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United States. War Dept.

Manual for noncommissioned officers and privates of cavalry of the Army of the United States. 1917. To be also used by engineer companies (mounted) for cavalry instruction and training online

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Online LibraryUnited States. War DeptManual for noncommissioned officers and privates of cavalry of the Army of the United States. 1917. To be also used by engineer companies (mounted) for cavalry instruction and training → online text (page 22 of 30)
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Tlie new sentinel stands fast at a right shoulder until the relief
has passed six paces beyond him, when he walks his post.
The corporals take their places as the relief passes them,

112. Mounted sentinels are posted and relieved in accord-
ance with the same principles.

113. On the return of the old relief, the corporal of the new
guard falls out when the relief halts ; the corporal of the old
guard forms his relief on the left of the old guard, salutes,' and
reports to the commander of his guard : " Sir, the relief is
present"; or "Sir, (so-and-so) is absent," and takes his place
in the guard.

114. To post a relief other than that which is posted when
the old guard is relieved, its corporal commands :

1. (Such) relief, 2. FALL IN; and if arms are stacked, they
are taken at the proper commands.

The relief is formed facing to the front, with arms at an
order, the men place themselves according to the numbers of
their respective posts, viz, two, four, six, and so on, in the
front rank, and one, three, five, and so on, in the rear rank.
The corporal, standing about two paces in front of the center
of his relief, then commands : CALL OFF.

The men call off as prescribed. The corporal then com-
mands : 1. Inspection, 2. ARMS, 3. Order, 4. ARMS; faces the
commander of the guard, executes the rifle salute, reports:
"Sir, the relief is present"; or "Sir, (so-and-so) is absent";
he then takes his place on the right at order tirms.

115. ^^■hen the commander of the guard directs the corporal,
Post your relief, the corporal salutes and posts his relief as
proscribed (Pars. 108 to 111) ; the corporal of the relief on
post does not go with the new relief, except when necessary to
s!iow the way.

116. To dismiss the old relief, it is halted and faced to the
front at the guardhouse by the corporal of the new relief, who
then falls out; the corporal of the old relief then steps in
front of the relief and dismisses it by the proper commands.



MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 269

117. Should the pieces have been loaded before the relief
was posted, the corporal will, before dismissing the relief, see
that n6 cartridges are left in the chambers or magazines. The
same rule applies to sentinels over prisoners.

118. Each corporal will thoroughly acquaint himself with all
the special orders of every sentinel on his relief, and see that
each understands and correctly transmits such orders in detail
to his successor.

119. There should be at least one . noncommissioned officer
constantly on the alert at the guardhouse, usually the corporal
whose relief is on post. This noncommissioned officer takes
post near the entrance of the guardhouse, and does not fall iu
with the guard when it is formed. He will have his rifle con-
stantly with him.

120. Whenever it becomes necessary for the corporal to
leave his post near the entrance of the guardhouse, he will
notify the sergeant of the guard, who will at once take his
place, or designate another noncommissioned officer to do so.

121. He will see that no person enters the guardhouse or
guard tent, or crosses the posts of the sentinels there posted
without proper authority.

122. Should any sentinel call for the corporal of the guard,
the corporal will, in every case, at once and quickly proceed to
such sentinel. He will notify the sergeant of the guard before
leaving the guardhouse.

123. He will at once report to the commander of the guard
any violation of regulations or any unusual occurrence which
is reported to him by a sentinel, or which comes to his notice
in any other way.

124. Should a sentinel call " The Guard," the corporal will
promptly notify the commander of the guard.

125. Should a sentinel call " Relief," the corporal will at
once proceed to the post of such sentinel, taking with him the
man next for duty on that post. If the sentinel is relieved for
a short time only, the corporal will again post him as soon as
the necessity for his relief ceases.

126. When the countersign is used, the corporal at the post-
ing of tlie relief during whose tour challenging is to begin
gives the countersign to the members of the relief, excepting
those posted at the guardhouse.



270 MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

127. He will wake the corporal whose relief is next on post
iu time for the latter to verify the prisoners, form his relief,
I'.iid post it at the proper hour.

128. Should the guard he turned out, each corporal will call
'':■; own relief, and cause its members to fall in promptly.

