United States. Industrial Commission.

Preliminary report on trusts and industrial combinations, together with testimony, review of evidence, charts showing effects on prices, and topical digest online

. (page 157 of 237)
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along about $3, $3.25, $3. .50, and $3.75. Lots of these contracts we are still work-
iUfi on.

Q. If I understand you, the regular prices quoted in the markets and the trade
papers did not represent tbe exact condition of affairs with tbe mills?— A. Not what
they were getting for plate.

Q. Will you pel hajis explain a little further what the course of the market has
been from the time the Tin Plate Company was formed to date — that is, the selling
price? — A. It has been upward.

Q. Could you give us the figures? — A. That started, I think, at $3.

Q. Y'ou sa'id tbe prices were about $2.60?— A. We sold some for .$2.75 after the
company was organized. Then at $3, $3.25, $3.35, $3,874, $4.25, and the present
price is $4.65.

Q. When these prices were put up'from $3.87-J- to $4.25, was tliat one immediate
change made at ouoe ? — A. That was at the time of the advance of steel from $22
to $37 or $38 a ton .

Q. As soon as the price in steel was advanced, you advanced the price? — A. Pig
tin and steel went up very rapidly in 30 or 40 days.

THE BOX OF TIN PLATE.

Q. When you are speaking of these prices, what are they — the price per box? —
A. Yes. 14 by 20— 100-pouud plates, f. o. b. the mills.

Q, Can you tell us how much steel and how much tin there is in a box of this
finished product?— A. In a full weight box there are 105^ pounds of steel and 2^
pounds of tin, making 108 pounds. , ^ .

Q. .^o that you make tbe prices on 105* pounds of steel and 2i pounds of tin, and
figuring out I'he cost of that will give substantially the cost of the raw material?—

Q. Subtract the cost of the raw material from the cost of the full weight box, and
you will find the cost of production, plus your profit, the profit of tlie seller or uianu-
facturerl— A. There is something to be figured besides, lu roiling steel there is
some scrap. Tbere is an allowance for that, to be made.

() That could be counted in the cost of production ?— A. Y'es.

o' Is that an a,bsolute waste?— A. Oh, no; but there is perhaps 20 per cent waste
in rolling $38 steel, and the scrap would sell for $11 or $15, perhaps; I do not know
the exact scrap market. ^ , ^ • x, i .

Q. So, liguring out the prices in this way to determine the general range of
profits, there is this waste? — A. Yes.



868



HEARINGS BEFORE THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.



Q. Could you furnish the commission with the course of prices, monthly prices,
of tinished product, of steel billets and of tiu, for a period running from 1888 to
date? — A. I can get them for you.

Q. Will you be kind enough to furnish them to nsf — A. Yes.'

Table 1. — Average price, by months, of billets and slabs sold by Bellaire Steel Company.

[Prices furnished by Mr, Keirt. ]



Month.



1888. I 1889.



January

ITebruary

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

November

December

Whole year.



$30.31
28.74
28.49
28.40
28.14
28.08
28.00
27.43
27.93
28.36
27.48
27.55



28.24



$27. 65
28.18
27.32
27.89
26.41

25. 95
26.16
26.32

26. 27
26.57
26.88
27.92



26.95



$32. 01
32.36
33.10
31.01
30.04
28.84
26.00
30.36
30.00
29.68
28.95
28.10



$27. 61
26.00
25.95
25.42
20. 11



25.47
25.75
25.71
25. 56
25. 24
1 24.49



30.04 1 25.75



1892.



524. 50
24.62
24.03
24.04
23.43
22.94
20.66
23.53
23. 73
23.70
23. 67
23.43



23.62



$22. 71
22.32
22.70
22.63
22.22
22.27
21.80
21.13
20.00
19.47
19. 39
18.65



$18. 66
17.59
16.68
16.20
16.00
16.91
16.84
15,93
16.98
15.89
16.60
15.61)



21.26 16.49



$14. 86
14.85
14.88
14.76
15.02
15.62
17.18
18.24
18. 73
20.24
20.05
19.73



17.01



189(



^21. 19
19.19
17.62
17.65
19.08
20.11
19.00



20.17
19.45
19.23
16.90



19.06



1897.



