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and religious lines, and to arouse in him a love for the subject
and a habit of broad and discriminate reading.



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SUB-COLLBGIATB DBPARTMBNT «1

The work of the first year will consist of a surrey of the
deyelopment and characteristics of the Greek and Roman
dTillzations. A text such as Wolfson's or West's will be sup-
plemented by collateral reading and a notebook.

The work of the second year includes mediaeval and mod-
em history. The aim is to give the student an idea of the
essential unity of history and the leading facts in the political
development of races and nationa Adams's European History
is used supplemented by the reading of references contained
therein.

Hinsdale's American Government is the text-book in
civic& The historical development of the subject is made
prominent while practical problems, such as taxation and mu-
nicipal government, are made the subjects of special investi-
gation and study.

Coman and Kendall's or Lamed's History of England Is
used as the text-book in the fourth year.

LflTIH, GREEK, FRENGtl, SPflNlStt AND OERMflN

For an outline of the courses in Latin and Greek see page
22, under requirements for admission.

For an outline of the courses in BYench, Spanish and Ger-
man see pages 31 and 82.

MECnflNIG ARTS

This work consists of both drawing and shop work, be-
tween which subjects the student's time is about equally
divided. The course covers three years and is designed to fur-
nish a thorough elementary knowledge of Manual lYaining as
taught in the sub-colleglate schools of the country.

FIRST TEAR. Drawing—Freehand sketching in perspec-
tive and orthographic projection. Reinhart's lettering, free-
hand working drawings.

Shopwork— '*Sloyd" including wood-carving, care and use
of wood-working tools.

SiECOND TEAR. Drawing— Mechanical drawing, geometri-
cal problems, first seventeen problems in Church's descriptive
geometry.

Shipwork— l<'orging, joinery, wood-turning.

DOMESTIC SGIENGE

The course in domestic science is arranged to give instruc-
tion in the science and art of home economics, and to raise
home making to a higher plane. In includes all branches of
home science, hygiene, chemistry of cooking and cleaning,



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62 UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

preparation of all food stuflB, both fancy and elementary, nurs-
ing and food for the sick, marketing, management of serrants.
Two courses are offered in sewing. The first year includes
fancy needle work, and the second year drafting, cutting and
dressmaking. Social duties and customs of society are consid-
ered with particular care. The students have access in the
domestic science library to all the best authorities.

BOOKKEEPINOp STENOORflPny AND TYPEWRITINO

Bookkeeping is taught by the modem budget system. The
work is Indiyidual and each student may progress as fast as
his time and ability permit. The course is thorough in all the
details of office practice. The course includes instruction in
commercial law. A complete course in stenography is offered,
the Pitman system being used. The department is equipped
with Remington typewriters.

Special students in bookkeeping and stenography will not
be received. All students taking these courses must show
proficiency in English and English composition, represented
by the ESnglish work of the year of the course preceding the
year in which the elective is offered.

PflRLlflMEHTflRY PRACTICE AND DEBflTB

The two higher classes in the sub-collegiate department
devote one period of each week to work in parliamentary prac-
tice and debate. The classes are organized under a regular
constitution and by-laws. Instruction is given in parliamen-
tary law, Roberts's Rules or Order being used as a text-book.
The members are required to Introduce resolutions and pre-
pare debates upon them. They are also given practice in
performing the duties of secretary and in presiding in the
meetings.

SCIENCE

It is the object of the courses in science to initiate the stu-
dent into the processes and methods used in laboratory work;
to teach close observation, careful manipulation and logical
deduction; to acquaint the student with the fundamental facts
of the various branches of science and to give full practice in
the use of good English in describing various observations
and experiments. To insure better results in the notebooks,
they will all be passed upon by one of the instructors in
English.

PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. This course, combining the
laboratory method with the text-book, aims to give the pupils
training in exact observation of familiar phenomena, like



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eUB-COLiLEGIATE DSPARTMENT 63

distance, weight, pressure of liquids and gases, temperatures,
winds, clouds and the habits of plants and animals. The
natural forces producing erosion, formation of soils and rocks,
the processes of nature as seen in seed germination and plant
growth (with demonstrations with the microscope) will be dis-
cussed, with frequent experiments and field excursions.

CHESMISTRT. A year's work with the text and in the
laboratory.

PHYSICS. A thorough course consisting of three recita-
tion periods and four laboratory periods per week, carried on
along the lines laid down for the senior year in secondary
schools.

