United States. Mississippi River Commission United States. Army. Corps of Engineers.

Annual report of the Chief of Engineers to the Secretary of War for ..., Part 3 online

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in extent, in proper condition.

On Levisa Fork snags, stumps, etc., were removed where they inter-
fered with navigation and rocks blasted out. At Big White House
shoal a wall 1,050 feet long, with a base of 7 feet and varying height,
was built to protect the bank, and two gravel-bars on the west side of
the chute were removed. Atvarious other shoals needed improvements
were made and there still remain other points at which slight improve-
ments will be of material benefit to push-boat navigation. It is esti-
mated that an additional sum of $3,000 will be required in removing
other obstructions that still exist.

Ou Tug Fork the work extended above Louisa about 100 miles to
lloughs, and consisted in the removal of snags, trees, and rocks, besides
improving island chutes and removing or modifying mill-dams. It is
estimated that about $2,500 can be profitably expended during the com-
ing: year in continuing this work.

As there is certain to be trouble each year from snags, fallen and lean-



Digitized by VjOOQIC



1788 REPORT Ot* TttE CHIEF OP EKGIKEERS, tJ. 8. ARMY.

h\g trees, etc., this part of the river improvement can not be regarded as
susceptible of completion, and a small annual appropriation will there-
fore be required. The river takes the place of roads, of which there are
very few ahd these of a poor character, so that the low- water navigation
by means of push-boats is a matter of great importance to the people
on the Forks.

For details concerning the work done attention is invited to the re-
port of Mr. B. F. Thomas, the resident engineer, annexed hereto.

Money statement

July 1,1887, amonnt available $10,888.01

July 1, 1888, amount expended daring fiscal year, exclusive of liabilities
outstanding July 1,1887. 7.425.63

July 1.1888, balance available 3,462.38

Amouut appropriated by act of August 11, 1888 31,500.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1889 34,962.38

i Amonnt (estimated) required for completion of existing project 31, 145. 31

Amountthat can be profitably expended in fiscal yearending June 30,1890 31, 145. 31
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS.

Ttade of Big Sandy River, West Virginia and Kentucky, far fi$odl year 1887-'88.



Articles.



BeaDS pounds..

BersMTux do —

Cattle bead..

OoaLcannel tons..

Kzjcca caaes..

Feathers pounds..

Fnre bass..

G unnns poands..

Hides bales..

llo>r« number..

Horses do —

L'atber pounds..

Lumber:

Poplar reet,B.M.

Walnut do...,

Poultry dozen.

Roots, assorted pounds.

^heep number.

Sorghum pounds.

Spoaes



SUTes

Tan-bark oords.

Ties, railroad number.

Timber, logs :

Ash cubic feet.

Mixed do...

Oak do...

Poplar do...

• Walnut number.

Walnut knots pounds.

Wheat ^ bags.

Wool poumis.

Miscellaneous



Total exports

Add imports, miscellanooiis merchandise tons.

PasMugers per boats



Grand total .



Quantities.



78,454

6,224

472

4,225

6,908

68,002

217

7,590

1,498

1,006

45

62,520

375,000

20.000

3.8^

35,400

783

2,679

261,000.000

375,000.000

1,761

850.000

26,250

200,000

885.000

1,075,000

4,185

21,150

6,622

30.103



14,215



Average
price.



Yalnew



$0.08

.25

28.00

8.(f0

4.50

.44

8.30

1.75

2.20

8.00

80.00

.28

25.00
40.00

8.00
.30

2.5D
16,00
12.00
25.00
14. CO
.40

.12
.10
.124
.15
15.50
.40
2.00
.25



100.00



l2.3Si.6S

1,306.0«
13, 2m Of
12.975.00
396,586.00
26,5a0.8B

1,801.10
13.282.50

3,295.60
12, 84a 01

3,6(>0.00
17,506.01

9,375.01
1,010.00

11,50&00

10.6M.00
1,957.60

42,864.00
3,183.00
9; 375. Oft

24,514.00
14O,0(l6L0e

8,150.00
20. 060. CO
48,125.00
161,250.0^
04,887.50

8.460. «•
13,944.00

7.525.TS

S.81&TI



I



71 8, 310. 7»

l,431.6Oa0O

16,392L00

2,156,20178



Digitized by VjOOQIC



APPENDIX E E — REPORT OF CAPTAIN LOCKWOOD. 1789

report of mr. b. f. thomas, assistant engineer.