$15. 14
16.41
15.61
15.61
15.66
15.46



14.71
16.07
14.61
13.82



1898.



$13.93
14.02
14.00
14.04
14.16
15.08
14.84
14.78
14.74
14.91
15.10
14.75



15. 09 14. 66 20. 73



$15. 53
14.98
14.62
16.24
15.27
15,09
17.18
26.49
26.86
33.37
32.39



Month.



Table 2. — Average selling price of pig tin in New York.
[Prices furnished by Phelps, Dodge & Co., at request of Mr. Eeld.]



1888.


1889.


1890.


1891.


1892,


1893.


$37. 00


$21. 80


$20. 80


$20. 60


$19, 80


$20. 60


37.00


2L40


20.60


20.00


19,80


20.60


37. 00


21.00


20.40


20.00


19,80


21.00


31.00


20.80


20.00


20.00


20,20


21.00


19.20


20. 50


20.60


20,20


21,00


20.20


17.80


20.10


21.40


20.60


22,20


19.60


19.00


19.80


21. 00


20.40


21,90


18.60


20.70


20.10


22.00


20.00


21,40


19.00


22.50


20.20


22.80


20.00


20,60


19.80


22.60


20.60


22.40


20.00


21.40


20. 60


22.60


21.50


21.80


19,80


21.00


20.60


22.00


21.60


20.60


19.80


20.60


20.40



1894. 1895,



1896,


1897,


1898,


$13. 20


$13, 20


$13.80


13,20


13,40


14.00


13.40


13, 20


14.20


13,40


13,20


14.40


13,40


13,20


14.70


13,40


13,60


16.00


13,40


13,80


16,40


13,20


13,80


15,80


13,00


13,60


16,20


12.80


13,60


17,00


13,00


13,60


18,00


13,00


13,60


18,60



1899.



January

February

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

^November . ...
December



^20, 00
19,40
19,00
19,40
19,80
19.60
19.00
18.20
17.00
16.40
14,40
13,80



$13, 60
13,60
13,80
14,00
14.40
14.20
14.20
14.40
14.60
14.70
14.60
13.80



$22. 00
23.00
23.60
25,00
25,40
25,60
28,50
31,00
31,60
31,20
28.00



Table 3. — Average price of American Bessemer voice tin plates, 14 by SO, full weigM, 108
pounds, delivered in New York.

[Prices furnished by Phelps, Dodge & Co,, at request of Mr, Keid,]



January . .
February .

March

April

May

June

July

August . , ,
September
October . . .
November,
December .




1897,


1898.


$3.40


$3. 15


3.30


3.15


3.35


3.16


3.40


3.10


3,40


3,10


3.35


3,10


3.30


3,05


3.20


3,00


8.15


3,00


3.15


2.90


3. 15


2.95


3.16


3.10



$3.34
3.84
4. 21J
4.2li
4.21i
4. 214
4.71i
5.00
6.00
6.00
5.00
5.00



' Mr, Reid gives the following estimate of the labor cost of tin plate, in a letter dated December 16,
1899: "In regard to the average amount of wages paid per box of tin, based on 14 by 20 size, I bog to
say that the tigure.^ that I give you herewith are the only ones obtainable at the present time and are
from one of the largest works now in the consolidated company. They date back since 1893. At that
time the mill was a small one and the cost per box would show higher than when the mill was larger
and had a greater output. The average price of labor per box in the year 1893 was $1.60. This was
during the time of small output. In 1894, after the works bad been increased somewhat, it was $1.33.
During the years 1896, 1897, and 1898, up to the time of consolidation, the average price about was $1.
This was when the mill had been increased to its present capacity and was getting its maximum
output. Please remember these figures were made during the old scale of wages and before the
present scale became ojjerative."



