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March 10 in the spring semester. May be taken following Bios 21 1 in the fall or in the spring
semester. Enrollment limited to 60. Everyone must attend Monday lecture and one afternoon lab
section. Prerequisite: Bios 211.

Stajf
\ ■
301(F) BIOCHEMISTRY (3-0 3)

The third in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Structure and
function of proteins, enzymes, and nucleic acids. Molecular Biology. Prerequisites: Chem 211,
212, Bios 201, 202, or permission of instructor.

; Corner, R., Olson, J.

302(S) BIOCHEMISTRY (3 0-3)

The last in an integrated sequence of four courses (Bios 201, 202, 301, 302). Introduction to
metabolism, membranes, electron transport, oxidative phosphorylation, general metabolism, and
regulation. Prerequisite: Bios 301 or permission of instructor.

Palmer, G., Rudolph, F.

310 INDEPENDENT STUDY FOR UNDERGRADUATES

An independent program of study for students with previous training in the biosciences. A research
paper is a required part of this course. Up to 4 hours of Bios 310 credit may be obtained per
semester. If taken for 2 or more credits, this course can be counted as one of the two additional Bios
lab courses required for the biochemistry or biology major. It does not count as a Group A or B
course. This course does not count toward credit for a biology or biochemistry major. Prerequi-
sites: Bios 201, 202, 3 credits of Bios lab, and permission of supervising faculty member and the
departmental chair.

Rudolph, F., Sass, R.

311 LAB MODULE IN PROTEIN PURIFICATION (14-1)

Introduction to biochemical laboratory techniques with an emphasis on study of proteins. Course
taught for first half of fall and spring semesters. Enrollment limited to 24 per section. Prerequisites:
Bios 211, prior or current enrollment in Bios 301 , or permission of instructor.

Cooper, B.

312 LAB MODULE IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 1(14-1)

Introduction to microbiological and molecular biology techniques. Course taught for second half
of fall and spring semesters. Enrollment limited to 28 per section. Prerequisites: Bios 2 1 1 . 3 1 1 . and
current or prior enrollment in Bios 301, or permission of instructor.

(F) Bennett, C, Cooper. B., Stewart, C.
(S) Cooper, B., Gibson, S., Comer, R.

313(S) LAB MODULE IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY H (1 4-1)

Introduction to DNA sequencing techniques. Course taught for first half of semester only.

Enrollment limited to 28 per section. Prerequisite: Bios 3 1 1 or permission of instructor.

Cooper, B., Gibson, S., Comer, R.



234 COURSES / Biosciences

314(S) LAB MODULE IN CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL
BIOLOGY(l 4 1)

Experiments in modem cell biology — content variable. Starts following midsemester break. May
alternate with Bios 318. Meets two days per week. Prerequisites: Bios 21 1 and 341 or permission
of instructor. Enrollment limited.

Caprette, D.

315(F) LAB MODULE IN PHYSIOLOGY (14 1)

A laboratory-oriented short course in membrane, nerve, and muscle physiology. Meets two days
per week following midsemester break. Enrollment limited. Prerequisites: Bios 21 1 and 301.

Caprette, D.

316(F) LAB MODULE IN ECOLOGY (1-4-1)

Field and lab experiments in ecology. Course taught for one-half semester. Prerequisite: Bios 213.

Corequisite: Bios 325.

Harcombe, P., Fulton, M.

317(S) LAB MODULE IN BEHAVIOR (1-4-1)

Field experiments in behavior. Work in teams to solve the mystery of breeding systems in wild

mockingbirds and grackles. Prerequisites: Bios 213 and 321.

Strassmann, J., Staff

318(S) LAB MODULE IN MICROBIOLOGY (1-41)

Self-paced studies include the isolation, culture, and identification of bacteria from mixed cultures
and natural sources, using a variety of culture and observation techniques. Meets two days per
week following midsemester break. Prerequisite: Bios 21 1 and permission of instructor. May
alternate with Bios 314. Enrollment limited.

Caprette, D.