United States Engineer Office,

Louisa, Ky.y June 30, 1888.

Captain : The report for the year ending Jaue 30, 1888, iR herewith sabmitted.

The work under my charge is the construction of a lock and dam near Louisa, Ky.,
in the Bifc Sandy River, and the imioval of obstructions to navigation in the same
stream and its two forks, the Levisu and Tug.

Up to the present nothing has been done upon the dam, and its character has not
been fiilly decided upon. ExperimeuU have been made to determine whether a sta-
tionary dam will fill with sand and permanently Injure navigation. These, while not
entirely satisfactory, prove the necessity of some provision for allowing at least a
part of the dam t-o remain open during freshets and permit the sand to go through.

The lock is completed, except the gates and wickets, and rests upon the solid rock,
which was blasted to the proper level. This rock is somewhat fissured and it may be
necessary to concrete the chamber floor of lock after it is in operation. The lock i«
located well in the bank, in order not to restrict the water-way of the river, and this
necessitates the excavation of approaches at each end. During the year just closed
the upper approach excavation was finished and the lower one put well under way.

The material thus taken out, being solid rock, was used for filling the space behind
the land wall of lock and protecting the bank below.

The abutment, which was over half done at the time of my last report, has been
completed. It is built on piles and stands 350 feet from the outside lock-wall. A
large crib has been put in adjoining its lower end and it is proposed still further to
protect it by other cribs reaching down to the solid rock. The embankment behind
the abutment is only about one-third in.

REMOVAL OP obstructions TO NAVIGATION.

Fash-boats, carrying crews of men and supplied with all necessary tools and dyna-
mite, were sent out during the last low-water season to remove snags, falleu and lean-
ing trees, stumps, rocks, etc., from the channel and shores, whore they were likely
to i*.iterfore with navigation.

BIG SANDT RIVER, BBLOW LOUISA.

A party, consisting of an overseer and thirteen men, left here on the 25th of July,
18d7, and returned August 20. They removed the following obstructions :

Trees, averaging 82 feet long 107

Snags, averaging 24 feet long 149

Stamps 200

Solid rock, cubic yards 45

Loose rook, cubic yards 12

The four trees at Blaine Point, which have been in the way for some time, wero
taken out, as also were the snags jnst below Blaine, one of which, a very large one,
was in the middle of the channel and quite dangerous.

At Belcher Bar the channel was about closed up with trees and snags and these
were blasted out. A good many rafts " tore up ^ on this place last spring, but It is
now perfectly safe.

At what is known as West Virginia White's Creek was a very bad piece of river,
l>eing filled with stumps, snags, and trees, blocking navigation at some stages of
water.

The steamer Spurlook sank a barge here last spring, and other craft had serious
difficulty in getting through.

Everything in the natnre of an obstruction has now been removed and this part of
the river is in fine condition.

At Kentucky White's Creek a similar lot. of obstructions had been a terror to rafts-
men for some time, and these were also taken out.

These are the principal points operated upon, although snags, trees, stumps, and
rocks were taken out wherever in the way.

Work is still needed upon this river at various points, notably Rove Creek, Rash
Creek, Gragston, and Savage Brancb, where large rocks should be removed.

It is estimated that about $1,500 would put this part of the river, 26 miles, in a
perfectly safe and good condition. Of course subsequent improvement* would have
to be made, as the backwater from the Ohio causes numberless snags to ** sand up"
and lodge in all that part of the Big Sandy near it.

LEVISA FORK.

Work was begun upon Levisa Fork August 22, 1887, by a force of eighteen men.
Baogeroos snags and trees were removed between Louisa and the railroad bridge ;
&w> at Dock Miller's, LisQari^'s, Fish Trap, Dave Kise's, George's Creek, and be-

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1790 REPOET OP THE CHIEF OP EKGHNEEES, U. S. ABMY.

tween there and RichardsoD ; between Graves's and Bumble Bee Shoals, John Bor-
der's Ripple; between Lost Creek and Chestnut Sboals, and below Jo Davis Bend,
Yanhoose's, Jim JeffH ; below Paint Creek ; Preston's Ripple, Hell's Gate, Ivy Sboa),
Snag Bar, Stone Coal, and Long Sboal.