THE TIN-PLATE COMBraATION: REID.



869



Table 4. — Averatje price of imported coke tin plates, 14 hy r30, full weight, 108 pound
delivered at Xeiv York, duty paid.

[Prices furnished by Plielx)s, Dodge & Co., at request of Mr. lieid.J



Month.



January ..
February .

March

April

May

June

July

August. ..
September
October. ..
November
December



$4.75 ^


4.79


4.74


4.69k


4.53


4.40


4.51


4.58


4.62


4.47


4. 29.',


4.24



4. 47J

4.44

4.37i

4.3o|

4.41J

4.48

4.731

5. 15J

5.40 ■

5.40

5.10),



1891.


1892.


$5.32


$4.85


5.42


4.85


5.30


4.85


5.20


4.85


5.25i


4.85


5.39


4.85


5.37


4.821


5.46),


4.80


5. 3(i


4.80


5.31


4.85


5.28i


5.00


5.28


5.00




ip4. 22
4.40
4.34
4.34
4.57
4.76
5.05
5. .58
5.40
.5.31
5.31
5.34



Until July 1, 1891, the duty was 1 cent per pound.
July 1, 1891, to August 28, 1894, tlie duty was 2^^ cents per pound.
August 2X. 1894, to July 24, 1897, the duty was li cents per pound.
Since July 24, 1897, the duty was IJ cents per pound.

WAGES — PAY ROLL — AMALGAMATED ASSOCIATION SCALE.

Q. Will you tell us what the course of wages has been to one or two different
classes of workingmen in this industry from 2 years before the Tin Plate Company
was organized up to date, the same as you did about prices? — A. The wage scale has
been advanced since the new company came into existence; the ordinary common
labor around the mill about 20 per cent, and skilled labor 1.") per cent: but in adjust-
ing scales between different mills there has been an advance greater than 15 or 20
per cent on common labor. The advance in the entire pay roll of the company
would amount, I should say, to about $2,000,000.'

Q. Annuallyf — A. Annual pay roll.

Q. What has been the increase in the number of men? — A. I should say we have
on 2,000 more mill men than we had.

Q. When you were organized? — A. When the new company was organized; yes.

Q'. (liy Mr. Kennedy.') How many more? — A. 2,000; close to it.

Q. Have you an agreement with the Amalgamated Association of Iron, Steel, and
Tin ^^'orkers in your combination ? — A. We have an agreement to pay them a scale
of wages, beginning July 1, to the following Jul.y 1.

Q. Is that a sliding scale? — A. It is a scale like this: For every increase in the
price per box of 10 cents, I think it is, after it reaches a. certain price, the increase
in labor runs 4 cents a box.

Q. Are you paying them now on the basis of these contracts that you are filling
of old organizations that came into your combination?— A. We are paying the new
scale on every box rolled in the mill, regardless of the prices the goods are sold at.

Q. So they are not to get an increase when you have finished the old contracts? —
A. Thev are now getting the increase.

Q. (By Jlr. Jk.nks.) When did that begin?— A. The 1st of July.

Q. (By Mr. Farqoiiar.) Does that scale stand for 12 months? — A. It stands for 12
months.

THE SLIDING SCALE SLIDES UP, NOT D0« N.

Q. At the very high piice you are selling tin at, are the wages of mechanics com-
mensurate with the prices you are getting from the consumer?— A. They are the
best paid men in the country.

Q. Are they sharers?— A. They are getting their full share. In fact, if there was
any little change in raw material to bring about a higher cost the only way I see to
meet it is to get- it off the laboring man. If there was a further increase in the cost
of pio- tin and steel to the figure that we hear talked of as the probable price next
year,%he only way the Tin Plate Company could run except at a loss would be to
cut the workman.