PHTSIOLOGT. This course aims to combine careful
laboratory instruction, with application of the knowledge to
practical personal hygiene. This work will be co-ordinated
with that of the department of Physical Culture. For part of
the instructions the young men and women will meet in
separate sections.

MIlTflfiMllTIGS

In algebra special attention is given to the transition from
arithmetic to algebra, to the fundamental operations and
especially to factoring. The course includes as much as is
found in any good text-book of algebra through quadratic
equations.

Plane geometry occupies one year. This is so taught as to
develop orderly habits of thinking and of investigation. To
that end much original work is required, including practical
problems involving the application of the principles learned.

ENOLISn

The Ehiglish of the sub-collegiate course is based upon
what are known as the entrance requirements of New Bngland
colleges. The work is in general divided into three parts:
classics, studied in class, composition and grammar work
done partly in class and part outside, and supplementary read-
ing done largely outside the class-room. All these parts of
the work may be carried on at the same time, as the circum-
stances of the class seem to require, the classics and supple*
mentary reading forming the basis of a large part of the work
in grammar and composition. Throughout the course,
however, a primary aim is to develop the student's individual
power of expressing himself in words. The time allotted to
these three phases of English varies from year to year, in-
creasing attention being paid to the appreciative and critical
fftculty as the course advances. In the fourth year a brief
outline history of English and American literature occupies
about one-third of the year's work in English.



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64 UNIVERSITT OF ARIZONA

The four years' Bub-coUegiate Bngllsh is conducted
under the following general outline. Five hours each week are
given to ESngllsh throughout the course.

FIRST YEAR

CLASSICS. Ivanhoe, Lady of the Lake, Silas Mamer or
Palmer's Odyssey. These are for general reading, though
discussed in class, and made the basis of written tests.

COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR. Text-books, Scott L
Denney, Elementary Composition and a grammar to be chosen
by the teacher, both to be used for two years. This work may
be carried on Uirough some part of each recitation period, with
the classics above as a basis so far as is desirable. The aim
is to make the grammar organic but not mechanical.

SUPPLEMENTARY READING. Gayley's Classic Myths,
Old Mortality, Rob Roy, Tales of a Wayside Inn, \vaverly. Last
of the Mohicans, Tom Brown at Rugby, Marmion. These
selections may be used in class and worked upon there, or
read at home as occasion requires.

SECOND YEAR

CLASSICS. Vision of Sir Launfal, Ancient Mariner,
Idylls of the King, studied as in first year.

COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR. As in first year with
attention to figures of speech, reproducing the work of classic
authors, elementary etymology, exercises in exposition, nar-
ration and description.

SUPPLEMENTARY READING. Deserted Village, Loma
Doone, selections from Burroughs.

TfflRD YEAR

CLASSICS. (a) Julius Caesar, Merchant of Venice.
Princess, Sir Roger de Coverley, Poems of Bums, Carlyle*s
Essay on Bums. These are for general reaamg as in first and
second years. (b) Macaulay's Essay on Milton, Milton's
TAllegro, II Penseroso, Comus, Lycidas. These are for care-
ful study, attention being given to the author and his times,
the circumstances surrounding each composition, the refer-
ences and allusions, the text, the style and the personality ot
the author, the intellectual and artistic features of each pro-
duction, and such other proDlems as arise in a thorough
consideration of a piece of literature.

COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR. Text-book, Scott and
Denney's Composition-Rhetoric. Special attention given to
elementary argumentation and to exposition. Grammar in
review as occasion requires.



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SUB-COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT 66

SUPPLBMBNTARY RBADING. Seeame and Lill6a»
Backlog Studies, Treasure Island, Kidnapped.

FOURTH TEAR

CLASSICS. Bnrke'a Speech on Conciliation, Maoanlay's
ESssay on Addison, MacbetlL These are all for thorough study
as under (b) of previous year.

COMPOSITION AND GRAMMAR. Bxereises in narra-
tion and description for flexibility and ease of expression and
general preparation for entrance requirement "b" on page
23 of this Register.

HISTORY OP BNGU8H LITBRATURB. From the
earliest times, with text-book as guide, with a review in
chronological order of the classics studied during the four
years of the course, to prepare for examination in entrance
requirement "a" on page 22 of this Register. Special attention
is paid to Keats, Shelley, Tennyson and other representative
poets of the nineteenth century.

