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and decreasing in depth to zero at low tide.

Huntington village lies about a mile south of the head of the harbor;
it has 4,000 to 5,000 population.

The mean rise of tide is 7.2 feet.

PROJECTS FOR IMPROVEMENT.

By act of Congress approved March 3, 1871, a survey of this harbor
was authorized. It was made in that year, and, with the report (dated
December 11, 1871, and printed in the Annual Report of the Chief of
Eugineers for 1872, p. 907), was submitted an estimate of $22,780 as
the cost of dredging out a shoal at the entrance to the harbor, and of
extending the 8-foot channel 150 feet wide for about 2,000 feet up to
the old wharf, the i) roper ty of the town.

• By act of Congress of Juno 10, 1872, $22,500 was appropriated for
the harbor, and the project for improvement was completed in April,
1873, the outer shoal being removed to 8 feet depth and the 8-foot
channel being extended 2,200 feet t-o the old town wharf; the width of
150 feet was, however, reduced to 130 feet in the last 900 feet length,
on account of exhaustion of funds. It had been contemplated to dump
most of the dredged material on the flats in the harbor, but on account
of much local opposition this was abandoned after about 2,000 yards
had been dumped there, and the rest of the dredged material was
deposited in deep water in Long Island Sound. The amount dredged
was 91,786 cubic yards.

The river and harbor act of July 5, 1884, ordered a survey or exam-
ination of this harbor. A survey was made the same year, the report
of which (printed in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for
1885, p. 703, et seq.) contains a plan for restoring and maintaining the
depth of 8 feet, made by dredging in 1872 and 1873, but subsequently
lost by settling of the banks, with estimate of cost for carrying the
channel up to the old town dock, as follows:

Dredging 84,000 cubic yards, at 2o cents per cubic yard $21, 000

Pilo protection, 1,400 linear feet, at $5 per linear foot 7, 000

28,000
Superintendence and contingencies 4» 000

Total 32,000

with an estimate of additional cost of $10,000, should it be dei'ided to
carry the channel up to the last wharf on the east side, a distance of
800 feet ftirther.



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APPENDIX D REPORT OP LIEUT. COL. ROBERT, 699

The beginniug of work imder this project was approved by the Sec-
retary of War, November 3, 1890, after an appropriation for the improve-
ment had been made by Congress.

Up to July 1, 1893, the 8-foot channel had been dredged 105 feet wide
up to the bend at and near Old Town Wliarf. with width of 185 feet at
the bend and with 90 feet width above the oend nearly to the upper
landing of the harbor. No work had been done on the projected pile
protection.

A sketch of the upper part of Huntington Ilarbor was printed in the
Annual Eeport of the Chief of Engineers for 1893, p. 970.

OPERATIONS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1894.

Nothing was done.

PRESENT CONDITION OF IMPROVEMENT.

The channel is now 105 feet wide uj) to the bend at and near Old Town
Wharf, 185 feet wide at the bend, and about 90 feet wide above the
bend nearly to the upper landing in the harbor; the channel is in good
condition. ]S"o work has been done on the projected pile protection.

PROPOSED OPERATIONS.

It is x)roposed to apply future appropriations to completing the chan-
nel and to maintaining it by further dredging or by diking, as seems
expedient.

Appropriations for improving Huntington Harbor have been made
as follows :



Application.



I
Date. Amount.



Dmlging Juno 10, 1872 $22,500

Do I Sept. 19, 1890 10,000



Do.
Total .



July 13, 1802



5, GOV



937,500



Hnntington Harbor is in (he New York oollection district.

The uearest hght-honse is on Eaton Point, at the east side of the mouth of Ilunt-
infi^ton hay, about 4 miles distant from the harbor.

The nearest works of defense are the fortifications at Willets Point, about 20 miles
westward.

Money statement.