Q. (By Mr. Jbnks.) Cut wages below what they are now?— A. Cut wages below
what they are now.

Q. (By Mr. Kennedy.) Could you not increase the cost of the product to the con-
sumer? — A. We could some; yes.

Q. Would not that be as easy a way as reducing the wages of the men ?— A. A $10
advance on steel would mean a good deal.



I See Mr. Graham, p. 853 ; Mr. Griffiths, p. 903.



870



HEARINGS BEFORE THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.



Q. Could you not share it between the cousumeT and the workingman hiHtead of
taking it all off the workingmair? — A. "We ave tied up with the workingman until
next year; we would have to pay them these wages; we could not change; that is
what I was trying to illustrate.

Q. (Jiy Mr. FarquhaI!.) So you have a rigid scale for 12 mouths? — A. For 12
months; yes.

Q. (Jiy Mr. Jenks.) If I nnderstaud your contract, if you put up the price of the
product, the wages of labor are increased proportionately. Suppose trade conditions
are such that the price of the product falls below what it was when the contract was
made ; does your agreement with the workiugmen provide for lowering the wages pro-
portionately ? — A. That stand.s ; their wages are fixed for a year. If there is a further
increase in price above the price at the time the scale was made, I believe it was
$1.2.5, then they slide up.

Q. (By Mr. Farquhar.) First of all, there is a minimum scale agreed upon; if the
prices rise there is an arrangement that they are to share four-tenths of that rise? —
A. That is it exactly.

Q. (By Mr. Jenks.) Can you not furnish us with a copy of that scale? — A. Yes.

Western scale of prioes ijoeiriiin;i wages in rollinij mills for the ijear ending June 30, 1900,
published by National Lodge, Amalgamated Association of Iron, fileel, and Tin Worlers.

TIX-PLATE SCALE.

When a box of 100 pounds coke tin plates is selling at $4.25 the scale of prices as
appears below shall be paid. On each 10 cents increase in the price per box 2 per
cent advance on the prices below shall be paid, and on each 10 cents per box decrease
a deduction of 2 per ceut shall be made to said basf, but it is understood that the
wage list below is the minimum for the year ending .June 30, 1900.



Gauge.



Nos. 8to 11 ....
Nos. 12 anil 1.3 .
Nos. 14 and 15 .
Kos. 16 aud 17 .
Nos. 18 to 20...
Nos. 21 to 24 . . .
Nos. 25 and 26 .
Nos. 27 aud 28 .
No.s. 29 and 30 .

No. 31

No. 32

No. 33

No. 34

No. 35

No. 86

No. 37

No. 38

No. 39

No. 40

No. 41

No. 42

No. 43

No. 44



Keller. .Doubling



$2.:



$1.
1.
1.
1.



3


!H


4


01


4


39


4


94


5


18


5


40


5


03





80



nil .iaw or
. crncodile

sliL'iirw and
ijiib or sbeet
j work, per

I tOD.



98
03

2:!

52 jX
70 ';
87 ■(
OG /



$1.26



Shearing
tin plate on

squaring

shears, per

ton.



2.22


1.13


.49


2,68


1.01


.52


2.86


.97


.53


3.01


1.00


.55


3.10


1.03


.59


3.39


1.20


.61


3. 60


1.20


.63


3.74


1.25


.66


3.79


1.21


.08


3. S5


1.17


.70


4.14


1.29




4 83


1.33


. 75


5. 06


1.40


.70


5.29


1.45


.77


6, ,VJ


1.49


.78


5.75


1.55


.79



Screw

boy, per

ton.



$0.40



.45
.46
.47
.49
.52
.54
.56
.59



1. Thirteen per cent lees than above prices for iron, except shearman.

2. Twenty per cent added for changed iron and steel.

3. Seventeen per cent added for pickhi-finished iron and steel, except shearman.

4. For all sheets sheared into circles on tin-plate mills where the loss exceeds 10
per cent _'l) per cent extra shall be paid.