6UPPLBMBNTARY READING. Our Old Home, Making
of an American, Newcomes, Oliver Twist, American Orations
and Addresses.



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MIUTARY ORGANIZATION 1903-04

UNIVERSITY OP ARIZONA CADET BATTALION

National Guard of Arizona

Commandant of Cadets

Captain Mason M. Maxon, U. S. A.; Major N. G. A.

STAFF

Adjutant First Lieutenant Roy B. Kilgore

Quartermaster Second Lieutenant Francis D. Crable

Unassigned Captain Bard L. Cosgrove

Sergeant Major Tgnacio S. Bonillaa

COMPANY A

Captain Roy W. Moore

First Lieutenant J. Wesley Gebb

Second Lieutenant W. Stanley Gebb

First Sergeant Albert A. Johns

Sergeant John H. Zellweger

Sergeant Albert R. Buehman

Corporal W. James Pew

Corporal W. Scott Oflbom

COMPANY B

Captain Oliyer Scow

First Lieutenant Fred H. Bernard

Second Lieutenant Sheldon L. IJams

First Sergeant Owen F. Jones

Sergeant J. Elmer Johnson

Corporal Wm. F. Drew

Corporal Hugh M. Wolflin

Corporal George C. Marsh

BAND

Chief Musician Frank C. Kelton

Drum Major Charles E. Wooddell

Corporal Burrell R. Hatcher

Corporal Manuel Montijo, Jr.

Private P. E. Baffert

Private Roy L. Cornell



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MILITARY ORGANIZATION 67

PrlYate Shnmet F. Ford

Private J. A. Gkunble

Private W. A. Groasetta

Private L. M. HoUiday

Private C. L. Hardy

Private L#. F. HaMard

Private B. G. Suarez

Private C. B. Thomae

Private A. A. Trippel



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ALUMNI ASSCX3ATION



The Alumni Association of the University of Arizona was
organized on the second day of June, 1897.

The object of this society as expressed in its constitution
is: "To promote the interests of the Uniyersity, to secure
unity among its graduates and to foster an attachment to our
Alma Mater."

Oonceming the last two clauses of this declaration it may
be said that the organization is carrying out their meaning in
a manner which leaves little if anything to be desired. There
Is no doubt regarding the loyalty of the graduates to the
University of Arizona and no question of their unanimous de-
sire for the prosperity of the institution.

The first clause of the above declaration, however, deals
with a matter which in a sense admits of more growth than
those just mentioned, and the members of the association real-
ize that there is room for further progress in the accomplish-
ment of this purpose.

In the past the alumni organization has been small in
numbers and efforts to "promote the interests of the Univer-
sity" have necessarily been somewhat feeble. As, however,
the membership is now fairly large and will be considerably
augmented in 1903 it is the conviction of the alumni that the
time has come for more clearly defined and decisive work in
behalf of our Alma Mater.

So far the activity of the society has been shown in two
ways: First by assuming charge of the work of securing
suitably framed photographs of the members of the graduat-
ing classes, from year to year, and presenting these to the
University for preservation on its walls, thus forming a pic-
torial record of the work of the institution. Secondly, by
giving an annual banquet at Commencement to the graduates
and members of the faculty, thereby creating a fraternal feel-
ing between the old and new members of the association and
also keeping the instructors and graduates in touch with each
other from year to year. However commendable and import-
ant these enterprises may be it is the belief of the society that
now with numerous members scattered throughout Arizona
actively engaged in the industries, arts and sciences the time
has come to take up additional work.

The members of the association realize that there are yet
many people in the Territory who are not fully aware of the
educational opportunities afforded by the University. Some
of these are sending their children to other States to rficeivo
an education which might be obtained equally well In this
Territory. It should be realized that the more the people



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ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 00

patronize their own institution the better will become the
conrsee which it can offer. In one senee the degree of devel-
opment of the University depends only on the measure of
support given to it by the citizens of the Territory.

Another feature which is commended to the careful con-
sideration of our wealthy citizens is that the University of
Arizona has not one cent of endowment. Through the gener-
osity of one of the largest mining companies in Arizona the
institution has received two substantial gifts of money to aid
in the erection and furnishing of buildings, but other than
this nothing has been received from private individuals.
Institutions to the east and west of us have endowments of
thousands of dollars; why should not the University of Ari-
zona be endowed also?