.Tnly 1, 1893, balance unexpended $397.49

June 30, 1894, amount expended during fiscal year 187. 50

July 1, 1894, balance unexpended 209.99

{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existinja^ project 17, 000. 00

Amountthatcanbefitofitably expended in fiscal year ending June 30, 1896 10, 000. 00
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of March 8, 1893.



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700 REPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY.

COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR TIIK CALKXDAR YEAR 1893.

Arrivals and departures of vessels,
[Draft, 4 to D feet ; tonDage, 60 to 450 tons.]



Kind of vessels.



Kumber ,

of round

trips.



-ARKTOgate
tonnage of
all tnps.



Steamers

Sailing vessels
Barges ,

Total...



195

450

14



659 ,



78.000

85.000

6,000



160.000



Freight received and shipped by water.



Chief articles.



Tons (es- , Estimated
timatcd) i valne.



Receipts...
Shipments.




$660,000
285.000



The above fibres show an increase in tonnage of freight of 2,000 tons since 1892,
when 44,000 tons were reported.

No new lines of transportation have been reported since Jnly 1, 1893.

The year 1893 was about an average year for commerce, but, if anything, there
was a slight increase, notwithstanding a general business depression. Tlie above
are mostly estimates, no official shipping list being kept. Our people all agree that
the appropriations have been well expended. The additional width given to the
channel greatly increases its usefulnoss. There seems to bo little, if auy, shoaling
of the channel where excavated, which would indicate that mnch diking or piling
would be inexpedient. Additional width is most important. Additional appropria-
tions are earnestly hoped for, so that the work may be completed according to the
Engineers' recommendations.

Charlkb R. Strekt,
Chuirmanf Huntington Harbor Improvement Committee,

May 1, 1894.



D 23.



IMPROVEMENT OF GLEN COVE HARBOR, NEW YORK.

Glen Gove Harbor is a small estuary or creek opening into the east
side of Hempstea<l Bay, Long Island, about If miles from Long Island
Sound and about 27 miles by water from the liattery, New York City.
The cliauuel in the creek is about 2 feet deep at mean low water, and a
bar at the entrance has a foot less depth. Vessels entering Glen Cove
Harbor have to wait for high tide, anchoring in Hempstead Bay, where
they are exposed to storms from the north and northwest. When such
storms are heavy it is impossible to tow over the bar, and from this
cause vessels have been obliged to remain in the bay for three or four
days exposed to heavy seas.

The mean rise of tide in this harbor is 7.7 feet.



PROJECT FOR IMPROVEMENT.



The act of Congress, approved August 5, 1886, provided for a survey
or examination of Glen Cove Harbor. A preliminary examination was
all that was deemed necessary, and upon this, with the assistance of



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APPENDIX D — REPORT OP LIEUT. COL. ROBERT. 701

the U. S. Coast Survey charts recently published, a report with esti-
mates of cost of improvements was presented, dated December 7, 1886,
and printed in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1887,
Part I, p. 645.

The plan of improvement described in this report contemplated a
breakwater about 2,600 feet long and extending in a general westerly
direction from Mosquito Point on the east side of Hempstead Bay and
north of the entrance of Glen Cove Inlet, the breakwater to be built of
riprap, the top to be 5 feet wide and 3 feet above high water, with side
slopes of 1 upon 1, at an estimated cost as follows :

136,000 tons of riprap, at $1.35 per ton $183,600

Contiugeucles, 10 per cent 18, 360

Total 201,960

This project was adopted in 1888, an appropriation being made by
Congress for beginning the work, and the location of the shore end of
the breakwater was definitely fixed to be at the northwest corner of the
Glen Cove Dock and its course to be west-southwesterly toward Mott
Point.

Up to July 1, 1893, 1,056 linear feet of the breakwater had been
built, 1,000 feet of which was 3 feet wide on top, with the top 4 feet
above high water, the outer 56 feet being 3 feet wide on top at 1 foot
above high water. A contract for enlarging and extending the break-
water was in progress.