5. All plate and sheets cut down to smaller sizes on tin-plate mills to be paid for
at scale prices.

6. For all sheets rolled on tin-plate mills, 1 I square feet and over, not cut down to
smaller sizes, and for tin plates, worked othi'v than tin-idate style, sheet-mill prices
including hii.nds' prices shall be paid, and when working sheets, tin-plate style, the
additional percentage of entire sheet-mill eost ovrv tin-plate shall be added to all
hands' wages on the n.ill, :ind it is understood when plate worked on a tin-plate mill
and is jjot " llrst" pickled, annealed, cold rolled, and thoroughly treated as plate for



THE TIN-PLATE COMBINATION: REID.



871



timiiiig purposes loefore leaving the mill where it is worked, it shall be paid for at
sheet-mill pri(^e8. ( h'or rules, see Addenda.)

7. Where improved squaring shears are used the company shall pay for opening
packs and grinding the knives, and on jaw and crocodile shears the company to pay
for opening packs, and in mills where plates are cut into smaller sizes thau 14 by 20
additional pay for shearing shall he arranged, shearman to change and set the knives.

8. Catchers on tin-plate mills to receive 23 per cent of roller's statement, the same
to be deducted from the roller's statement and paid by the company.

9. Eight (8) hours shall be a day's work on tin or black plate mills, said mills not
to follow out, except when notice to mill crew is given of a change in time of start-
ing Friday morning to .Saturday tuorning, aud mills are not to operate on Saturday
afternoon or Saturday or Sunday nights.

10. It is agreed that no more than three changes in the classification of sheet and
tin-plate mills can be made during the scale year, aud due notice shall be given before
such changes.

11. The weight of bar to be marked on the bar when brought to the mill, or scaler
for weighing bars be furnished at the option of the company.

12. In each tin mill a blackboard shall be furnished, on which the complete weight
of each turn shall be placed within a reasonable time after being made.

13. All tin and black plate shall be weighed by the company after being sheared
and opened.



The limit of a turn's work of 8 hours shall be as follows :



On gauge. 100 pounds.

Nos. 8 to 1 1 13. 500

Nos.l2to 13 l-:,.500

Nos. 14 to 1.5 11. ijOO

Nos. 16 to 17 10, 500

Nos. 18 to 20 9,500

Xos. 21 to 24 7, 500

No. 25 6,7.50

No. 26 6,350



On gauge.

No. 27

No. 28

No. 29

No. 30

No. 31

No. 32

No. 33

No. 34 and lighter .



) pounds.
6,150
5,650
5, 850
5,750
5,550
5, 350
5, 150
4,950



Where 28 gauge is worked in 6 or 8 sheets to the pack 6,150 pounds shall be the limit.

On sizes 20J- by 56 and larger an excess of 5 per cent on the limit may be made, but
if not made on that turn the per cent can not be made up.

Turns below the limit may be made up during the same week for that week, but
in making up lost weight on any turn the output shall not exceed the limit over 500
pounds, and when the 5 per cent is made for that turn the 500 pounds can not be
made.

Scale of prices for Uorewood stacks.



Coke

B. charcoal . .

Charcoal

Double roUini
Heavy coatin
Old style



inning.


Washing.


Catching.


Cents.


Cents.


Cents.


n


11


Si


12


12


4


12


12


4


14


14


4


12


12


4


15


15


4



Standard.— A bos of 14 by 20 containing 112 sheets = 31,360 square inches, to be the standard.
All boxes M^eighing uver 1*36 pounds to be paid for as overweight.



872



HEARINGS BEFORE THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.



Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel TVorkers — Scale of wages for year end

June 30, 1S99.



Gauges.


EoUing

(2,240
pounds) .


Doubling.


Heating.


Shearing
on ,j aw or
cioeodile

Mheara
(per ton).

I $1. 10

} 1.25

1 1.05

.98

.88

.84

.87

.90

1.04

1.04

1.09

1.05

1.02

1.12

1.16

1.22

1.26

1.30

1.35


Shearing

on

squaring

shears

(per ton).