In pursuance of the foregoing lines of thought it will be
the aim of the alumni association to endeavor to create a
deeper feeling of Interest and pride in the University of Ari-
zona among the people of the Territory.

ALUMNI OF UNIVERSITY OF ARlZONfl
1896

Charles Oma Rouse, B. S., Cashier Southern Pacific Rail-
road Company, Tucson, Arizona.

Mercedes Anna Shibell, B. S., (Mrs. A. J. Qould), Tucson,
Arizona.

Mary Flint Walker, B. S., (Mrs. Pearl Adams), Benson,
Arizona.

1897

Edward Marshall Boggs, C. E., (nunc pro tunc) Chief En-
gineer Ooakland Electric Railways, Oakland, Cal.

Clara Chramond Fish, B. S., Teacher, Flagstaff, Arizona.

(3eorge OJeda Hilzinger, B. S., Teller In Bank, El Paso,
Texas.

Mark Walker, B. S., Metallurgist, Tombstone, Arizona.

1898

Hattie Ferrin, B. S., Instructor in University of Arizona,
Tucson, Arizona.

Granville Malcolm X^^illett, B. S., Draughtsman in Surveyor
General's Office, Phoenix, Arizona.

Minnie Watts, B. S., (Mrs. W. B. Smith), AlUville, Cal.

•John Desha Young, B. 8.

1899
Robert L. Morton, B. S., Assayer, Yuma, Arizona.
* Died April 8, 1899.



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70 UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

1900

Ida Clarissa Flood, B. S., (Mrs. O. Dodge) Oakland, Cal.

Samuel Pressly McCrea, B. S., A. B., Principal of High
School, Mountain View, California.

Charles Pierce Richmond, B. S., Cyanide Manager, San
Salvador, Central America.

Florence Russel Welles, B. S., (Mrs. Wm. Angus), Tucson,
Arizona.

1901

Rudolph Castenada, B. S.. Surveyor, Benson, Arizona.

Clara Ferrin, B. S., Teacher, Tucson, Arizona.

George Millard Parker, B. S., Denver, Colo.

David Hull Holmes, B. S., (nunc pro tunc) Professor of
Mechanic Arts and Drawing, University of Arizona, Tucson,
Arizona.

1902

Andrew Gilbert Aiken, A. B., B. S., Surveyor, Canton, New
York.

Moses Blumenkranz, B. S., Asst. Supt Shannon Copp^i
Company, Metcalf, iirizona.

Ruth Brown, Ph. B., Teacher, Tucson, Arizona.

Felix Grundy Haynes, B. S., Casa Grande, Arizona.

Rosa Belle Barrott, Ph. B., Teacher, Roseburg, Oregon.

Philip Matthew Reilly, B. S., Assay er. La Cananea, Sonora,
Mexico.

Bertram L. Smith, B. S., Surveyor and Assayer, Mayer,
Arizona.

Bessie Smith, Ph. B., Teacher, Tucson, Arizona.

Walter James Wakefield, Assayer, Tombstone, Arizona.

1903

Richard Lamar Drane, B. S., Draughtsman, Tucson,
Arizona.

George Mark Evans, LL. B., Ph. B., Instructor in Univer-
sity of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

Leslie Alexander Gillett, B. S. (Mining), Draughtsman, in
Surveyor General's Office, Phoenix, Arizona.

Georgia Ann Holmesley, Ph. B., Tempe, Arizona.

Edward Horton Jones, B. S., Assayer, Magdalena, Sonora,
Mexico.

John Williard Prout, Jr., B. S., Instructor In University of
Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

Thomas Edward Steele, B. S. Assayer, Cananea, Sonora.
Mexico.



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ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 71

DEORU& G0NFeRRbDII90»

DOCTOR OP LAWS

Hon. William Herring.

BfASTBR OF ARTS

John William Oorby, A. B.
Benjamin Franklin Stacey, A. B., B. D.

BACHELOR OF PHILOSOPHY

XJeorge Mark Evans, LL. B.
(Georgia Ann Holmesley.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE

Richard Lamar Drane.
Edward Horton Jones.
John Williard Prout, Jr.
Thomas Edward Steele.

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN MINING

Leslie Alexander Gillett.



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REGISTER OF STUDENTS-
1903-04.

POST GRADUATE STUDENTS.

Evans, George Mark, (Ph. B. University of Arizona) Mathematics,
History and Science Tucson.