At Mud Creek a tree 125 feet long and 33 feet in circumference was removed from
the channel, and at Muddy Branch a snag 60 feet long and 16^ feet in circumference
was taken out.

A tree 135 feet long and 19| feet in circumference was removed between LoRt and
Chestnut creeks. Dangerous rocks were blasted out at Graves's Shoal, Bumble Bee,
Border's Ripple, Lost Creek, Chestnut, Jo Davis, Little and Big White House, Van-
boose, Wild Goose, Ward Ripple, Greasy, Buffalo, Jeffie's Ripple, Hell Gate, Preston
Ripple. Moodv George's, Sugar Loaf, Ivy, Grimes's, Stone Coal, and Long Shoal.

On tne bend side of the river, at Lost Creek, a large rock, which has long been the
pause of annoyance to craft of all kinds, was removed. It contained over 100 cubic
yards, and was just in the edge of the chute.

Chestnut Shoal was lowered slightly at head and the chute was w idf)n ed .

At Big White House Shoal a great deal of work was done, sOme of it caused bj
the railroad contractors having blasted large rock into it from their cut upo^i the
bank.

A wall 1,050 feet long was built here, with base of 7 feet, and of varying hoij{bt,
generally low, to protect the bank and keep it from slipping in and obstructing the
chute.

Two gravel-bars were also removed on west side of the chute.

At Yanhoose's Ripple the old wall was built a little higher, and a dam was pat in at
head and on east side, to confine the water to the chute.

The old wall at Greasy was repaired.

Buffalo Shoal, 33^ miles above Louisa, was in a very bad condition, and 17 mea
worked here B^ days, removing rock, widening the chute, and otherwise improvioj;
navigation.

Three days were spent at JeflSe's Ripple at similar work.

At Hell's Gate a wall to confine the wat>er was constructed and a gravel-bar re-
moved in order to straighten the chute. The head of the shoal was somewhat low-
ered.

The walls at Wireman's Shoal were repaired and heightened, as were also those at
Abbot.

At Sugar Loaf the river was obstructed with rock for a mile, and these were all re-
moved.

A^ood and much needed improvement was made at Hawes's Ford, Cl^ miles a1>0Te
Louisa, by clearing the shoal and blasting out the solid rock at its head, thereby low-
ering the chute.

The obstruction at Ivy, consisting of stone and snags, was taken out and the walls
at Grimes's were repaired, and a new one^put in on the west side, and the bar formetl
at the mouth of Still House Branch, just at the head of the shoal, was removed aod
the creek led into the river lower down.

The bad rocks at Stone Coal were removed, and the old walls at Long Shoal, 83.?^
miles above Louisa, were repaired.

All the shoals between Louisa and Piketon, a distance of 86 miles, were thoroughly
cleared of bowlders and large rocks that would interfere with navigation, and all the
snags which would be dangerous to craft were taken out. More work, however, is
needed at Contrary Creek, Peach Orchard, Lost Creek, White House, Wild Goose,
Preston Ripple, Wireman's Shoal, Sugar Loaf, Ivy, and Laynesville.

It is believed that|2,500 to $3,000 could be profitably expended next season below
Piketon, and a like amount above that point.

The river below Piketon is in much better condition than ever before, and the
period of navigation has been greatly increased and its safety assured.

The season*8 work consisted of the removal of 211 trees, averaging 75 feet in length,
356 snags, 322 stumps, 1,744 cubic yards solid rock, and 3,200 cubic yards loose rock.

TUG FORK.

The boats left Louisa on June 4 last, and were out about two and one half months,
working an average of 12 men.

The following summary of work done is given, viz:

Trees removed (average length, 55.3 feet ; average circumference, 9.2 feet) 81

Sna^s removed (average length, l\8 feet ; average circumference, 8 feet) 68

Cubic yards solid rock 1,413

Cubic yards loose rock l,I:JO

The part of the river worked over covers a distance of 100 miles, reaching to head
of "Roughs."



