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The opium farmer pays into the royal treasury, for his monopoly, S384,000
per annum. The gambling farmer pays $292,800. The spuits farmer pajs
8110,400.

Opium only is recognised by treaty as a monopoly ; but the Siamese author-
ities have been for some time past trying to ma&e the spirit farm a monopoly,
about the same as opium. Considerable correspondence, collective and individ-
ual, has passed between the consuls and the minister of foreign affaiza during



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BARBAB7 STATES.



55r



the year on the subject. The Siamese antboritiefl are willing to allow foreigners
free tmde in liquors among themselves, bat protest against their selling it to
Siamese subjects.

The import duty on spirits or liquors has not been collected for some tim.e.
A majority of the consuls appear to be willing to allow the Siamese authorities
or spirits farmer to require a license of the foreign merchants or dealers to en-
able them to sell to Siamese subjects.

Spirits have become a very extensive article of import. Several of the trea-
ties are very specific in declaring that no other tax or duty other than the three
per cent, import duty shall be levied on foreign* imports.

February 15, 1863.

• * * Exportations decreased considerably last year consequent upon the
large rice crop in China and India. The following table shows tne exports for
1861 and 1862 by vessels of various nations :



1861.


1862.


Nationality.


Tonnage.


Nationality.


Tonnage.


American


28,372
36,422
5,501
7,612
4,539
3,247


AnriericAn ...................


23,573
28,7:30
10,261


British -


i^itiflh


Hambnrff


Hamburg.


HAl)4^ri<^ °


Holland


10,967
3,980
1,700


Danish ......................


Danish


French ......................


French ......................




Total !•...




Total


85,693
79,211


79,211






Tons in favor of 1861


6,482





Principal exports last year (1862) were rice, 1,555,664 piculs;* sugar,
102,516 picnls; sapanwood, 74,776 piculs; pepper, 24,820 piculsj hides*
15,352 piculs; teak, 7,000 tons.



BARBART STATES.

Tbipoli — ^William Portbr, ComuL

March 31, 1863.

I have the honor to enclose herewith full returns of the trade and commerce
of this port for the year 1862.

Everything as to the affairs of this regency goes on smoothly» with brilKont
prospects for very abundant crops.

-r - .1

* A picol eqoalB 133^ pounds srolrdupow. '^



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558



ANNUAL BEPOBT ON FOREIGH COIOIEBCE.



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3



.aebiomj : . 569

March 31, 1863.
I hare the honor to zepcvt to yon that no mf^hant vesflel of the United
Statea has visited this port dming the quarter ended on this day, and that no
feee hav0 beeti recaved in this consnlate within the same quarter.



APEICA.

MoNRoviA^A. Hanson, Commercial Agent.

JuNB 10, 1863.
I have the honor to enclose, herein duplicate copies of the "Liberia Herald,"
and bc^ leave to call your attention to ^* An'act confining and restricting foreign
vessels to ports of etitry from and after the first day of January, A. D. 1865.'*

AN ACT ooafiiming and restricting foreign Teasels to ports of entiy.

It ii enacted hjf the senate and house qfrepreeentativee oftht republic of Liberia
in leguiature aseembled: • ^

Bbc. 1. That from and afber the first dav of Jantmi^, A. D. 1865, (eighteen
btmdred and sixty-five,) no foreign vessel or vessels arriving on the coast of
liberia from any port or place, or Liberian vessels engaged in the fbreign trade,
sliall be allowed to trade at any point or parts, but at ports of entry that are
now or may hereafter be created by the l^slature of this republic.

Sbc. 2. It is ftirther enacted, that from and after the first day of January,
1865, (eighteen hundred and sixty-five,) aU foreign vessels are by this act pro-
hibited from landing or delivering any goods, wares, or merchandise, of whatsoever
kind, at any point or part of the coast of the republic of Liberia, except at such
points or parts of the coast of this repubHe as are now or may be declared by
the legislature of the republic of Liberia to be ports of entry and delivery.

Sbc. 3. It is further enacted, that any foreign vessel or vessels violating any
of the provisions of this act shall be seized by any revenue or naval officer of
this republic, and brought to the nearest port of entry and delivery, (as in the
opinion of the revenue or commanding naval officer may deem expedient,) and
ddivered into the custody of the national officer of the admiralty court of the
cotxnty into which said vessel or vessels shall be brought; and upon adjudication
and conviction before said court, the mastexLof said vessel shall be fined in a sum
of not less than five thousand nor more than ten thoosand dollars.