321(F) ANIMAL BEHAVIOR (3 3) Group B

Evolutionary theory is used to evaluate behavioral adaptations of organisms to their environment.
Prerequisite: Bios 202 or permission of instructor.

Strassmann, J.

322(S) GLOBAL ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS (3-0-3) Group B

A systems analysis of Earth from a biological perspective stressing biogeochemical cycles and

global change. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, or permission of instructor. Offered alternate years

(odd).

Sass, R., Fisher, F.

324(S) WETLAND ECOSYSTEMS (3 3) Group B.

A study of coastal wetland systems including floodplains, freshwater, brackish, and saline marshes
and consideration of estuarine and river interaction with coastal marine waters. Prerequisites: Bios
201, 202, 325, 329, 336, or permission of instructor. Offered alternate years (even).

Fisher, F., Sass, R.

325(F) ECOLOGY (4-0-4) Group B.

Analysis of population dynamics, species interactions, plant and animal community organization,
and ecosystem function. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, or junior standing in a science/engineering
major, or permission of instructor.

Fulton, M.

329(F) ANIMAL DIVERSITY (3 3) Group B.

The evolution and systematics of the animal kingdom with consideration of the functional
morphology, comparative physiology, and behavior. Prerequisites; Bios 201, 202, or permission
of instructor.

Fisher, F.



Biosciences 235

334(S) EVOLUTION (3-0-3) Group B.

Principles of biological evolution. Topics include natural selection, adaptation, molecular evolu-
tion, formation of new species, the fossil record, biogeography, and principles of classification.
Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, or permission of instructor.

Quellen D.

336(S) PLANT DIVERSITY (3-0-3) Group B

Analysis of the physiology, morphology, and evolution of plants in terms of adaptation to

environment. Not offered every year. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202.

Staff

341(F) CELL BIOLOGY (3 0-3) Group A

Molecular mechanisms of the processes common to all cells, including exposition of structure,
function, and biogenesis of all subcellular organelles. Emphasis will be on cytoplasmic events;
molecular studies of transcription will be taught in Bios 344. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, and
current or prior registration in Bios 301, or permission of instructor.

Braam, J., de Hostos, E.

343(F) DEVELOPMENT (3-0-3) Group A.

Analysis of the processes and principles of development as seen in a broad spectrum of eukaryotic

organisms. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, or permission of instructor.

Subtelny, S.

344(S) MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS (3 3) Group A.

Analysis of transmission, function, and molecular structure of the genetic material. Prerequisites:

Bios 201, 202, and 301, or permission of instructor.

Stewart, C.

352(S) PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY FOR THE BIOSCIENCES (3 3) Group A.

Selected aspects of physical chemistry as it relates to the biosciences, including thermodynamics,
reaction rate theory, quantum mechanics, and atomic and molecular structure. Prerequisites: Chem
211,212, Phys 125, 126, or 101, 102, Bios 301, or permission of instructor.

Nikonowicz, E., Olson, J.

390 TRANSFER CREDIT IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY

(3-0-3) Group A.

391 TRANSFER CREDIT IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY BIOL-
OGY (3-0-3) Group A.

401(F) UNDERGRADUATE HONORS RESEARCH (0- 15-5)

Open only to undergraduate majors who meet specific requirements and with the permission of the

research supervisor and chair. Prerequisites: Bios 20 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302, and 4 credits of biosciences

lab modules. Corequisite: Bios 411. Registration for Bios 401/402 implies a commitment to

participate in research for at least two semesters.

Staff



402(S) UNDERGRADUATE HONORS RESEARCH (0-15-5)
See Bios 401. Corequisite: Bios 412.



Staff



411(F) UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (10 1)

Discussion of current research under investigation in area. Corequisite: Bios 401.

Rudolph. F., Sass, R.



236 COURSES / Biosciences

412(S) UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SEMINAR (1-0-1)

See Bios 411. Corequisite: Bios 402.

Rudolph, F., Sass, R.

421(S) NEUROBIOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A.