129. Tents or hunks in the same vicinity will be designated
ftu- the reliefs so that all the members of each relief may, if
necessary, be found and turned out by the corporal in the least
Liiue and with the least confusion.

130. When challenged by a sentinel while posting his relief,
the corporal commands: 1. Relief, 2, HALT; to the sentinel's
cljallenge he answers " Relief,'' and at the order of the senti-
ik;1 he advances alone to give the countersign, or to be recog-
nized. When the sentinel says, "Advance relief," the corporal
commands : 1. Forward, 2. MARCH.

If to be relieved, the sentinel is then relieved as prescribed.

131. Between retreat and reveille, the corporal of the guard
will challenge all suspicious looking persons or parties he may
observe, lirst halting his patrol or relief, if either be with him.
He will advance them in the same manner that sentinels on
post advance like parties (Pars. 191 to 197), but if the route
of a patrol is on a continuous chain of sentinels, he should not
challenge persons coming near him unless he has reason to
believe that they have eluded the vigilance of sentinels.

132. Between retreat and reveille, whenever so ordered by
an officer entitled to inspect the guard, the corporal will call :
" Turn out the guard," announcing the title of the oflicer, and
then, if not otherwise ordered, he will salute and return to his
post.

133. As a general rule he will advance parties approaching
the guard at night in the same manner that sentinels on post
advance like parties. Thus, the sentinel at the guardhouse
challenges and repeats the answer to the corporal, as pre-
rfcribed hereafter (Par. 200) ; the corporal, advancing at port
•a'ms, sa^.":: "Advance (so-and-so) with the countersign," or
" to be recognized," if there be no countersign used ; the coun-
tersign being correctly given, or the party being duly recog-
■iized, Ihe corporal says : "Advance (so-and-so)," repeating the
.•asv. :i" to the challenge of the sentinel.

:.34. When officers of different rank approach the guard-
ju-use fi'om different directions at the same time, the senior



MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 271

will be advanced first, and will not be made to wait for his
junior.

135. Out of ranks and under arms, tlie corporal salutes with
the rifle salute. He will salute all officers, whether by day or
night. ■

136. The corporal will examine parties halted and detained
by sentinels, and, if he have reason to believe the parties have
no authority to cross sentinel's posts, will conduct them to the
commander of the guard.

137. The corporal of the guard will arrest all suspicious
looking characters prowling about the post or camp, all per-
sons of a disorderly character disturbing the peace, and all
persons taken in the act of committing crime against the Gov-
ernment on a military reservation or post. All persons ar-
rested by corporals of the guard or by sentinels will at once be
conducted to the commander of the guard by the corporal.

Section 7. Musicians of the guard.

138. The musicians of the guard will sound calls as pre-
scribed by the commanding oflicer.

139. Should the guard be turned out for national or regi-
mental colors or standards, uncased, the field music of the
guard will, when the guard present arms, sound, " To the
color" or "To the standard"; or, if for any person entitled
thereto, the march, flourishes, or ruffles, prescribed in para-
graphs 375, 376, and 377, A. R.

Section 8. Orderlies and color sentinels.

140. When so directed by the commanding officer, the officer
who inspects the guard at guard mounting will select from
the members of the new guard an orderly for the commanding
officer and such number of other orderlies and color sentinels
as may be required.

141. For these positions the soldiers will be chosen who are
most correct in the performance of duty and in ^.military bear-
ing, neatest in person and clothing, and whose arms and ac-
couterments are in the best condition. Clothing, arms, ana
equipments must conform to regulations. If there is any
doubt as to the relative qualifications of two or more soldiers,



273 MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

the inspecting officer will cause tliem to fall out at the guard-
house and to form in line in single rank. He will then, by-
testing them in drill regulations, select the most proficient.
The commander of the guard will be notified of the selecttori.

142. When directed by the commander of the guard to fall
out and report an orderly will give his name, company, and
regiment to the sergeant of the guard, and, leaving his rille in
the arm rack in his company quarters, will proceed at once to
the officer to whom he is assigned, reporting : " Sir, Private
, Company , reports as orderly."

143. If the orderly selected be a cavalryman, he will leave
his rifle in the arm rack of his troop quarters and report with
his belt on, but without side arms unless specially otherwise
ordered.