Digitized by VjOOQIC



APPENDIX EE — ^REPORT OP CAPTAIN LOCK WOOD. 1791

The principftl obstructions in the upper portions were islands and mill-rlams. No-
tice bad been j^iyen by Major Post that unless' the mill-dams were so modified as not
to iuterfere with navigation they would be removed by the GU>vemment, and this
order was carried out.

Tlie Bailey Dam, at head of Boughs, was taken out on west side of island where
the natara) channel is. The dam at Ben Creek was partly removed and a new boat
cliate cut through the J. C. Williamson Dam, it not being an obstruction to rafts.

Similar work has been done at the Thacker Dam, and some large trees taken out,
aud also at the Stafford Dam.

Part of an old dam at Lick Branch, 60 miles above Louisa, was removed and a now
cbote made.

Dangerous rocks were removed at Bailey's, Greenbrier, Turkey, lack, and Trent's
la the Boughs. One of these rocks containea 184 cubic yards.

From there down bad rocks were taken out at Williamson's Alum, Sleek Bock,
Prater, Eph Hatfield's, Mate Creek, Jackson Bar, Spring Tail, Long Branch, Wolf,
Cram Dam, and the Falls.

At the latter point, lOi miles above Louisa, there has always been a bad obstruction
known as tho '* Bace Bock," being a high ledge directly in the way of craft at good
stages of wat^. Eight days' wo& were done upon it with a dozen men, and it was
lowered considerably, but it will be necessary to do as much more when we have
moot y. It was 190 by 30 by 11 feet, the latter being its height

Improvements were made at islands by widening and deepening the chutes, clear-
iog otf underbrush, removing rock bars, and confining the water to a single chanuci,
wbieh was straightened where necessary, notably at Bailey's, Greenbrier, SteeFs,
6rai>evine, Spring Tail, and Alley. The latter place, having been worked opon the
previoas season, was found to be in excellent shape for navigation.

The shoals were well cleaned when necessary and all sna^, trees, and stamps,
which were an obstruction were removed, and the river is now m very fair condition,
thoQgh there is yet much work to be done, and an appropriation of $2,500 is needed
next season.

That part of the river used for steam-boat navigation needs but little work, but the
upper part will have to be still further improved before rafts can be run in safety,
aod before push-boat navigation can be carried on successfully ; and as these interests
form a large part of the business of the upper country, and are increasing each year,
it is highly important that the improvements be made at ns early a diUe as possible.

The entire river for 100 miles is now in much better condition than ever before, and
its business has largely increased since navigation has become safer and the period
extended by reason of the work done by the United States.

A trip over the lower 77 miles of the river in a push-boat made last month by the
writer proved the former work to have been well and intelligently executed, aud
that it had withstood both floods and ice remarkab ly well.

In conclusion, I desire to say that I have been ably and faithfully assisted in all my
work by the overseers in charge of parties and boats.

Respectfully submitted.

B. P. Thomas,

Aisiatant Engineer .

Capt D. W. LocKWOOD,

CincinnH, Ohio.



££4.
IMPBOVEMfiNT OF GUYANDOTTE BIVEB, WEST VIBGINIA.

This river was uuder the temporary charge of Lieat Col, W. E. Mer-
rill, Corps of Engineerfi, until April 13, 1888, since which time it has
been under my charge.

The Gnyandotte Biver rises in the southwestern part of West Vir-
ginia, flows in a northwesterly direction, and enters the Ohio 12 miles
above the month of the Big Sandy and 39 miles below the month of tho
Great Kanawha.

At the date of the last annual report for this river, the a[>propriations
for its improvement had been exhausted, so that during tbe past fiscal
year no work of any kind has been done.

As there still exist other obstructions similar to those that have



Digitized by Vj'OOQfe



1792 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OP ENGINEERS, U. 8. ARMT.

already been removed, an estimate of $2,000 for fatore work is respect*
fully submitted.