A sketch' of part of Hempstead Bay, showing Glen Cove Harbor
.improvement, was printed in the Annual Eeport of the Chief of Engi-
neers for 1889, p. 728.

OPERATIONS DUEING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 1894.

At the beginning of the year, work of enlarging and extending the
breakwater was in progress under a contract with Brown & Fleming,
dated October 4, 1892, for delivering and placing about 13,000 tons of
riprap at 69 cents per ton. This work was continued until August 9,
1893, when the contract was completed.

During the fiscal year 3,300 tons of riprap were delivered and placed,
enlarging the outer 56 linear feet of the work to 3 feet top width at 4
feet above high water and extending the breakwater 20 feet, with the
same cross section. At the extreme outer end the work was built 3 feet
higher to serve as a temporary beacon.

Under the entire contract 11,550 tons of riprap were delivered, of
which 9,900 tons were used in enlarging the previously built work (1,056
feet in length) and 1,650 tons were used in extending the breakwater 20
feet.

PRESENT CONDITION OF IMPROVEMENT.

The breakwater is now 1,076 feet long on top, the top being 3 feet
wide and 4 feet above mean high water, the extreme outer or western
end being built 3 feet higher to serve as a temporary beacon.

PROPOSED OPERATIONS.

Future appropriations should be applied to further extending the
breakwater, as provided by the approved project.



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702 BKPORT OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINeSSs, L\ B. ARMY.

Appropriations for iinprovin<r Gleu Cove Harbor, New York, have
been made aa follows:





Application.


Date.


Amount


Breakwater


Aug. 11, 1886
Sopl 19, 1880
Jvdy 13, 1892


$20,000


Do


15.000


Do - -


10,000








Total


45,000











Glen Covo Harbor is in tho collection dlHtrict of New York ; the nearest ligbt-bonfte
is on Sands Point, about 4 miles west; Fort Schuyler, New York Harbor, is the nearest
work of defense.

Money statement,

July 1, 1893, balance unexpended $6,795.05

Juno 30, 1894, amount expended during fiscal year 6, 562. 82



July 1, 1894, balance unexpended...
July 1, 1894, outstanding liabilities.

July 1, 1894, balance available



232.23
16.00



216.23



{Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 156, 960. 00
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscalyear ending June 30, 1896 50, 000. 00
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2.of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 aud of sundry civil act of March 3, 1893.



Abstract of contract for improving Glen Cove Harbor, New YorJc,in force during the^^acai

year ending June 30, 1894,



Kamo and address of
cou tractor.



Brown & Fleming,
IJew York City.



^''u-Sct*!""* 'Snbjoct of contract.



Oct. 4, 1892



Delivery of riprap
and enlarjremeut
aud extension of
breakwater.



Prico
per ton,
riprap.



$0.60



Kemarks.



Contract completed Ans. 9. 1893 :
amount of riprap delivered,
11,550 tons.



COMMERCIAL STATISTICS FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1893.

Arrivals and departures of vessels,
[Draft, 4i to 9^ feet; tonnage, 35 to 280 tons.]



Steamers

Sailing vessels.
J!arge.H



Total .



Kind of vessels.



Number

of round

trips.



520
104
500



1,124



Aggregate

tonnage of

all trips.



182.000

10.400

225,00i»



417. 400



Freight received and shipped by water.



Chief articles.



Receipts : Com, coal, lumber, merehandiso, and miscellaneous articles

Shipinents : Starch, glucose, com, feed, fire clay, garden and farm products,
oyst«r», fish



Tons.



100,000
145,000



! £»timatecl
value.