144. Orderlies, while on duty as such, are subject only to
the orders of the commanding officer and of the officers to
A^hom they are oi'dered to report.

145. When an orderly is ordered to carry a message, he will
be careful to deliver it exactly as it was given to him.

146. His tour of duty ends when he is relieved by the
orderly selected from the guard relieving his own.

147. Orderlies are members of the guard, and their name,
company, and regiment are entered on the guard report and
lists of the guard.

148. If a color line is established, sufficient sentinels are
placed on the color line to guard the colors and stacks.

149. Color sentinels are posted only so long as the stacks
are formed. The commander of the guard will divide the
time equally among them.

150. When stacks are broken, the color sentinels may be per-
mitted to return to their respective companies. They are re-
quired to report in person to the commaiider of the guard at
reveille and retreat. They will fall in with the guard, under
arms, at guard mounting.

151. Color sentinels are not placed on the regular reliefs, nor
are their posts numbered. In calling for the corporal of the
guard, they call : " Corporal of the g-uard. Color line."

152. Officers or enlisted men passing the uncased colors will
render the prescribed salute. If the colors are on the stacks,
tile salute will be made on crossing the color line or on pass-
ing the colors.



MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 273

153. A sentinel placed over the colors will not permit them
to be moved except in the presence of an armed escort.
Unless otherwise ordered by the commanding officer, he will
allow ho one to touch them but the color bearer.

He. will not permit any soldier to take arms from the stacks
or to touch them except by order of an officer or noncommis-
sioned officer of the guard.

If any person passing the colors or crossing the color line
fails to salute the colors, the sentinel will caution him to do
so, and if the caution be not heeded he will call the corporal
of the guard and report the facts.

Section 9. Privates of the Guard.

154. Privates are assigned to reliefs by the commander of
the guard, and to posts usually by the corporal of their relief.
They will not change from one relief or post to another during
the same tour of guard duty unless by proper authority.

Section 10. Orders for Sentinels.

155. Orders for sentinels are of two classes : General orders
and special orders. General orders apply to all sentinels.
Special orders relate to particular posts and duties.

156. Sentinels will be required to memorize the following:
• My general orders are :

1. To take cliarg-e of this post and all Government property
in view.

2. To walk my post in a military manner keeping always on
the alert and observing everything that takes place within
sight or hearing.

3. To report all violations of orders I am instructed to en-
force.

4. To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the
guardhouse than my own.

y. To quit my post only when properly relieved.

G. To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentinel who relieves
me all orders from the commanding oficer, officer of the day,
and officers and noncommissioned officers of the guard only.

7. To talk to no one except in line of duty.



274 MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

8. In case of fire or disorder to give the alarm.

9. To allow no one to commit a nnisance on or near my post.

10. In any case not covered by instructions to call the cor-
poral of the guard.

11. To salute all ofiicers, and all colors and standards not
cased.

12. To be especially watchful at night, and, during the time
for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post
and to allow no one to pass without proper authority.

EEGULATIONS EELATING TO THE GENERAL ORDERS FOR SENTIXEI.S.

No. 1 : To take charge of this post and all Government prop-
erty in view.

157. All persons, of whatever rank in the service, are re-
quired to observe respect toward sentinels and members of the
guard when such are in the performance of their duties.

158. A sentinel will at once report to the corporal of the
guard every unusual or suspicious occurrence noted.

159. He will arrest suspicious persons prowling about the
post or camp at any time, all parties to a disorder occurring
on or near his post, and all, except authorized persons, who
attempt to enter the camp at night, and will turn over to the
corporal of the guard all persons arrested.

160. The number, limits, and extent of his post will in-
variably constitute part of the special orders of a sentinel on
post. The limits of his post should be so defined as to include
every place to which he is required to go in the performance
of his duties.

^o. 2 : To walk my post in a military manner, keeping always
on the alert and observing everything that takes place
within sight or hearing.

161. A sentinel is not required to halt and change the posi-
tion of his rille on arriving at the end of his post, nor to
execute to the rear, march, precisely as prescribed in the drill
regulations, but faces about while walking in the manner most
convenient to him and at any part of his post as may be best
suited to the proper performance of his duties. He carries his



MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 275

rifle on either shoulder, and in wet or severe weather, when
not in a sentry box, may carry it at a secure.

