: March
1, 1967.

Space

Treaty on principles governing the activities of
states in the exploration and use of outer space,
including the moon and other celestial bodies.
Opened for signature at Washington, London, and
Moscow January 27, 1967.'
Signatures: India, March 3, 1967; Iraq, February

27, 1967; South Africa, March 1, 1967; Upper

Volta, March 3, 1967.

Sugar

Protocol for the further prolongation of the Inter-
national Sugar Agreement of 1958 (TIAS 4389).
Done at London November 14, 1966. Open for
signature at London November 14 to December
30, 1966, inclusive. Entered into force January
1, 1967."

Ratification deposited: Peru, January 30, 1967.
Accessions deposited: Bolivia, January 9, 1967;

Congo (Brazzaville), January 1, 1967.
Notifications of intention to seek ratification,

acceptance, approval, or accession deposited:

Hungary, India, Mexico.

Telecommunications

Partial revision of the radio regulations, 1959 (TIAS
4893, 5603), to put into effect a revised fre-
quency allotment plan for the aeronautical mobile
(R) service and related information, vdth an-
nexes. Done at Geneva April 29, 1966. Enters into
force July 1, 1967, except the frequency allot-



' Not in force.

" Not in force for the United States.



MARCH 20, 1967



481



ment plan contained in Appendix 27, which enters
into force April 10, 1970.



Trade

General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade with an-
nexes and schedules and protocol of provisional
application. Concluded at Geneva October 30,
1947. TIAS 1700.

Admitted as contracting party (with rights and
obligations dating from independence) : Bar-
bados, February 15, 1967.



BILATERAL



Canada

Agreement regarding radio communications between
Alaska and British Colombia. Effected by ex-
changes of notes at Washington June 9, July 11
and 18, August 22, September 27, October 4,
November 16, and December 20, 1938. Entered
into force August 1, 1938. 53 Stat. 2092.
Notification of termination: United States, Feb-
ruary 28, 1967.

Canadian note of April 5, 1966, and proposed
United States reply concerning amendment of
the convention on Great Lakes Fisheries (TIAS
3326).'

Senate advice and consent to ratification: March
1, 1967.

' Not in force.



Til



Romania

Arrangement relating to a program of exchanges
in cultural, educational, scientific and other fields
for the calendar years 1967 and 1968. Effected
by exchange of notes at Bucharest February 18,
1967. Entered into force February 18, 1967.

s

i



DEPARTMENT AND FOREIGN SERVICE



Confirmations

The Senate on February 28 confirmed the follow-
ing nominations:

William S. Gaud to be U.S. Alternate Governor
of the Inter-American Development Bank for a
term of 5 years and until his successor has been
appointed.

William B. Macomber, Jr., to be an Assistant
Secretary of State. (For biographic details, see De-
partment of State press release 47 dated March 7.)



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN VOL. LVI, NO. 1447 PUBLICATION 8216 MARCH 20, 1967



The Department of State Bulletin, a
weekly publication issued by the Office of
Media Services, Bureau of Public Affairs,
provides tbe public and interested agencies
of the Government with information on
developments in the field of foreign rela-
tions and on the work of the Department
of State and the Foreign Service. The
Bulletin includes selected press releases on
foreign policy, issued by the White House
and the Department, and statements and
addresses made by the President and by
the Secretary of State and other officers of



the Department, as well as special articles
on various phases of international affairs
and the functions of the Department. In-
formation is included concerning treaties
and international agreements to which the
United States is or may become a party
and treaties of general international inter-
est.

Publications of the Department, United
Nations documents, and legislative material
in the field of international relations are
listed currently. '

The Bulletin is for sale by the Super-



intendent of Documents, U.S. Government
Printing Office, Washington. D.C., 20402.
Price: 52 issues, domestic $10, foreign $15;
single copy 30 cents.

Use of funds for printing of this publi-
cation approved by the Director of the
Bureau of the Budget (January 11. 1966).

Note: Contents of this publication are
not copyrighted and items contained herein
may be reprinted. Citation of the Depart-
ment of State Bulletin as the source will
be appreciated. The Bulletin is indexed in
the Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature.