A|>proved Februaiy 4, 1863.



Gaboon Bivbs— Hbney May, Consul,

JuNB 16, 1863.
1 wonld beg. leave to state that the trade between the United States and this
port is vary limited. During the past year there have been but three American
Teasels in this river. These belonged to a single firm in the city of l^ew York.
No consular books have been kept in this placed but, according to my best in«
fbnoiation^ Uiei'e' have not been more than tliree American vessels here durine^^
siny one year for the past three years. I know oiTno American vessel expected
here at present

' The trade of this rii^er iir principally in the hilnd^ of the English. The ex*

ports from this port durine the past year were : ivory, 25 tons ; bar-wood, 2,000

tons; mbber, 12S tons; arao small quantities of beeswax, gum-copal, and ebony.

The American trade at this port ftince my arrival {November 3, 1862) has

not exceeded $1,200. ' ' ; " i .



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560 ANNUAL BEFORT ON FOREIGN COMMERCE.

Sbptbmbbr, 30, 1863.

I have the honor to transmit the following information ;
^ The trade of this river is free to all vessels -of every country. No tonnage
duties or other port dues are imposed. No vessel, however, is allowed to pro-
ceed more than fifteen miles up the river without a special permit from the
authorities. This permit has not been granted to any vessel since my arrival.
The captain of every vessel must deposit his ship's papers with the commandant
of the guard-ship immediately upon his arrival, and report himself to the com-
mandant on shore, presenting a manifest of the ship's cai-go and passenger list.
No passenger Is permitted to land without license. The captain must give
twenty-four hours' notice in order to obtain his discharge and receive his papers.

The trade upon this part of the African coast is increasing. The amount of
rubber shipped from the Gaboon, Mooncy, and Moondah rivers for the present
year greatly exceeds that of any former year. This rubber mostly goes to
England, costing here about six (G) cents per pound.

The amount of ivory exported from this place and vicinity is about the same
as it was twenty years ago, but the price is much higher. Ivoiy costs here
from fifty to one hundred and fifty cents per pound, according to the quality;
most of this production goes through England to the continent. The amount
of bar- wood is equal to the demand, though it is becoming scarce upon the
banks of the river, the principal supply being procured some distance up
and in the interior; most of this eventually reaches France, though a
great proportion is shipped in English vessels. Bar- wood costs here about four
dollars and fifty cents per ton.

It is exceedingly difficult to obtain any reliable information in regard to the
resources of the interior; jealousy which exists among the different tribes being
an obstacle. From th« best information which I can gather, I judge that the
rubber trade has reached its maximum, from the fact that the natives, in order
to secure the milk from which it is made, destroy the vine.

The French are extending their possessions on this coast, having recently
porchased the river and country of Bonny, paying a large sum to the native
Ling, Pepell. They have taken possession of the Congo, at least the north
bank of it, and also of Cape Lopez. The latter is a few miles to the ^outh of
this river. They have, too, the rivers Mooney and Moondah, which are situated
about fifty miles to the north of this place, emptying th*eir waters into the
Corisco bay.

I have no arrivals or departures of American vessels to report during the
last six months. «



CHINA.

SwATow — 0. W. Bradley, Vice-Coimtl,

JuNB 30, 1863.

• • • I have also enclosed herein particulars of commerce by
Ameriean vessds entered and cleared at this port during the past three months, as
made up from consular and cvstom returns — amount of imports being $163,639,
and of exports, $175,645 each. The cargoes inward from the north consist
chiefly of bean-cakes manufactured from peas at the most northern ports, and
are used here as manure on the sugar plantations to m very iMge extent, move
80 than at any of the other sugar ports in China.

The quantity imported last year amounts to 470,513 piculs, being an increase
of 49,539 piculs over that of the year 1861. The quantity of this year's impsil^
tation is also large, say for the past six months, being 371,959 piculs.

The value of the import of bean-cake, in 1862, was about $833,^97. The

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CHINA.



561



gugar exported from this port goes chiefly to the north of China, a few cargoes
finding their way to England, San Francisco and Australia. During the years
of 1861 and 1862 the crops of cane were poor, and a considerable falling off in
exports has been noticed. It is estimated that from this district, on an average,
some 600,000 or 700,000 piculs are reported yearly, and worth, on an average, $5
per picul. The quantity exported in 1862 was 453,978 piculs ; thus showing
that for these two items of commerce a good many foreign vessels are employed
on the coast. For a more full detailed list of the articles of commerce imported
and exported, I beg to call your attention to the comparative table of the import
and export trade at this port for 1861 and 1862, which has been furnished me
by the commissioner of customs of Swatow, and herein enclosed.

