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Announcement for the academic year online

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rooms. The draughting room accommodates thirty-six students.

The power room contains two engines, a dynamo, a blower
and an exhauster.

The wood-working shop is equipped with a full assortment
of hand tools, four wood-turning lathes, a universal wood-
worker, a dimension sawing machine and other modem wood-
working appliances.

The forge room contains twenty-four down draught forges,
twenty-four anvils, a blacksmith drill-press and all necessary
small tools.

The machine shop contains three 14- Inch engine lathes, one
24- inch engine lathe, one 16-inch shaper, one 24-inch planer, one
24-inch drill, one unlv^^al milling machine, one grinding ma-
chine, several smaller machines, vises and a complete outfit of
small tools.

The entire building is well lighted and ventilated and the
draughting room is heated by steam.

MILITARY

Room O is used as an armory. It is fitted with the neces-
sary gun racks and accessories. The equipment includes 160
old style Springfield rifles, 100 Springfleld cadet rifles with com-
plete accoutrements, eight swords and belts, one 8-inch muzzle-
loading rifle with carriage and complete equipment, also neces-
sary musical Instruments and signal flags.



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GENERAL INEOR/AATION

The departments and courses of study of the University are
arranired as follows:
i. COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC ARTS.

A literary course leadlnfir to the degree of Bachelor of
Philosophy.

A scientific course leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science.

An engineering course leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science in Engineering.

An agricultural course leading to the degree of Bachelor of
Science In Agriculture.

A chemistry course leading to the degree of Bachelor of

Science in Chemistry.

II. SCHOOL OF MINES.

A mining engineering course leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Science in Mining.

A two years' course in mineralogy and assaying.

A bureau of mines and assaying,
in. AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION.
IV. SUB-COLLEGIATE DEPARTMENT.

BTnglish, classical and scientific courses.

Manual training and domestic science courses.

Commercial course.



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GBNBRAL INFORMATION 17

COLLEGE or AGRICULTURE AND MECHANIC
ARTS: SCHOOL Or MINES

PACULTY

FRANK TAIiE ADAMS, A. M.»

President;

Professor of History and Pedagogy.

WIUaIAM PHIPPS BLAKE, Ph. B., A. M.,
Professor of Qeology, Metallurgy and Mining; Director School

of Mines.

HOWARD JUDSON HAL»L» A. M.,
Professor of English.

SHERMAN MBLrVILLB WOODWARD, M. S.. A. M.,
Professor of Mathematics and Mechanics.

FRANK NELSON GUILD. B. S.,
Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy.

DAVID HULL HOLMES. B. S.,
Professor of Mechanic Arts and Drawing.

GEORGE EDSON PHILIP SMITH. B. S., C. B..
Professor of Physics and Engineering.

JOHN JAMES THORN6ER. A. M..
Professor of Biology.

JOHN MERCER PATTON, A. M.,

Assistant Professor of Modem Languages; Acting Professor of

Military Science and Tactics.

WILLIAM W. SKINNER, M. S.,
Instructor in Photography.

JOHN WILLIAM GORBT, A. B.,
Instructor in Public Speaking.

MARION CUMMINGS STANLEY. A. B.,
Instructor in Latin.

ALICE OLIVIA BUTTERFIELD. A. B..
Instructor in History.



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COLLEGE or AGRICULTURE AND
MECHANIC ARTS

The courses offered in the College of Afirriculture and the
Mechanic Arts provide a liberal traininsr for younfir men and
women along literary and scientific lineSp and for young men
along engineering, mechanical and agricultural lines. Qreat
latitude of election is given in the literary and scientific courses,
but the course in engineering is more rigid in its requirements.
Full details of the various courses follow. In all the courses
the aim is to combine the practical with the theoretical in in-
struction. The needs of our young and growing commonwealth
are kept in mind, and in all courses some instruction is pro-
vided which has for its aim the making of good citizens.

ARIZONA SCHOOL or MINES

The School of Mines is designed for the education and train-
ing of young men in the arts and sciences directly involved in
the industries of mining and metallurgy. E«speclal attention is
given to the sciences of mathematics, physics, chemistry,
mineralogy, geology, and their applications. The two years'
course In Assaying Is designed to prepare students as Assayers
only. The Bureau of Mines and Assaying, while not directly
connected with the work of instruction, affords, with its lab-
oratory and the influx of new material, a valuable object lesson
to the advanced students of mining and metallurgy.

REGISTERING

All students are required to register on registration day at
the beginning of the year in the president's office. A matricu-
lation fee of $5.00 Is required of all students upon entering the
University. No student will be registered until the matricula-
tion fee has been paid. After this fee is once paid no further
fee is required for registration. After registration no change
in classes can be made without the consent of the committee
on registration.