482



DEPARTMENT OF STATE BULLETIN



INDEX March 20, 1967 Vol. LVI, No. 1U7



Atomic Energy

[^resident Johnson Renews Call for Nonprolif-
eration Treaty (message to 18-Nation Dis-
armament Committee) 447

Secretary McNamara Comments on Risks of
Anti-Ballistic-Missile System (transcript of
BBC interview) 442

U.S., U.S.S.R. To Exchange Views on Limiting
Nuclear Arms Race (Johnson) 445

Congress

Confirmations (Gaud, Macomber) 482

Kennedy Round Enters Decisive Phase (Roth) . 476
Mrs. Neuberger Appointed to ACDA Advisory

Committee 448

Department and Foreign Service. Confirmations

(Gaud, Macomber) 482

Disarmament

Mrs. Neuberger Appointed to ACDA Advisory
Committee 448

[President Johnson Renews Call for Nonprolif-
eration Treaty (message to 18-Nation Dis-
armament Committee) 447

I U.S., U.S.S.R. To Exchange Views on Limiting
Nuclear Arms Race (Johnson) 445

Economic Affairs

Economic Situation in Viet-Nam (Johnson,

Komer, Lilienthal) 467

Kennedy Round Enters Decisive Phase (Roth) . 476

Educational and Cultural Affairs. U.S., Romania
Complete 1967-68 Cultural Exchange Ar-
rangement (text of U.S. note) 479

International Organizations and Conferences

Foreign Ministers of the American Republics
Meet at Buenos Aires (Bunker, conference
documents) 472

Gaud confirmed as U.S Alternate Governor of
Inter-American Development Bank .... 482

President Johnson Renews Call for Nonprolif-
eration Treaty (message to 18-Nation Dis-
armament Committee) 447

Latin America

Foreign Ministers of the American Republics
Meet at Buenos Aires (Bunker, conference
documents) 472

Gaud confirmed as U.S. Alternate Governor of
Inter-American Development Bank .... 482

Secretary Rusk and Secretary McNamara Dis-
cuss Developments in Latin America and
Viet-Nam (transcript of press conference) . 464

Military Affairs. Secretary McNamara Com-
ments on Risks of Anti-Ballistic-Missile Sys-
tem (transcript of BBC interview) .... 442

Presidential Documents

Economic Situation in Viet-Nam 467

President Johnson Renews Call for NonprolLf-
eration Treaty 447

U.S., U.S.S.R. To Exchange Views on Limit-
ing Nuclear Arms Race 445

Romania. U.S., Romania Complete 1967-68 Cul-
tural Exchange Arrangement (text of U.S.
note) 479

Southern Rhodesia. Southern Rhodesia: The
Issue of Majority Rule (Palmer) 449

Trade. Kennedy Round Enters Decisive Phase
(Roth) 476

Treaty Information

Current Actions 481



U.S., Romania Complete 1967-68 Cultural Ex-
change Arrangement (text of US. note) . . 479

Trinidad and Tobago. Secretary Rusk and Sec-
retary McNamara Discuss Developments in
Latin America and Viet-Nam (transcript of
press conference) 464

U.S.S.R.

Secretary McNamara Comments on Risks of
Anti-Ballistic-Missile System (transcript of
BBC interview) 442

The U.N.: An Arena for Peaceful East-West
Engagement (Sisco) 458

U.S., U.S.S.R. To Exchange Views on Limiting
Nuclear Arms Race (Johnson) 445

United Nations

Southern Rhodesia: The Issue of Majority Rule

(Palmer) 449

The U.N.: An Arena for Peaceful East- West

Engagement (Sisco) 458

Viet-Nam

Economic Situation in Viet-Nam (Johnson,
Komer, Lilienthal) 467

Secretary Rusk and Secretary McNamara Dis-
cuss Developments in Latin America and
Viet-Nam (transcript of press conference) . 464

Name Index

Bunker, Ellsworth 472

Gaud, William S 482

Johnson, President 445, 447, 467

Komer, Robert W 467

Lilienthal, David E 467

Macomber, William B., Jr 482

McNamara, Robert S 442, 464

Neuberger, Maurine B 448

Palmer, Joseph 2d 449

Roth, William M 476

Rusk, Secretary 464

Sisco, Joseph J 468



Check List of Department of State
Press Releases: Feb. 27-IVIar. 5

Press releases may be obtained from the
Office of News, Department of State, Wash-
ington, D.C., 20520.

Releases issued prior to February 27 which
appear in this issue of the Bulletin are Nos.
31 of February 10, 37 of February 18, and
41 of February 23.

No. Date Subject

*42 3/2 Henning sworn in as Ambas-
sador to New Zealand (bio-



graphic details)
oToi



t43 3/2 Solomon: "Why the United
States Should Expand Peace-
Trade With Eastern Europe."
44 2/28 Palmer: California Institute of
Technology, Pasadena, Calif.