162. Sentinels wlien in sentry boxes stand at ease. Sentry
boxes will be used in wet weather only, or at other times
when specially authorized by the commanding ofljcer.

163. In very hot weather, sentinels may be authorized to
stand at ease on their posts, provided they can effectively dis-
charge tlieir duties in this position ; but they will take advan-
tage of this privilege only on the express authority -of the
officer of the day or the commander of the guard.

164. A mounted sentinel may dismount occasionally and lead
the horse, but will not relax his vigilance.

No. 3 : To report all violations of orders I am instructed to

enforce.

165. A sentinel will ordinarily report a violation of orders
when he is inspected or relieved, but if the case be urgent, he
will call the corporal oC the guard, and also, if necessary, will
arrest the offender.

No. 4 : To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the
guardhouse than my own.

166. To call the corporal of the guard for any purpose other
than relief, fire, or disorder (Pars. 167 and 173), a sentinel will
of his post. In no case will any sentinel call, " Never mind
of his post. In no case will any sentinel call, " Never mind
the corporal"; nor will the corporal heed such call if given.

No. 5: To quit my post only when properly relieved.

167. If relief becomes necessary, by reason of sickness or
other ca«use, a sentinel will call, " Corporal of the guard, No.
( ), Relief," giving the number of his post.

168. Whenever a sentinel is to be relieved, he will halt, and
with arms at a right shoulder, will face toward the relief,
when it is 30 paces from him. He will come to a port arms
with the new sentinel, and in a lov/ tone will transmit to hin?

. all tbe special orders relating to the post and any other infor
mation which will assist him to better perform h?s duties.



276 MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

No, 6 : To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentinel who re-
lieves me, all orders from the commanding' officer, officer of
the day, and officers and noncommissioned officers of the
guard only.

169. During his tour of duty a soldier is subject to the
orders of the commanding officer, officer of the day, and officers
and noncommissioned officers of the guard only ; but any officer
is competent to investigate apparent violations of regulations
by members of the guard.

170. A sentinel will quit his piece on an explicit order from
any person from whom he lawfully receives orders while on
post ; under no circumstances will he yield it to any other per-
son. Unless necessity therefor exists, no person will require
a sentinel to quit his piece, even to allow it to be inspected.

171. A sentinel will not divulge the countersign (Pars. 209
to 217) to anyone except the sentinel who relieves him, or to
a person from whom he properly receives orders, on such per-
son's verbal order given personally. Privates of the guard
will not use the countersign except in the performance of
their duties while posted as sentinels.

No. 7 : To talk to no one except in line of duty.

172. When calling for any purpose, challenging, or holding
communication with any person a dismounted sentinel armed
with a rifle or saber will take the position of port arms or
saber. At night a dismounted sentinel armed with a pistol
takes the position of raised pistol in challenging or holding
communication. A mounted sentinel does not ordinarily draw
his weapon in the daytime when challenging or holding con-
versation ; but if drawn he holds it at advance rifle, raise pis-
tol, or port saber, according as he is armed with a rifle, pistol,
or saber. At night in challenging and hohling conrersation
his weapon is drawui and held as just prescribed, depending on
wdiether he is armed with a rifle, pistol, or saber.

No. 8 : In case of fire or disorder to give the alarm.

173. In case of fire, a sentinel will call, "Fire, No. ( ),"

adding the number of his post ; if possible, he will extinguish



MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 277

the fire himself. In case of disorder he will call, " The Guard,

No. ( )," adding the number of his post. If the danger be

great, he will in either case discharge his piece before calling.

No. 11 : To salute all officers and all colors and standards not

cased.

174. When not engaged in the performance of a specific duty,
the proper execution of which would prevent it, a member of
the guard will salute all officers who pass him. This rule
applies at all hours of the day or night, except in the case of
mounted sentinels armed with a rifle or pistol, or dismounted
sentinels armed with a pistol, after challenging. (See par.
181.)

175. Sentinels will salute as follows: A dismounted sentinel
armed with a rifle or saber salutes by presenting arms; if
otherwise armed, he salutes with the right hand.

A mounted sentinel, if armed with a saber and the saber be
drawn, salutes by presenting saber ; otherwise he salutes in all
cases with the right hand.