Money statement,
Amoant appropriated by act of Angost 11,1888 $2,000.09



{Amoant (estimated) reqaired for compIetioQ of existing project 6. 000.00

Amount that can bo profitably expended in fiscal year eadiogJano 30, 1R90 2^U00.0I
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.



Cktrnmercial 9t4itbtic9 of Ouyandolte Bivetf West Virginia^ for fiscal year 1887-'tJa



Articles.



Apples, dried noanda.

Apples, green oarrels.

Beaos bnahels.

Beeswax poandH.

Butter do...

Corn bnshols.

E^fra dosens.

Feathers pounds.



Qaantity.



Furs.



.ba^.



Ginseng pounds.

Hides do...

noncy do...

Leather do ..

Oats bushels.

Peaches, dried pounds.

Potatoes .., bushels.

Boots, assorted pounds.

Rye bushels.

Sheep pelts bales.

Sorsnom barrels.

Tallow pounds.

Tobacco hofTsheads

Wheat bushels .

"Wool pounds.

Poplar logs cubic fe«*t.

Oik lops feetB.M

Walnut lops cubic feiet.

Rawed lumber feetB.M.

Staves number.

Hoop-pol^ do ..

Tan-bark cowls.



Total exports .
Total imports .

Grand total . . .



8.000

2,000

600

2,000

6,000

60.000

40,iK)0

13,000

RO

15,000

6,000

1,000

1,000

6.000

40,000

2.600

20,000

2,600

20

1,000

800

160

20.000

25,000

8,000.000

6,000,000

100.000

15,000.000

8,000,000

600,000

1,000



Average price.



#0.0i per pound

2.00 per barrel

2.00 per bushel ....

.25 per pound

.20- per pound

.50 per bushel ....

.12^ per dozen

.40 per pound

8.00 per bag

1.76 perponnd

.07 perponnd

.20 perponnd

.25 perponnd

.40 per bushel

.06 perponnd

1. 00 per boshel

.80 perponnd

.40 per Doshel

8.00 per bale

16.00 per barrel

.04 perponnd

100. 00 per hogshead .

.76 per bushel ....

.26 perponnd

.18 per cubic foot
10.00 perM feet —

.60 per cubic foot .
16.00 pcrM feet....

26.00 perM

12.00 perM

15.00 peroord



Valos.



hi

i.«i



111






240,4j
75.11

1*



rn^t



E E5.

IMPROVEMENT OF LITTLE KANAWHA RIVER, WEST VIRGINIA.

This river was uuder the temporary charfife of Lieut. Col. W.
Merrill, Corps of Engineers, until April 13, 1888, since which dmiel
has been uuder my charge.

The Little Kanawha drains the central portion of West Virginia,]
iug in Upshur County, and flowing thence in a course a little norA^
west until it empties into the Ohio at Parkersbnrgh ; its total lengtki
about 150 miles.

The present project for the improvement of the river, adopted in I
and modified in 1880, contemplates the construction of a lock and 4
to extend slack water navigation for a draught of 4 feet a distaoM i
miles, and the improvement of the natural channel of the upper



Digitized by VjOOQIC



APPENDIX EE REPORT OP CAPTAIN EOCKWOOD. 1793



by the removal of obstrnctioDS for a distance of 80 miles, the object of
the latter being to obtain a channel of a miniinum width of 40 feet,
containing at least 2 feet of water daring four months of the year.

At the close of the fiscal year work on the construction of the lock
had been suspended, and quarrying stone needed to complete the lock
commenced.

During the first fiscal year 1,035 cubic yards of dimension and back-
ing stone were quaried and transported to the lock-site, and 459.77 cubic
yi^s of cat stone and 239.93 cubic yards of backing stone made ready
for the lock-walls.

The work of improving the open-river navigation above the lock and
dam was confined to repairing the chute at Glenville, owing to the small
balance of funds available.

For further details of the work done during the fiscal year reference
is made to the annexed report of Mr. B. F. Thomas, the resident en-
gineer.

The estimate of $51,800, as the amount required to complete the ap-
proved project, is herewith renewed.