Cellular and molecular mechanisms of nervous system function. Emphasis on membrane and
synaptic biophysics, sensory and motor systems, neuronal plasticity, and development. Prerequi-
sites: Bios 201, 202, 301, 302.

Giant z, R.

422(S) ENDOCRINOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A.

Molecular and cellular mechanisms of hormone synthesis and of target cell responses; hormonal

interactions in mammaUan homeostasis. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301, 302.

Campbell, W.

423(F) IMMUNOBIOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A.

Cellular and molecular basis of immune function in mammals. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301,

302.

Campbell, W.

424(S) MICROBIOLOGY AND BIOTECHNOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A.
Structure and function of microorganisms with emphasis on their environmental, industrial, and
medical importance. Prerequisites: Bios 20 1 , 202, and 301 , or permission of instructor. Corequisite:
Bios 302 or permission of instructor.

Bennett, G.

425(F) PLANT MOLECULAR BIOLOGY (3-0-3) Group A.
Novel aspects of plant biology and development, with emphasis on molecular and genetic
mechanisms. Plant responses to the environment and the use of bioengineering and other means
to develop new plant products will also be covered. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, 301, or
permission of instructor.

Braam, J., Gibson, S.

432(S) ADVANCED EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY (3-0-3) Group B.
In-depth study of selected topics in evolutionary theory and their application to behavior and
adaptation. Topics may include kin selection, sexual selection, molecular evolution, evolution of
disease, systematics, and population genetics. Prerequisites: Bios 201, 202, and either 321 or 334.

Stajf

442(S) SPECIALIZED CELL FUNCTION (3-0 3) Group A

The structure/function speciaUzations seen in selected types of cells and tissues in higher animals.

Prerequisites: Bios 20 1.202, 301, and 302. Bios 341 is recommended as a prerequisite. Not offered

1996-97.

Stajf

445(F) ADVANCED MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND

GENETICS (3-0-3) Group A.
Molecular and genetic aspects of the regulation of gene expression as seen in simple prokaryotic
systems and the model eukaryotic systems used for studies of development. Prerequisites: Bios
201, 202, 301, and 344, or permission of instructor.

Beckingham, K., Stem, M.,

481(F) MOLECULAR BIOPHYSICS (3-0-3) Group A.

Examination, at an intermediate level, of interaction of light with matter, UV-visible absorption,
natural optical activity, fluorescence, EXAFS, EPR, NMR of biomolecules, x-ray diffraction and
crystallography, neutron scattering, electron microscopy, and theoretical protein dynamics.
Prerequisites: Bios 301 and 352, or permission of instructor.

Palmer, G., Phillips, G.



Biosciences 237

482(S) ADVANCED MOLECULAR AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOPHYSICS

(2-3-3) Group A.
Emphasis on advanced spectroscopy or structure analysis including computational aspects of
molecular biophysics. Spectroscopy and structure are emphasized in alternate years.
Spring 1997. Structure Analysis. Advanced treatment of the areas of x-ray diffraction and
crystallography, neutron .scattering, electron micro.scopy. theoretical protein dynamics, protein
folding, fast kinetics, and protein engineering. Prerequisites: Bios 301. 352. Bios 481 is recom-
mended. Working knowledge of Fortran. C. or MATLAB is also required.

Phillips, G.
Spring 1998. Spectroscopy. Advanced treatment of interaction of light with matter, absorption,
naturally and magnetically induced optical activity. EPR. and NMR^of biomolecules. Prerequi-
sites: Bios 30 1 . 352. Bios 48 1 is recommended. Working knowledge of a programming language,
such as Fortran. C, Basic, MATLAB, or Pascal, or permission of instructor.

Nikonowicz, E.

541 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY
BIOLOGY (3-0-3)

' ■ ■ '' - ■ ■ ' Staff

561(F) TOPICS IN EVOLUTION (2 2)

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in evolution. Prerequisite: graduate
status or permission of chair and instructor.

Quelle r, D., Strassmann, J.