Ferrin, Clara, (B. S. University of Arizona) History Tucson.

Ferrin, Hattie, (B. S. University of Arizona) French and

German... Tucson.

Flood, Ida Clarissa, (B. S. University of Arizona) History, Tucson.

Prout, Jr., John Williard (B. S. University of Arizona) Mathematics
and Chemistry Denver, Colo.

SENIORS— 4.

Alexander, William Bumham __ Scituate, Mass.

HoUinfirshead, Elbert John, Tucson.

Kelton, Frank Caleb, St. Albans, Vt.

Prout, Estella Markham, _._ Denver, Colo.

JUNIORS— 7.

Ball, Charles Leonard, Santa Monica, Cal.

Ganz, Sylvan Cleveland, Phoenix.

Gebb, John Wesley, Jerome.

Holman, James Pattison, Seattle, Wash.

Norway, Ora Elinor, Tucson.

Reid, Ida Christina, Tucson.

Rockwell, Guy Lionel, Compton, Cal.

SOPHOMORES— 18.

Alexander, Charles, Lee's Summit, Mo.

Bernard, Fred Horton, Tucson.

Brostrom, William Walter Tucson.

Chapin, Theodore, Tucson.

Colton, Georgiana, Safford.

Day, Courtland Francis, Duncan.

Jacobson, Robert Clarke, Tucson,

Kilffore, Roy Bautley, Williams*

Maclntyre, John Malcolm, Phoenix.



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REGISTER OF STUDENTS 73

Marshall, Thomas K., Tucson.

Moore, Bert, - Santa Barbara, Cal.

Moore, KirkeTonner, Tucson.

Moore, Nino, Tucson.

Moore, Roy Webb, Tucson.

Rosenberg, Leo M., Phoenix.

Thomber, Harriet B., Tucson.

Whipple, Willizun Dominicus ._ Clifton.

Wooddell, Minnie Louise, Tucson.

FRESHMEN— 27

Adams, Charles Henry, Williams.

Anderegg, Charles, Tucson.

Babcock, Frances Myra, Tucson.

Bonillas, Ygnacio Safford, Nogales, Mexico.

Brown, Harriet Estella Tucson.

Brown, Thomas Bruen Los Angeles, Cal.

Cornell, Roy LeQrande Corona, Cal.

Crable, Francis Drake _ Tombstone.

Fish, Florence May, Tucson.

Gardenier, Lela, Oneonta, N. Y.

Gebb, William Stanley Jerome.

Ijams, Sheldon Safford.

Marsh, George Claire, Phoenix.

Miller Clarence Ethelbert,. Lincoln, 111.

Morfoot, Charles Roy, Bisbee.

Nelson, Ada M., Chicago, 111.

Osbom. Winfield Scott, Phoenix.

Purcell. Weeda Ina, Tucson.

Redd, Paul Chester, Tucson.

Samuels, Kathryn, Tucson.

Schmid, Arnold, Bisbee.

Schoenle, Robert Wolfgang, ._ Seattle, Wash.

Scow, Oliver, DosCabezos.

White, Charles, -.DosCabezos.

Wolflin, Hugh Maupin, Tucson,

Willson, Martha Edna, Newark, 0.

Zellweger, Elsie Marie, Tucson.



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74 UNIVBR8ITY OF ARIZONA

SUB-COLLEGIATE-FOURTH-7

Bernard, Allan Chouteau, Tucson.

Bradford, Hubert, Aberdeen, 0.

-Cole, Leah Margaret, Tucson.

Fitch, Constance, _ Tucson.

Jones, Ernest, Tucson.

Pickett, Ernest Charles, Napa, Cal.

Wooddell, Charles Edward, Tucson.

SUB-COLLEGIATE— THIRD— 27

Bernard, Nonie C, Tucson.

Brown, Clara Agnes, ..Tucspn.

Brown, John Stephenson, Tucson.

Buehman, Albert Rex, Tucson.

Cole, RenaAnne, _ Tucson.

Cully, Edith E., Tucson.

Davis, Hattie Louise, Fairbanks.

Drew, William P., Mesa.

Francis, Mae A., _ Tucson.

Gamble, James Albert, Solomonville.

Gamble, William Edward, Solomonville.

Hatcher, Burrell R., Douglas.

Holladay, Elsie Roxanne, Tucson.

Johnson, Joel Elmer, Mesa.

Jones, Owen Frank, Buckeye.