Comparative statement of the import and export trade of the port of Smatow
during the yean 1861 and 1862.



Imports.



1861.



1862.



Decrease
inl86S.



Increase
in 186^



Shirting, gray pieces.

Shirting, white do . . .

T. dot&, 24 yards do...

LiseDs, flpray do. . -

Cotton, dyed do...

Cotton, fancy do...

Damask do...

Drills, American do. . .

Handkerchie& dozens.

Blankets pairs.

Camlets, English pieces.

Camlets, Datch do...

Flannels do. . .

LastiDgs .' do. . .

Long ells do. . .

Spaniflh stripes do: . .

Metals, iron nail rods piculs.

Metals, lead do...

Metals, 4in do...

Cotton, foreign do. . ,

Cotton, yam do. . .

Opiam, Malwa chests.

Opium, Patna do...

Bean cake piculs.

Beans and peas do. . .

Biche do mar do. . ,

Cotton, Shanghai do. . .

Hemp do...

Mangrove bark do. . .

Manure cakes do. . .

Kankins do. . .

Oil do...

Pepper, black do...

Kattans do...

Bice do...

Sandal wood do. . .

Sapan vrood do. . .

Sharks' fins - do . . .

Silk piece goods -do. . .

Vermicelli do...

Bstimatod value of articles above enu-
merated

Bstimated value of articles not enu-
merated in the above list



Total value of import trade. . . . .
H. Ex. Doc. 41 86



56,486

10,291

32,505

400

6,590

2,229

657

6,941



4;i9
20



555'

1,673

734

6,213

, 1,204

2,319

24,418

7,618

1,932

777i

420,774^

96,383

478

21,347

421

744

5,670

1,420

1,062

1,544

1,549

51,961



8,231
52
58

2,374



41,895

15,105

31,595

159

7,958

1,688

1,015

2,488

1,752

15

1,391

16

4

1.272

2,969

1,281

6,104

795

1.997

4,906

5,310

l,978i

1,251*

470,513

93,431

349

54,979

686

60

2,867

951

577

1,494

1,301

23,159

285

4,523

50

137

4,262



4,556,535
103,794



5,055,371
143,704



4,659,329



5,199,075



14,591


iieii'


910
241






1,368


541


463


4,453




1.752




15




952


4




4




716




1,296




547


109





409

322

19,512

2,308



2,952
129



46*
474i
49,739



13,632
265



684

2,803

469

475

50

243

28,802



285

1,297



79
1,883



533,746

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562 ANNUAL REPORT ON FOREIGN COMMERCE.

Comparative statement — Continued.



Exports.



Betel leavefl : piculs.

Capoor cntchery do. . .

Chinaware, coarae f . . . do. . .

Earthenware do. . .

Grass cloths do...

Hemp thread do. . .

Leather do. . .

Paper do. . .

Potato flour do. . .

Shoes pairs.

Sugar, brown piculs.

Su^ar, white do. . .

Tobacco do. . .

Tobacco, leaf do...

Vegetables do . . .



Estimated Talue of articles above enu-
merated

Est! mated value of articles not enumerated
in the above



Total value of export trade.



1861.



1662.



Decrease.



Increase.



454

975

11,608

373

6d9

:I21

520

:^,418

9,745

25,740

262,314

204,772

6,649

1,286

5,430



2,093,185
121,470



754

1,169

22,725

1,064

455

494

456

43,980

20,427

50,139

247,465

206,513

7,482

373

11,610



3,026,691
183,577



^,214,655



3,210,268



234



.100

194

11,117

691



173



64



14,849



40,562
10,683
24,399



913



1,741
833



6,160



995,613



Shipping.


1861.


1862. Decrease in
, 1862.


Increase in

ises.


Vessels.


Tons.


Vessels.


Tons, Tons.


Tons.


Inward, with cjurgoes

Inward, in ballast


193

28

155

61


75,585

9,614

61,605

21,547


214

37

175

70


83,138
11,776
66,477
26,261




7,5.'>3




2,1®

4,872
4,714


Outward, with cargoes

Outward, in ballast















Summaiy.


1861.


«


1862.