562(S) TOPICS IN BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY (2 2)

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in animal behavior. Prerequisite:
graduate status or permission of chair and instructor.

Strassmann, J., Quelle r, D.

563(F) TOPICS IN ECOLOGY (2-0 2)

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in forest and grassland ecology.

Prerequisite: graduate status or permission of chair and instructor.

Harcombe, P.

564(S) TOPICS IN CONSERVATION ECOLOGY (2-0 2)

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in conservation biology. Prerequisite:

graduate status or permission of chair and instructor.

Harcombe, P.

565(F) TOPICS IN WETLAND BIOLOGY (2-0-2)

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in wetland ecosystems. Prerequisite:

graduate status or permission of chair and instructor.

Fisher, F., Sass, R.

566(S) TOPICS IN GLOBAL ECOSYSTEM DYNAMICS (2 2)

Review and discussion of the literature on current research in regional and global ecosystem
dynamics. Prerequisite: graduate status or permission of chair and instructor.

Sass, R., Fisher, F.

567(F) RESEARCH METHODS IN FIELD BIOLOGY (2 0-2)

Introduction of first-year graduate students to the field research techniques and practices of

individual faculty members. Prerequisite: graduate status or permission of chair.

Staff

575(F) INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL

BIOLOGY(l 1)

Introduction of first-year graduate students to the research programs and laboratories ot individual

faculty members.

Stciff



238 COURSES / Biosciences

581(F) GRADUATE SEMINAR IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY

(1-0-1)
A discussion of selected research topics. Required of all biochemistry and cell biology graduate
students.

Rudolph, F.

582(S) GRADUATE SEMINAR IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIO-
LOGY (1-0-1)
See Bios 581.

Rudolph, F.

583(F) GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FIRST- YEAR STUDENTS IN

BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (2-0-2)
Review of literature on current biosciences research.



584(S) GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR FIRST-YEAR STUDENTS IN

BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (2-0-2)
See Bios 583.



Stajf



Staff



585 GRADUATE SEMINAR IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTIONARY
BIOLOGY (1-0-1)

Faculty and student presentations on current research. Required of all EEB graduate students.

Queller, D.

587(F) GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS IN

BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (2-0-2)
Review of literature on current biosciences research. Prerequisite: graduate status in biochem-
istry and cell biology, second year.

Staff

588(S) GRADUATE SEMINAR FOR SECOND-YEAR STUDENTS IN

BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL BIOLOGY (2-0-2)
See Bios 587.

Staff

590 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY & CELL
BIOLOGY (Variable)

Development of specific topic areas at the graduate level. Prerequisite: graduate status or
permission of chair and instructor.

. Staff

591 GRADUATE TEACHING (10 1)

Supervised instruction in teaching ecology and evolutionary biology. Prerequisite: graduate
standing in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Staff

592 SEMINAR IN COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY (10 1)

A discussion of selected research topics in computational biology. Prerequisites: graduate
status or permission of chair and instructor.

Phillips, G.

611(F) RESEARCH SEMINAR (3 3)

Discussion of individual laboratory research or current topics in particular areas. Corequisite:
Bios 800 or permission of instructor.

Staff



612(S) RESEARCH SEMINAR (3 3)

Continuation of Bios 611.



621(F) THESIS SEMINAR (10 1)
622(S) THESIS SEMINAR (10 1)
800 GRADUATE RESEARCH (Variable)



Biosciences 239

Stajf
Staff
Staff
Staff



i

•'1. ^1-



240

Chemical Engineering



The George R. Brown School of Engineering



Professor J.W. Hightower, Chair

Professors Armeniades, Davis, Dyson, Heliums,

Hirasaki, Mclntire, Miller, Robert, San, and Zygourakis

Adjunct Professor G. D. Fisher

Associate Professors W. Chapman, Mikos, and Shanks

Adjunct Associate Professors Carnahan and House

Assistant Professor Badgwell

Adjunct Assistant Professor Moorhead

Degrees Offered: B.A., B.S., M.Ch.E., M.S., Ph.D.