No8. 8 to 11


$2.04
2.13
2.45
3.24
3.62
4.02
4.28
4.32
4.90
5.00
5.22
5. 54
6.14
6.45
6.87
6.96
7.03
7.40
7.78
7.98
8.18
8.38
8.58


$0.93
.96
1.10
1.46
1.63
1.86
1.97
2.08
2.53
2.66
2.79
2.93
3.12
3.30
3.38
3.42
3.49
3.82
4.30
4.50
4.70
4.90
5.10


$0.85
.90
1.07
1.32
1.48
1.63
1.79
1.93
2.33
2.49
2.62
3.70
2.95
3.13
3.25
3.30
3.35
3.60
4.20
4.40
4.60
4. 8U
5.00




No3 12 and 13






$0.36




Nos. 18 to 20






f .40
I .41


Nos 25 and '^6 .....


Nos. 27 and 28


.43


Nos 29 and 30


.45


No. 31


.46


No. 32


.48


No. 33


.51


No. 34

No. 35

No. 36

No. 37 . . -


.53
.56
.57
.69


No. 38


.61


No. 39


.63


No. 40 -


.65


No. 41

No. 42

No. 43

No. 44


.66
.67
.68
.69



OUTPUT.

' The limit of a turn's work of 8 hours shall be as follows :



On gauge. 100 pounds.

Nos. 8 to 11 13,000

Nos. 12 and 13 12, 000

Nos. 14 and 15 11,000

Nos. 16 and 17 10,000

Nos. 18 to 20 9,000

Nos. 21 to 24 7,000

N-o. 25 6,250

No. 26 5,850



On gauge. 100 pounds

No. Ii7 5, 650

No. 28 5, 150

No. 29.. 5,350

No. 30 5,250

No. 31 5,050

No. 32 4, 850

No. :« 4,650

No. 34 4,450



Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel TVorlers — Scale of wages for year ending

Jane SO, ISOS.



Gauges.



Nos. 8 to 11...
Nos. 12 and 13
Nor. 14 and 15
Nos. 16 and 17
Nos. 18 to 20..
Nos. 21 t.)24..
Nos. 25 and 26
N08. 27 and 28
No.s. 29 and 30

No. 31

No. 32

No. 33

No. 34

No. .35

No. 36

No. 37

No. 38

No. 39

No. 40

No. 41

No. 42

No. 43

No. 44



Ivolling

(2,240 .Douhlinj
pounds).



.04
.13

.45



..-.7

.63

.30

.40

.65

.99 I

. 1)4

.97

.43

'eo

..00
;.40
.60
i. 80
1.00
1.20



.96
1.10
1.46
1.63
1.86
2.07
2.21
2.70
2.84
2.97
3.13
3.33
3.52
3.60
3.65
3.72
4.07
4.22
4.36
4.50
4.65
4.80



Heating.



Shearing | Shearing
ou ,iaw or
crocodile

shears
(per ton).



$0.85

.90 \\

1.U7 jl-

1.32 1 1

1.-18 ,..

1. 63 \\



squaring

shears

(per ton).



1.K8
2.05
2.48
2. 66
2.79
2.88
3.15
3.34
3.46
3.52
3.66
3.80
4.00
4 14
4.30
4.43
4.47



$1.05

.98

.88

.84

.87

.90

1.04

1.04

1.09

1.05

1.02

1.07

1.07

1.06

1.05

1.02

1.02



$0.36



.40
.41
.43
.45
.46
.48
.61
.53
.65
.67
.59
.61
.63
.66
.66
.67



THE TIN-PLATE COMBIXATION: REID.



873



The limit of a turn's work of 8 hours shall be as follows:



On gauge. 100 pounds.

No8. S to 11 13,000

Nos. 12 and 13 12, 000

Nos. 14 and 15 11,000

Nos. 16 and 17 10,000

Nos. 18 to 20 .- 9,000

Nos. 21 to 21 7,000

No. 25 6,250

No. 26 5,850

No.27 5,6.50

No. 28 5,150

No. 29 5,350

No. 30 5,2.50

No. 31 5,050



On gauge. 100 pounda.