* Not printed.

t Held for a later issue of the Bulletin.



ir U.S. Governinent Printing Office: 1967—251-933/37



SUPERINTENDENT OF DOCUMENTS

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE

WASHINGTON, D.C., 20402



POSTAai AND PCS* PAID
U.S. eOVIRNMKNT PRINTINO OPP



OFFICIAL BUSINESS



Viet-Nam Information Notes

The first three pamphlets of a new series of background papers on various aspects of
Viet-Nam conflict have been published by the Department of State. Basic Data on South Vi
Nam (publication 8195) summarizes the history, geography, government, and economy of t
country. The Search for Peace in Viet-Nam (publication 8196) reviews peace efforts by t
United States and the United Nations and other diplomatic initiatives. Communist-Directed Fort
in South Viet-Nam (publication 8197) reviews the growth of Viet Minh and Viet Cong fon^
Communist objectives, strengths, and weaknesses.



B CENTS EA(






ORDER FORM



To: Snpt. of

QoTt. Printing O0n
WwUnston, B.C. 20402



PUBLICATIONS 8195, 8196, 8197 6 CENTS EACH



Enclosed find $ (cash, check, or money order). Please send copies of

Viet-Nam Information Notes as indicated: Basic Data on South Viet-Na/m

(8195) ; The Sea/rch for Peace in Viet-Nam (8196) ; Com-
munist-Directed Forces in South Viet-NoM, (8197).



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THE OFFICIAL WEEKLY RECORD OF UNITED STATES FOREIGN POLICY



THE

DEPARTMENT

OF

STATE

BULLETIN



Vol. LVI, No. 1U8




March 27, 1967



FROM THE IRON CURTAIN TO THE OPEN DOOR
Address by Vice President Humphrey 486

AMBASSADOR GOLDBERG REPORTS ON HIS TRIP TO ASIA
Transcripts of Netvs Conferences 505



THE GREAT TRANSITION: TASKS OF THE FIRST

AND SECOND POSTWAR GENERATIONS

Lecture at the University of Leeds

by W. W. Rostow, Special Assistant to the President A91



For index see inside back cover



From the Iron Curtain to the Open Door



Address by Vice President Humphrey '



Exactly 21 years ago today, Winston
Churchill spoke these well-remembered
words: "From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste
in the Adriatic, an Iron Curtain has de-
scended across the Continent."

"The Continent," of course, was Europe.

When Churchill spoke here, a new phase
in history had begun: that postwar conflict,
centered in Europe, which was to become
known as the cold war.

It is my belief that we stand today upon
the threshold of a new era in our relations
with the peoples of Europe — a period of new
engagement. And I believe that this new
period, if we do not lose our wits or our nerve
or our patience, can see the replacement of
the Iron Curtain by the Open Door.

When Churchill spoke here on March 5,
1946, there were many in this country — and
elsewhere — who would not accept his stark
characterization of the state of affairs in
Europe.

But Churchill was right. And he was right
to speak out. The beginning of wisdom, the
foundation of sound policy and action, is to
face the facts.

What were the facts in March of 1946 ?

Western Europe lay helpless and prostrate
after a terrible war, literally dependent for
her survival on the protection and good will
of the United States. The political institu-
tions, the economies, the peoples, of Westera



' Made at Westminster College, Fulton, Mo., on
Mar. 5.



Europe stood helpless — save for the United
States — in face of the imperialist impulses
emanating from the East.

There, Stalin had literally erected an Iron
Curtain between the nations and peoples of
Eastern Europe and those of the West. On
his side of that curtain he saw all as occu-
pied territory — the spoils of war. And his
further intentions were declared and clear.

What are the facts of March of 1967?

Western Europe stands today second only
to the United States as a free and powerful
center of economic and social well-being.
Because of their brave initiatives — and with
our help — the nations of Western Europe
stand able once again to assert their own
role in the world.

In Eastern Europe the captive states of 21
years ago are once again reaching toward
their own identities. The monolithic control
which smothered and held them in the grip
of terror is today diminishing.

The Iron Curtain itself — although firm
and impenetrable in many places, as in Ber-
lin — has become increasingly permeable in
others. Goods, ideas, and people have begun
to crisscross the European Continent.



Online LibraryUnited States. Dept. of State. Office of Public CoDepartment of State bulletin (Volume v. 56, Jan- Mar 1967) → online text (page 82 of 90)