176. To salute, a dismounted sentinel, with piece at a right
shoulder or saber at a carry, halts and faces toward the per-
son to be saluted when the latter arrives within 30 paces.

The limit within which individuals and insignia of rank can
be readily recognized is assumed to be about 30 paces, and
therefore at this distance cognizance is taken of the person
or party to be saluted.

177. The salute is rendered at six paces ; if the person to be
saluted does not arrive within that distance, then when he is
nearest.

178. A sentinel in a sentry box, armed with a rifle, stands
at attention in the doorway on the approach of a person or
party entitled to salute, and salutes by presenting arms ac-
cording to the foregoing rules.

If armed with a saber, he stands at a carry and salutes as
before.

179. A mounted sentinel on a regular post, halts, faces, and
salutes in accordance with the foregoing rules. If doing
patrol duty, he salutes, but does not halt unless spoken to.

180. Sentinels salute, in accordance with the foregoing rules,
all persons and parties entitled to compliments from the



278 MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS.

guards (Pars. 224, 227, and 228) ; officers of the Army, Navy,
and Marine Corps ; military and naval officers of foreign
powers; officers of volunteers and militia officers when in
uniform.

181. A sentinel salutes as just prescribed when an officer
comes on his post ; if the officer holds communication with the
sentinel, the sentinel again salutes when the officer leaves him.

During the hours when challenging is prescribed, the first
salute is given as soon as the officer has been duly recognized
and advanced. A mounted sentinel armed with a rifle or pistol,
or a dismounted sentinel armed with a pistol, does not salute
after challenging.

He stands at advance rifle or raise pistol until the officer
passes.

182. In case of the approach of an armed party of the guard,
the sentinel will halt when it is about 30 paces from him,
facing toward the party with his piece at the right shoulder.
If not himself relieved, he will, as the party passes, place him-
self so that the party will pass in front of him ; he resumes
walking his post when the party has reached six paces beyond
him.

183. An officer is entitled to the compliments prescribed,
whether in uniform or not.

184. A sentinel in communication with an officer will not
interrupt the conversation to salute. In the case of seniors
the officer will salute, whereupon the sentinel will salute.

185. When the flag is being lowered at retreat, a sentinel on
post and in view of the flag will face the flag, and, at the first
note of the Star-Spangled Banner or to the color will come to
a present arms. x\t the sounding of the last note he will
resume walking his post.

No. 12 : To be especially watchful at night and during the time
for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post,
and to allow no one to pass without proper authority.

186. During challenging hours, if a sentinel sees any person
or party on or near his post, he will advance rapidly along his
post toward such person or party and when within about 30
yards will challenge sharply, "Halt, who is there?" He will



MANUAL FOR NONCOMMISSIONED OFFICERS. 279

place himself in the best possible position to receive or, if
necessary, to arrest the person or party. .

187. In case a mounted party be challenged, the sentinel ^Yill
call, "Halt, Dismount. Who is there? "

188. The sentinel will permit only one of any party to ap-
proach him for the purpose of giving the countersign (Pars.
209 to 217), or, if no countersign be used, of being duly recog-
nized. When this is done the whole party is 'advanced, i. 8.,
allowed to pass.

189. In all cases the sentinel must satisfy himself beyond a
reasonable doubt that the parties are what they represent
themselves to be and have a right to pass. If he is not satis-
fied, he must cause them to stand and call the corporal of the
guard. So, likewise, if he have no authority to pass persons
with the countersign, or when the party has not the counter-
sign, or gives an incorrect one.

190. A sentinel will not permit any person to approach so
close as to prevent the proper use of his own weapon before
recognizing the person or receiving the countersign.

191. When two or more persons approach in one party, the
sentinel, on receiving an answer that indicates that some one
in the party has the countersign, will say, "Advance one with
the countersign," and if the countersign is given correctly,
will then say, "Advance (so-and-so)," repeating the answer to
his challenge. Thus if the answer be " Relief (friend with



Online LibraryUnited States. War DeptManual for noncommissioned officers and privates of cavalry of the Army of the United States. 1917. To be also used by engineer companies (mounted) for cavalry instruction and training → online text (page 22 of 30)