Money statement

Jnly 1, 1887, amoant ayailable |7,784.93

Jaly 1, 18t^, ainonDt expeuded dariug fiscal year, exclasive of

liabilities oatetanding Jnly 1,1887 $7,420.66

July 1, 18:38, outstanding liabilities 30.00

7,450.66

Jalyl, 1888, balance available 334.27

Amount appropriated by act of August 11,1888 25,000.00

Amount available for fiscal year ending June 30, 1889 25, 334. 27

] Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 26, 800. 00

; Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1890 26, 800. 00
I Sabmitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
\ harbor acts of 1866 and 1867.



Commercial atatUiicSf Little Kanawha Biver, W. Fa., for th^ fiscal year 1887-'88.



ArUolM.



Gmln


,,.., bashels


!>.».::;;;;;............


...... ..cubic f(Bet


Lumber


feet,B.M


•m .!!::::::;;;:::.:;:;;;.


barmis


Kailroftdtiea


..... ...... niiin bur


Sl*T«|


do ..


Tanlmrk


. ............cords


woiMi..:.:;:::::.:;;:.:::;;


do


HiscdUneouA


tODf


ToUlexporto

Inporu


y.i'.y.y.y.y.'iiM.'.



Total exports and imports.



Quantities.



3,000

1. 852, 000

4, 777. 700

2.000

316. MO

1, 570, 000

600

100

100



1,000



Average price.



$0. 60 per busbel .....
.18 per cubic foot..

80. 00 per M fuet

LOO per barrel ,

.35 each ,

laooper M

15. 00 per cord ,

2. 00 per cord

100. 00 per ton



100. 00 per ton.



Value.



$i,800

338.360

148. 331

2,900

117. 029

28.260

9,000

200

10,000



646,780
100,000



746,780



The passenger traffic during the year was equivalent to 20,000 passengers tbrouirh
me lock.



REPORT OF MR. B. F. THOMAS, ASSISTANT ENGINEER.

Louisa, Ky., June 30, 1888.

Sir : My annual report for Little Kanawha River is herewith submitted.

The project contemplates the extension of slackwater navigation to the West Fork
t»y tbe construction ot a lock and dam 2 miles above Burning Springs, W. Va., and
the removal of obstructions to navigation in the upper part of the river,

j^a 88 11^



Digitized by VjOOQIC



1794 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY.

Below this now lock, the Little Kanawha Na^vigation Company have four locks and
dams.

The work of quarrying the balance of the stone accessary for Lock No. 5, which was
beguQ Just before the close of the last fiscal year was continued and completed, and
8:U.23 cubic yards of dimension and 258.08 yiuxls of backing stone were quarried and
delivered at lock-site.

Tlie amount of money being somewhat limited^ and the uncertainty of the cost of
qnarrying being proven (owing to the irregularity existing in the ledges), it was
thought best to employ ouly a small force of stone-cutters. This proved reiy satis-
factory and 459.77 cubic yards of cut stone and 229.72 cubic yards of backing were
made ready for the wall.

Owing to the fact that the navigation company had drawn off their pools to make
repairs, we were unable to boat our stone to the lock, a distance of 5 miles, until
after the close of the season's operations.

A contract was made with John F. King to do the boating at 35 cents per cubic
yard, the Government doing the loading and unloading by hired labor, and this work
was done last February and March.

The cost of quarrying was f2,0i3.40 for 1,089.31 cubic yards ; of cutting, $2,2^.53
for 689.49 cubic yards; miscellaneous expenses for plant, superiutendeuoe, transpor-
tation of derricks, tools, etc., $1»023.72.

It is desired, when money is available, to continue the cutting of stone and prepare
to complete the lock.

Nearly all the coping and many of the quoins are yet to be cut before we can do
much toward the building.

ABOVE WEST FORK.

The improvement of open river navigation on the upper river was, owing to the
small amount of money on baud, confined to the repairs of chute at Gleuville. The
lower cross-timber was replaced and well fastened by inch spikes 4^ feet long, driven
into the soft rock below. Twenty-five cubic yHrds of rock were broken in the chnt<



Online LibraryUnited States. Mississippi River Commission United States. Army. Corps of EngineersAnnual report of the Chief of Engineers to the Secretary of War for ..., Part 3 → online text (page 53 of 103)