Kane, Mae Dolores, Tucson.

Mclnemay, Alice Georgia, Tucson.

Marsh, Elinor K., Norwich, N. Y.

Maxon, Kimball W., Waukesha. Ws.

O'Connell, Thomas S., San Francisco, Cal.

Pease, lone Gertrude, Tucson.

Pew, William James, Mesa.

Scholefield. Walter Tucson.

Stewart, Jesse H., Mesa.

Thomas, Charles Emerson, Tucson.

Woods, Mary Etta, Tucson.

Zellweger, John H., Tucson.



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BEQISTER OF STUDENTS 76

SUB-COLLEGIATE-SECOND~54

Angius, Dan Bisbta.

Bemis» Francis George, Sanger. Cal.

Brown, Charles Owen, Tucson.

Carpenter, Leslie L. Tucson.

Childs, Ruby C, Chicago. 111.

Doan, Fletcher M., Tucson.

Dunn, Edward, San Francisco, Cal.

Erb, Amy Myrtle, Yorktown, Tex.

Evans, EvalynMayme Tucson.

Fike, Lyman W., _ Naco.

Qrosetta, Warren Arthur, Tucson.

Guerry, Horace Dixon, Tucson.

Halderman, Ada E., Dragoon.

Harney, Leah Maude, Butte, Montana.

Hazzard, Lynne Franklin, Tucson.

Hoeffer, PhDipH., Hermosillo, Mex.

Johns, Albert Arthur, Prescott.

Lewis, Otis David, Lothrop, Mont.

Macomb, Philip Livingston, Ft Huachuca.

Martin, Andrew P., Tucson.

Mansfeld, Monte, Tucson.

Moore, Sylvester Archie Congress.

Redd, WaWron Russell, Tucson.

Reed, Sheldon Alanson, Tucson.

Rodgers, Pauline, Tucson.

Samuels, Agnes H., Tucson.

ScholeTield, Helen Mar, Tucson.

Steinfeld, Harold D., Tucson.

Suarez, Benito Guadalupe, Solomonville.

Tonella, Carlos, Hermosillo, Mex.

Trippell, Alfred Alexander, Tucson.

Whalley, Mable Elizabeth, Tucson.

Winchestet, Wilbur Theodore, Tucson.

Wright. Wniiam E., Tucson.

SUB-COLLEQI ATE-FIRST— 6 1

Adams, Lee David Dragoon.

Akms, Susie, Mesa.



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76 UNIVBRSITT OP ARIZONA

Angius. John, Bisbee.

Baffert, Peter E., Tucson.

Bell, Sylvester D., Tucson.

Bernard, Edwin Price, Tucson.

Cassiday, Clifford Harry, Tucson.

Cole, Myrtle Elsie, Tucson.

Coleman, Mabel May Tucson.

Contraman, Robert William, Tucson.

Dannemiller, Raymond Charles McCabe.

Detloff, Albert John, Bisbee.

Donnelly, Albert Francis Tucson.

Drachman, Myrtle Augustine, Tucson.

Duffy, Mary Margaret, Tucson.

Elliott, Irene Anabelle Tucson.

Estabrook, Ethylind M., Tucson.

Estes, Lee, VTillcox.

Fike, Homer R, Naco.

Ford, Emmet T., Tucson.

Francis, Daisy E., Tucson.

Qast, William H., Tucson.

Goldtree, Estella Tucson.

Corby, Eva, Marietta, 0.

Gregory, Minnie Hortense, Tucson.

Hardy, Charles Lyttle, Tucson.

Harmon, Ernest Frank, Washington.

Hoeffer, Albert H., Hermosillo, Mex.

Holliday, Leonidas Maurice, Tucson.

Hoyt, Joseph Clyde, Jerome.

Katzenstein, Albert Samuel, Tucson.

Leslie, Beppie Lee, Tucson.

McKay, William, Cochise.

McLean, John William, Metcalf.

Macomb, Alexander, Ft Huachuca.

Millar, Leslie Creighton, _ Tucson.

Montijo Jr., Manuel, - Tucson.

Ochoa, Edna, Tucson.

Odermatt, Tessie A., Tucson.

Palafox, Leopoldo, Matape, Mex.

Piatt. Maude, Safford.

Potter, Delbert Dorsey Clifton.



Online LibraryUniversity of ArizonaAnnouncement for the academic year → online text (page 11 of 53)