$2,225,000
3,800,000



The above figures show an increase in tonnage of freight of 3,571 tons since 1889,
the last year when such statistics were received. ^-^ ,

/Google



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APPENDIX D^REPORT Of LIEUT. COL. ROBERT. 703

Vessels Vitilt (I'liring 1893 (5 merchant vessels and 21 y aclits) 26

Vessels repaired in 1893 (ranging from 15 to 125 tons) • 50

Vessels anchored behind the breakwater for shel^r during 1893 '. 1, 500

No new lines of transportation have been established since July 1, 1893.



letter ov mr. s. d. phelps.

The National Starch Manufacturing Co.,

No. 1 Broadway J New York, Jpril 19, 1894,
Sir: I inclose herewith an estimate of the commerce of Glen Cove Harbor, New
York, for the current year 1893. The statement is merely an estimate, because no
official records are kept from which to obtain exact data.

The breakwater as far as completed has been of undoubted benefit, not only as to the
permanency and depth of the channel, but also in making the harbor more secure for
vessels in fogs and heavy weather. During the year npon^difierent occasions more
than a hundred vessels at a time sought shelter from storms behind the breakwater.
During seven or eight months of the j-ear two steamers, one for passengers and
the other for freight, make daily trips to and from New York. A large amount of
freight traffic is also done by sailing vessels, barges, and canal boats.
There are three ship yards in the harbor lor the building and repair of vessels.
Yours, respectfully,

S. D. Phelps.
Col. Henry M. Robert,

Engineer Office^ U.S,A,



D 24.

IMPROVEMENT OF FLUSHING BAY, NEW YORK. '

Flushing Bay is on the north shore of Long Island, about 14 miles
by water from tlie Battery, New York City. The town of Flushing
is on the east bank of Flushing Creek, just above the head of the
bay. The bay is about 1 mile w ide and 2 miles long. The bottom is
of soft mud, nearly level, the depth in the original channel being not
much greater than elsewhere. In 1861 a depth of 5 feet at low water
was reported in the channel leading up to Flushing. At the beginning
of the improvement by the United States the depth there wjis but 3.9
feet. The mean rise of tide is 7.1 feet.

PROJECTS FOR IMPROVEMENT.

A survey of Flushing Bay was made in 1878, and a project for
improvement based upon the survey was proposed and adopted. This
project provided for constructing two dikes, the first to extend north-
erly from the head (or south end) of the bay along the west side of the
channel; then, bending to continue westward to Herrick Point, at the
west side of the mouth of the bay, thus forming a large tidal basin,
which should fill and discharge through the main channel; the second
to start from a point near the middle of the east shore and extend
northwardly to the 6-foot curve, confining the channel. It also pro-
vided for dredging to make and maintain a channel feet deep at mean
low water. The estimated cost of this work was as follows:

Constructing 4,400 linear feet of pile dike, at $10 per foot $44. 000

Constructing 7,800 linear feet of pile dike, at $9 per foot 70, 200

Constructing 900 linear feet of pile dike, at $7.50 per foot 6, 750

Constructing 3«600 linear feet of single piling, at $3.70 per foot 13, 320

For 83,000 cubic yards of dredging, at 20 cents per cubic yard 16, 600

Contingencies 22, 630

Total 173,500

All the timber work of the dike was to be creosoted.

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704 REPORT OP THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY.

The first appropriation was exx^ended in building 3,057 linear feet of
pile dike on the west side of the channel, extending northward from
near the head of the bay. Subsequent appropriations until 1888 were
expended in dredging to make and maintain the required channel depth,
it being found necessary to dredge repeatedly in the same places. The
total amount of material dredged in this i)eriod was about 235,000 cubic
yaids.

In September, 1888, a modification of the original project waa
approved, which provided for "extending the dike northward and
toward the west side of the channel at College Point, and for dre<lging,
omitting the dikes running westerly to Herrick Point, and the single
row of piles on the east side." In 1891, owing to strong opposition to
the dike by a large number of property owners at Flushing, College
Point, and Newtown, further work upon it was discontinued, and the
project was modified to provide for maintaining the channel by dredg-
ing only.