No. 32 4,850

No. 33 4, 650

No. 34 4,450

No. 35 4. 300

No. 36 4,150

No. 37 : 4,000

No. 38 3,900

N.I. 39 3,800

No. 40 3,700

No. 41 '. 3,600

No. 42 3,500

No. 43 3,400

No. 44 3,300



Amalgamated Association of Iron and Steel TVorliers-

June 30, 1S97.



-Scale of wages for year ending





Gauges.


Rolling

(2,240

pounds).


Doubling.

$0.93
.96
1.10
1.46
1.63
1.86
2.07
2.21
2.70
2.84
2.97
3.13
3.33
3.52
3.60
3.65
3.72


Heating.


Shearing.


Nos. 8 to 11




.$2.04


$0.85
.90
1.07
1.32
1.48
1.63
1.88
2.05
2.48
2.66
2.79
2.88
3.15
3.34
3.46
3.52
3.53


1


Nos. 12 and 13




2.13


\ $0. 99






... 2 45






3.24




Nos 18 to 20




3 02


\ 1.59






4. 07


J






4.57


} 1.71


Nos 27 and 28




4. 63


Nos. 29 and 30 ...




5.30


1.76


No 31




5.40


1.78


No 32




5.65


1.88


No. 33




1 5.99


1.98


No 34




6. 64


2.20


No. 35




1 6.97


2.20


No 36




7.43


2.46


No 37




7. 62


2.49


No. 38




7.60


2,52







The limit of a turn's work of N hours shall be as follows :



On gauge. 100 pounds.

Nos. 8 to 11 12,000

Nos. 12 to 13 11,000



10, 500

10, 000

9, 000

Nos. 21 to 24 7,000

6,250
5, 850



Nos. 14 to 15 .
Noa. 16 to 17
Nos. 18 to 20.



No. 25.
No. 26.



(in gauge.
X(i. 27...
No. 28...
No.2!l...

No. ;x")...
No. 31...
No. 32...
No. 33...
No. 34...



) pounds.
5, 650
5, 150
5, 350
5, 250
5, 050
4,850
4,650
'4, 450



874



HEARINGS BEFORE THE INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION.



The following advance applies to scale of wages paid by American Tin Plate
Company for years 1898 and 1899 :







1898.






1899.






Hour.


Day.


Week.


Month.


Hour.


Day.


Week.


Month.




Cents.
20"'


1 i


Cents.
27

m

24

12|

16^




























. 1


Carpenters' ln'lpers


15"


























$60 00






$75 00




l'i\




lij


1






12-i






i:j.'.-












$12. 50








$15. 87i








iiil


$1.45















iii












15
lU

V2\


















12J
























1.40






1.54
l.bTJ











1.25


. .1








a75




■ afiSJ






















"Where the rate paid prior to January 1 was $1.50, or less, the new rate is 15 per
cent higher; $1.50 to $2, 12 per cent higher; $2 to $2.50, 10 per cent higher.

In addition to this, some of the employees mentioned are advanced 25 per cent.

In the finishing department, including the tinuers and risers, who do most of the
work in connection wi th the tinning or hnishing of the plate, the advance since January
1 has been from 15 to 50 per cent, dependent upon the wages in existence in the dif-
ferent mills before the consolidation.

PKICBS HAVE NOT RISEN PROPORTIONATELY TO COSTS.

Q. You have spoken of the advance in rawmaterial and wages ; has the price of the
finished product been proportionate? — A. Proportionate to the advance in steel,
\\ ire nails, etc. ?

Q. Proportionate to the advance in steel, tin, and wages; your raw material and
wages? — A. I would say no; our advance has not been so great ]iroportionately.



Online LibraryUnited States. Industrial CommissionPreliminary report on trusts and industrial combinations, together with testimony, review of evidence, charts showing effects on prices, and topical digest → online text (page 157 of 237)