Decrease in
1862.


Increase in
1862.


Value of import trade


$4,609,329
2,214,655


$5,199,075
3,210,268




$589,746
995,613


Value of export trade








Total


6 823 984 8 ^^7 ^^




1,585,357











Shanghai — Geo. Fred'k Seward, Connd.

December 1, 1S62.

I have the honor to forward you, under this cover, a copy of a code of regu-
lations for United States vessels trading in the Yangtsze river, just published by
me, by order of his excellency the minister.

It has hitherto been considered an undecided point whether vessels were at
liberty to trade at all places on the Yangtsze as far as Hankow, or only at the
three ports mentioned in the British treaty. The Chinese have held that the
trade was lunitcd ; the merchants, on the other hand, that their vessels were free
to trade as they chose.



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CHINA. 563

The latter view has at no time received the distinct sanction of the British
minister, although supported by the British consuls at this and the river ports,
as well as by the consuls of the United States and other nations.

* * These are, indeed, the first full regulations ever promulgated by
ns ; they are definite on the point mentioned, and, as they will be followed by
similar r^;ulations on the part of England, become conclusive.

How important they are you will be able to judge when I state that the
amount of property in steam vessels held by Americans, and finding employ-
ment upon the river, is not less than a million and a half of dollars, and that our
interests are but a moiety of the whole.

They are of especial importance to Americans, as, owing to the superiority of
our river vessels, we share in the commerce of the Yangtsze in a much lai^er
proportion than that of our general interests in China.

Consulate of the United States,
Shanghai, C7iina, November 25, 1862.
The undersigned is directed by Anson Burlingame, envoy extraordinary
and minister plenipotentiary of the United States to China, to give notice that
the fuilowing revised regulations opening custom-houses at Hankow and Kiu-
kiang, and under which trade is to be carried on, have been communicated to
him by the Chinese government, and that they will come into operation on the
first of January next, at which time they will supersede the provisional regula-
tions of the fifth of December, 1861.
By order,

GEO. FEED'K SEWARD, Consul.

HBVISBD REGULATIONS OF TRADE ON THE YANGTSZB-KIANO.

Article I. United States vessels are authorized to trade on the Yangtsze-
kiang at three ports only, viz : Chin-kiang, Kiu-kiang and Hankow. Ship-
ment or discharge of cargo at any other port on the river is prohibited, and vio-
lation of the prohibition renders ship and cargo liable to confiscation.

Native produce, when exported from any of these thi$e ports, or foreign im-
ports not covered by exemption certificate, or native produce that has not paid
coast trade duty, shall, when imported into any of these three ports, pay duty
as at the treaty ports.

Article II. United States merchant vessels trading on the river are to be
divided into two classes, namely :

First class. Sea-going vesseU, that is, merchantmen trading for the voyage up
the river above Chin-kiang, lorchas, and sailing vessels generally.

Second class. Steamers running regularly between Shanghai and the river
ports.

These two classes of vessels will be dealt with according to treaty, or the
rules affecting the river ports to which they may be trading.

All vessels, to whichever of the two classes they may belong, if about to pro-
ceed up the river, must first report to the customs the arms or other munitions
of war they may have on board, and the numbers and quantities of these will
be entered by the customs on the vessel's river pass. Permission to trade on
the river will be withdrawn from any vessel detected carrying arms or muni-
tions of war in excess of those reported to the customs, and any vessel dretected
trading in arms or munitions of war will be liable to confiscation.

Any vessel falling in with a revenue cruiser of the Chinese government will,
if examination of them be required, produce her papers for inspection.

Article III. Sea-going vessels. United States merchantmen, lorchas, and
sailing vessels generally, if trading at Chin-kiang, will pay their duties and
tonnage dues at Chin-kiang.



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664 ANNUAL REPOET ON FOREIGN COM^ERCK.

If a veBBel of this class is proceeding further than Ghiu^kiang, that w, either
to Kiu-kiang or to Hankow, her master must deposit her papers with the cohbuI
at Chin-kiang, and must hand iii her manifest to he examined hj tlie Chlu-kiang
customs ; the superintendent of which, on receipt of an official application from
the consul, will issue a certificate, to be called the Chin-kiang pa^s, to the ves-
eel. The Chin-kiang pass will have entered upon it the number and qnantities
vi arms, muskets, guns, swords, powder, &c., on board the vessel ; also the
number of her crew, her tonnage, and the flag she sails under.