Undergraduate Program. The undergraduate curriculum in chemical engineer-
ing is designed to provide a sound scientific and technical basis for further professional
development. Concurrently, the student has the opportunity to concentrate on a particu-
lar technical specialty, such as applied mathematics, biomedical engineering, biotech-
nology, environmental quality, kinetics and catalysis, chemical reaction engineering,
engineering economics, petroleum production, solid state materials, or polymer science
and engineering.

In the four-year undergraduate curriculum, a student may qualify for either the
Bachelor of Arts degree or the Bachelor of Science degree. The Bachelor of Arts
program is highly flexible and allows a student to pursue other areas of interest with or
without a double major. The Bachelor of Science program has a higher content of
required scientific and professional courses. On completion of either bachelor's pro-
gram, a student is eligible to apply for a fifth year of specialized study leading to the
degree of Master of Chemical Engineering. The undergraduate curriculum is designed
so that outstanding students interested in careers in research and teaching may enter
graduate school after either bachelor's degree.

The Department of Chemical Engineering specifies 73 semester hours for the B.A.
degree, prerequisites and laboratory courses included. In addition to these requirements,
students must also satisfy the distribution requirements and complete no fewer than 62
semester hours outside the departmental requirements for a total of at least 1 35 semester
hours.

The department specifies 100 semester hours for a B.S. degree, which is accredited
by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET). Students enrolled
in the B.S. program must take:

Chem 111, 112(or 101, 102), 105,211,212,213,214,311,312

Ceng 301, 302, 303, 343, 390, 401, 402, 403, 404, 411, 412, 443, 444, 470

Math 101, 102. 21 1, 212 or equivalent honors courses

Caam 335 (or Math 381)

Phys 101, 102

Computing requirements: Caam 21 1

Mech211

An approved basic science course

Two courses selected from Elec 241, Msci 301, Civi 300, Envi 534, and Ceng 503



Chemical Engineering 241

In addition to these courses, students must satisfy the distribution requirements and
complete sufficient courses outside the departmental requirements for a total of at least
135 semester hours. A specific B.A. with double majors in chemical engineering and
biochemistry is available. A new specific B.S. in chemical engineering plus an
environmental engineering option is also offered. Both these elective options will be
mentioned explicitly on one's transcript.

Graduate Program. Graduate study in chemical engineering can lead to the
Master of Chemical Engineering, the Master of Science, or the Doctor of Philosophy.
University requirements for the professional degree M.Ch.E. are given on page 1 39. The
department requires that at least six of the courses taken must be at the advanced level
in chemical engineering. In addition, two semesters of chemical engineering design,
courses in process control and computer science, and an approved mathematics course
must have been taken at some time in the student's curriculum.

University requirements for the research degrees M.S. and Ph.D. are outlined on
pages 136-137.

Candidates for the Master of Science degree are required to complete a minimum
of 18 approved semester hours with high standing. They must also submit an original
research thesis and defend it in a public oral examination.

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree must demonstrate competence in
the areas of applied mathematics, thermodynamics, transport processes, and chemical
kinetics and reactor design by passing qualifying examinations, normally during the first
year of study. They must also complete a minimum of 36 approved semester hours with
high standing and submit a thesis that provides evidence of their ability to carry out
original research in a specialized area of chemical engineering. With departmental
approval, the course requirements may be reduced to 24 hours for students already
having an M.S. degree. The thesis must be defended in a public oral examination.

Prerequisites for Undergraduate Chemical Engineering Courses

Ceng301 Math 101, 102; Chem 111, 112 (or 101, 102); co-/prerequisite Ceng 303

Ceng 302 Ceng 301; co-/prerequisites Math 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 and Caam 2 1 1