Up to July 1, 1893, 4,663 linear feet of the dike had been built. The
channel, which lias been dredged repeatedly, had fully the required
depth of 6 feet at mean low water, with width of 70 to 100 feet.

A sketch of Flushing Bay was printed in the Annual Report of the
Chief of Engineers for 1889, p. 732.

OPERATIONS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30. 1894.

Nothing -was done.

PRESENT CONDITION OP IMPROVEMENT.

The dike, 4,663 linear feet long, is in poor condition; the outer part
of it, 1,606 feet long, which was left partly completed in 1891, has since
then been much damaged by storms and ice. Further work upon the
dike being discontinued, owing to strong opposition of property owners
along the shores of the bay (see Annual Report of the Chief of Engi-
neers for 1892, Part I, p. 723), it is not proposed to repair this damage.
A small light at the outer (north) end of the dike, maintained by the
Light-House Department, prevents the structure in its present con-
dition being a serious menace to navigation of the bay.

The channel is now fully 6 feet deep at mean low water, with widths
from 70 to 100 feet.

PROPOSED OPERATIONS.

The required depth and nearly the full width having been secured,
the further work desired under the project consists principally in
maintaining the channel.

Appropriations for improving Flushing Bay have been made as fol-
lows:



Application.



Date.



Amonnk



Construction of dike Mar. 8, 1879

Dredging June 14, 1880

Do Mar. 3,1881

Do Aug. 2,1882

Do July 5,1884

Do ' Auff. 5,1888

Con.struution of dike ftnd dredging Aug. 11,1888



Kopairof dike and dredging Sept. 19,1890

Dredging July 13,1892' 10,



920.000
15.000
10,000
5,000
10.000
10,000
15,000
20,000



Total 115,



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Ar^ENDIX D REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. ROBERT. 705

Flnsliing Bay is iu the collection district of Now York. The nearest light-lionse
is on North Brother Island, 3 miles to the northwest. There is a small light on the
north end of tho dike in the hay, maintained hy the Light-House Department.
Fort Schuyler and Willets Point, about 4 miles east from the mouth of the bay, are
the nearest works of defense.

Money statement,

July 1 , 1893, balance unexpended $5, 019. 02

June 30, 1894, amount expended during fiscal year • 4, 427. 77

July 1, 1894, balance unexpended 591. 25

(Amount (estimated) required for completion of existing project 58, 500. 00
Amount that can be profitably expended in fiscal year ending J une 30,1896 20, 000. 00
Submitted in compliance with requirements of sections 2 of river and
harbor acts of 1866 and 1867 and of sundry civil act of March 3, 1893.



COMMEKCIAL STATISTICS FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1898.

These statistics have been asked for but have not been received, the only returns
being for the freight of Beyer's Flushing and College l*oint Line ; the boats of tho
line made 304 round trips, the aggregate tonnage of all trips being 20,330 tons.

No records of harbor commerce are kept at Flushing, and no complete or satisfac-
tory estimates of amounts can be obtained.

For the calendar year 1888, 2,440 vessels were reported arriving and departing,
with 229,235 tons of freight.

No new lines of transportation have been established since July 1, 1893.



D 25.

IMPROVEMENT OF PATCHOGUE RIVER, NEW YORK.

Patcliogue Eiver is a small stream on the south side of Long Island,
emptying into Great South Bay, near its eastern end, and about 55
miles in a direct line cast from I^ew York City. Tho village of Pat-
chogne, which lies about a mile north of the mouth of the river, has a
resident poi)ulation of about 5,000, which is considerably increased
during tho summer months.

The approach to Patchogue River by water is through Fire Island
Inlet, and thence by a rather crooked course for some 14 miles through
Great South Bay; tho depth through the bay and up to within a half
mile of the river's mouth is about 8 feet; at the mouth of the river the
natural depth shoaled \\\} to about 2 feet, which depth could be carried
up to the village landings.