The customs will be at liberty to seal her hatches, and to put a customs em-
ploy6 on board her. On her arrival at Kiu-kiang, whether going up or coming
down, her master must present her pass to the customs for inspection.

The duties on cargo landed or shipped at Kiu-kiang or Hankow roust all be
paid in the manner prescribed by the regulations of whichever of the two ports
she may be trading at, and on her return to Chin-kiang she must surrender her
Chin-kiang pass to the customs at Chin-kiang ; and the customs having ascer-
tained that her duties and dues have been all naid, and that every other condi-
tion is satisfied, the grand chop will be issuea to the vessel, to enable her to
obtain her papers and proceed to sea.

The customs will be at liberty to put an employ^ on board the veesel to ac-
company her as far as Lang-shan.

Any United States vessel of this class found above Chin-kiang without a
Chin-kiang pass will be confiscated. Any junk without Chinese papers viU
similarly be confiscated.

Articlb IV. River steamen. — Any United States steamer trading regularly
on the river will deposit her papers at the United States consulate, ut Shanghai,
and the customs, on application of the United States consul, will issue a special
river pass, (or steamer's pass,) that shall be valid for the term of six months.
Steamers trading on the river under this pass will be enabled to load and dis-
charge» and will pay duties according to the rule affecting river steamers.

On arriving ofi' Chin-kiang or Kiu-kiang, the steamer, whetlier proceeding up
the river or down, will exhibit her pass to the customs.

The tonnage dues leviable on any steamer holding a river pass shall bo paid
alternately at Chin-kiang, Kiu-kiang, and Hankow.

The customs are at liberty to put a lidewaiter on board a steamer at any of
these ports, to accompany her up or do^irn the stream, as the case may be.

Infringement of river port regulations will be punished by the infliction of the
penalties in force at the ports open by treaty ; for a second offence thi* steamer's^
river pass will also be cancelled, and she will be refused permission to tra^c
thencefor.ward above Chin-kiang.

Any steamer not provided with a river pass, if her master propose proceeding
above Chin-kiang, will come under the rules affecting sea- going vessels laid down
in Article III, and will be treated accordingly.

Article V. River steamers' cargoes, — First. Where native produce is
shipped at a river port on board a steamer provided with a river pass, the
shipper must pay both export and coast trade duty before he ships it. If it
be for export to a foreign port, this should bo stated when the produce arrives
at Shanghai; and if it be exported from Shanghai within the three months
allowed, the shipper will obtain fi-om the Shanghai customs a certificate of its
re-exportation, on production of which at the river port of shipment, whether
Chin-kiang, Kiu-kiang, or Hankow, the customs of that port will iss^uc a draw-
back- for the amount of coast trade duty paid.

Second. Where import cargo is transhipped on board a river steamer at
Shanghai, it must first be cleared of all duties. The transhipment wnll not be
authorized until the customs are satisfied that the import duties have been paid.

Articlr VI. Native craft, owned or chartered by United States merchants,
will pay duty on their cargo at the rates leviablenon such cargo under the treaty



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CHINA. 565

tariff. All such craft will further have to be eecared by bond in the manner
laid dowa in the provisional mlcs published on the 5th of December, 1861, and
on entry into^any port will pay port duea according to Chinese tariff. If the
cargoes of native craft bo employed do not agree with their cargo certificate, the
amount specified in their bonds will be forfeited to the Chinese government.
This provision is only valid until tranquillity is restored along tiie river.

Article VII. United States vessels of all classes, as well as junks owned
or chartered by United States merchants, must apply to the customs at the port
of departure for a cargo certificate, (tsungtauy) which, on the vessel or junk's
arrival at the port of destination, must be handed in to the customs before per-
mission to discharge Ciin be given.

The above regulations are provisional, and open to revision, if necessary.

FOBRUARV 21, 1863.

Referring to the revised river regulations, a copy of which is enclosed, I have
the honor to point out to jou the urgent and existing demand for a consul at
Chin-kiang. ^

By the regulations duties are collectable at Chin-kiang, Kiu-kiang, and Hankow.
Ohin-kiang is situated on the banks of the Yangtsze, above the arm of the sea,
which forms its debouchure. Kiu-kiang and Hankow are further up, and re-
spectively about 350 and 450 miles from Chin-kiang. The commerce of the
river is confined to the upper ports, and Chin-kiang has as yet no importance
beyond that derived from its character as a barrier.



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