Ceng 390 Ceng 301; Math 211,212; co-/prerequisites Chem 31 1 and Ceng 343

Ceng 401 Phys 101, 102; Ceng 302

Ceng 402 Ceng 401

Ceng 403 Ceng 302, 390, 402, 411; co-/prerequisite Mech 2 1 1

Ceng 404 Ceng 403; co-/prerequisite Ceng 412, 470

Ceng 4 1 1 Chem 311; Ceng 302; co-/prerequisite Chem 3 1 2

Ceng 412 Ceng 411

Ceng 470 Ceng 390, 401, 411

Note: With the written consent of the instructor, a student may register for a course
without having completed the required prerequisite(s), but such consent can be expected
only in unusual circumstances and will not carry forward. For example, if the instructor
for Ceng 4 1 1 waives Chem 3 1 1 for a person, then the person, upon completing Ceng 411,
may not proceed to Ceng 412 without the consent of that instructor, since Chem 3 1 1 is
an implied prerequisite for Ceng 412.

Chemical Engineering Courses

301(F) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS (3-0-3)
Use of basic mathematical concepts, physical laws, stoichiometry, and the thermodynamic
properties of matter to obtain material and energy balances for steady and unsteady state systems.
Required for sophomores intending to major in chemical engmeenng. Corequisite: Leng iUi



242 COURSES / Chemical Engineering

302(S) SEPARATION PROCESSES (3-3-4)

Analysis and design of single and multistage contacting operations mvolvmg bmary and multi-
component systems. r^ r^

Dyson, D.

303(F) MATLAB FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERS (0-3-1)

Teaches students how to use workstations and the computer language MATLAB that is applied
extensively in Ceng 301. Course is a corequisite for students enrolled in Ceng 301.

Davis Jr., S.

343(F) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB I (1-3-2)

Experiments demonstrating the principles presented in Ceng 301, 302, and 390.

Hightower, J.

390(F) KINETICS AND REACTOR DESIGN (3 0-3)

Principles and significance of chemical kinetics, procedures for evaluating kinetic parameters
from reaction rate data, application of these methods to design and predict the performance of
various types of ideal and nonideal chemical reactors in both homogeneous and heterogenous

systems. r,- , r

. Hightower, J.

401(F) TRANSPORT PHENOMENA I (3 0-3)

Fundamental principles of heat, mass, and momentum transport applied to the continuum, analysis

of macroscopic physical systems based on the continuum equations, applications in chemical

engineering practice. ^ ^

Dyson, D.

402(S) TRANSPORT PHENOMENA II (3-0-3)

Continuation of Ceng 401. ^^ „ ,

Heliums, J.

403(F) EQUIPMENT DESIGN (3-3-4)

Design and economic analysis of chemical process equipment. Use of computer-design packages

in the analysis of chemical equipment. ^ . . ^

Davis Jr., b.

404(S) PROCESS DESIGN (3-3-4)

Optimal design of chemical processes, industrial economic pnnciples, special process design

projects in small groups.

^ ■' Badgwell, T.

411(F) THERMODYNAMICS I (3-0-3)

Development and application of the first and second laws of thermodynamics.

Robert, M.

412(S) THERMODYNAMICS H (3 0-3)

Advanced treatment of chemical and phase equilibrium in multicomponent systems. Includes a

detailed study of nonideal solutions.

Chapman, w.

420(F) BIOSYSTEMS TRANSPORT AND REACTION PROCESSES (3 3)

Covers basic principles of transport and reaction phenomena applied to analyze momentum, heat,
and mass transport and reaction processes occurring in the human body. Emphasis given to the
mathematical modeUng of systems to describe their physiologic function, understand pathological
conditions, and design bioartificial organs. Major thrust will be quantitative charactenzation oi
biomedical systems in relation to underiying molecular mechanism and cellular behavior
Prerequisites: Math 211,212. Mk A



Chemical Engineering 243

443(F) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB II ( 1 -3 2)

Experiments demonstrating transport coefficient measurement, forced and free convection
transfer operations, and thermodynamic principles as covered in Ceng 401 . 402, and 41 1 .

Dyson, D.

444(S) CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LAB III ( 1 -3 2)

Same as Ceng 443.

Dyson, D.



Online LibraryUnited States. National Archives and Records ServiRice University General announcements (Volume 1996/97) → online text (page 27 of 59)