About the year 1870 the State of New York made an appropriation for
improving the entrance to this river. A jetty about 1,000 feet long waa
built from the west side of the mouth of the river and a channel dredged
alongside of it. The jetty Avas built of a single row of sheet piling^
with round piles at intervals of G feet, and riprapped along the sides.
In 1891 about 200 linear feet of the piling remained, but badly injured;
the riprap could be traced for nearly the whole length of the work, but
no trace of the dredged channel remained.

The mean rise of the tide at Patchogue Kiver is 1.1 feet.

ENa 94 45



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706 REPOET OF THE CHIEF OF ENGINEERS, U. S. ARMY.
PROJECTS FOR IMPROVEMENT.

The river and harbor act of June 4, 1880, provided for a survey of
the river, which wa^s made that year; the report dated October 30, 1880,
and printed in the Annual Report of the Chief of Engineers for 1881,
p. 674, contained estimates-for a plan of improvement as follows:

Tho estimate to secure a depth of 6 feet at mean low water by dredgiug iu

the river, and fVom its mouth to the C^foot curve in the bay is $21, 000

For diking, from river to 6-foot curve in bay 15, 800

Engineering, contingencies, etc., 15 per cent 5, 520

Total 42,320

One dike was to be on the west side of the river's mouth, and another
and shorter one on the east side; the total length of the two to be
about 2,400 feet, to bo of carbolized timber filled with riprap, and to be
from 5 to 7 feet wide from out to out.

Nothing had been done toward the desired improvement, and in 1886,
another examination (ordered by the river and harbor act of that
year) was made.

The report on this examination is printed in the Annual Report of
the Chief of Engineers for 1887, p. 759. This report contained a
project and estimate for dredging a channel 60 feet wide and 6 feet
deep from the Highway bridge at Patchogue (4,000 feet above the mouth
of the river) to the 6-foot curve in Great South Bay, a total length
of about a mile, and to protect the channel in the bay by a dike or jetty
on its west side 1,700 feet long. The plan also mentioned the pos-
sible necessity of a dike on the east side, but it was not included in
the estimates, which were as follows:

Dredging from ti»o head of navigation at the bridge to the 6-foot contour in
Great South Bay, the channel being 6() feet wide and 6 feet deep, would
require the removal, by scow measurement, of about 60,000 cubic yards of

sand, at 30 cents per cubic yard $18, 000

Dikinjy, 1,700 linear feet, at $10 per linear foot ! . - . 17, 000

Superintendence, contingencies, etc 5, 000

Total 40,000

Beginning of work under this project was approved by tho Secretaiy
of War October 4, 1890, after the first appropriation tor the improve-
ment had been made.

Up to July 1, 1893, the jetty had been built 1,340 feet long, termi-
nating iu 4 J feet depth of water; the top was 1 foot above high water
and 3 feet wide. The dredged channel had been extended to Gilberts
Point, about 1,200 feet inside the mouth of the river, with width of 60
to 150 feet and depths from 6 to 12 feet, some private dredging having
been done to considerable depths, to obtain material for fining on
marsh lands. The channel outside the mouth of the river has shoaled
somewhat since it was dredged in 1890.

Harbor lines for Patchogue Kiver were establislied by the Secretary
of War under date of January 17, 1894.

A sketch of Patchogue River was printed in the Annual Keport of
the Chief of Engineers for 1893, p. 984.

OPEUATIONS DURING THE FISCAL YEAR ENDIN(J JUNE 30, 1894.

No work of improvement was in progress, the fnuds approxiriated
being practically exhausted.



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APPENDIX D ^REPORT OF LIEUT. COL. ROBERT.



707



All examination of tbo harbor was made and a plan and description
of harbor lines were prepared and reported npon, which' were estab-
lished by approval of the Secretary of War, January 17, 1894.

PRESENT CONDITION OF IMPROVE^EENT.

The channel from Great South Bay to the mouth of the river, dredged



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