RECORDS
The class standing of each student Is determined by the in-
structor in charge. The method of ascertaining the student's

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GBNERAI. INFORllATIGN li

record is left to the Instructor, and hto report In all casta is
flnaL

Reports of standing in classes are sent each month from the
president's omce to parents or guardians. Those to whom these
reports are addressed are urgently requested to examine each
with care and to «pur up delinquent students or commend those
who are diligent, as the case may be. Without such hearty
co-operation good results cannot be expected.

DISCIPLINE

It is* earnestly desired that students may be Influenced to
good conduct by higher motives than fear of punishment. The
sense of duty and honor, the courtesy characteristic of ladies
and gentlemen are appealed to as the best regulators of oon*
duct. It Is the policy of the University to allow as much liberty
as will not be abused; but good order will be strictly main-
tained, and misconduct punished by adequate penalties. Fre-
qnentlng saloons or billiard rooms, or any conduct harmful to
the normal standing of the school will render the student liable
to punishment, and in aggravated cases to expulsion. Any
attempt on the part of a student to present as his own the work
of another, or to pass any test or examination by unfair means
is considered a most serious offense. In case of expulsion a
student is required by law to surrender to the University his
cadet uniform.

Students or classes desiring to make requests of the faculty
should file their petition in the president's office before the hour
of faculty meeting; class petitions must be presented at least
two days before the time of meeting.

VACATIONS AND HOLIDAYS
A short recess (see calendar, page 2) is taken at Christmas
time. The long summer vacation begins about June first and
continues until the middle of September. The Thanksgiving
recess extends firom the close of the regular exercises on the
Wednesday before Thanksgiving to the next Monday morning.
AU legal holidays are observed by the cessation of ordinary
University work.

Appropriate exercises, In which the students will be ex*
pected to join if required, may be arranged by the Otculty tor
any legal h<rtlday.



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20 UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Arbor day has been formally adopted by the University
regents as the regular anniversary on which shall be celebrated
the founding of the Institution, in connection with the cere-
monies of tree planting.

LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS

Provision is made as far as possible for furnishing board
and rooms to students of both sexes upon the University
grounds.

Young men have excellent quarters in South Hall, a new
dormitory building.

North Hall, the home of the young ladies, is in charge of an
experienced and capable preceptress who has constant super-
vision of those rooming there.

Both dormitories are lighted by electricity. Rooms contain
a clothes-press, and are provided with single bedsteads, table,
chairs, mirror, wash-bowl, pitcher and slop-jar. Students will
supply their own brooms, mattresses, pillows, sheets, blankets,
towels, naplElns, rugs and such other articles as they may
desire for ornamenting their rooms. They will care for their
own rooms under the direction of the instructor in charge.

TEES AND EXPENSES

LOWEST HIGBSST

Tuition, free

Matriculation (paid but once) | 5.00 | 6.00

Laboratory and shop fees, varying according to

courses, per annum 1.00 30.00

Books, per annum 6.00 20.00

Board, per month 16.00 20.00

Liights per room, per month 50 1.60

By resolution of the Board of Regents of the University,
board is to be paid in advance on the first day of each month.
Checks, postofflce or express money orders should be made
payable to the president. No reduction will be made for ab-
sence for a period of less than one week.

Students leaving the University before the end of the se-
mester will receive no rebate from fees.

Text-books required are obtained directly from the pub-
lishers through a book association managed on the co-operative
plan under the direction of the faculty.

Members of the battalion wUl be required to provide tbem-



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QENESIAL INFORMATION H

selves with the prescribed uniform, which may be obtained at
the University. The cost of uniform, which must be deposited
In advance, during: the present year has been $16.25. This uni-
form has shown better wearing qualities than a civilian suit of
equal cost, and parents are urged to consider the matter of
uniform when supplying their sons with clothing for the ap-
proaching school year. It may be worn on all occasions, and
thus will remove the necessity for additional expenditure for
outer clothing other than overcoats.

Provision has been made to a limited extent for the self-
supjMirt of students.

RAILROAD RATES

The Southern Pacific, the Maricopa, Phoenix ft Salt River
Valley, the Santa Fe, Prescott A Phoenix, and the Olla Valley,
Globe A Northern railways have all generously allowed stu-
dents In attendance upon the University half rates when
journeying to and from their homes. This applies only to those
parts of these railroads In Arizona. In the case of students
coming to the University, these half rates may be secured by
notlfsrlng the president of the University at least two weeks In
advance, to enable him to secure the permits from the proper
a-uthorltles. Tickets may then be obtained by the student on
application to his own local railroad ticket agent. Students
a.t the University may secure transportation to their homes and
return at vacation time by making application at the office of
the president of the University. In case of any misunderstand-
ing with the ticket agent, the student should pay full fare, take
the- agent's receipt and report the matter to the University
authorities.



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REQUIREMENTS POR ADMISSION

Applicants for admission to any department of the Univer-
sity will be required to furnish satisfactory evidence of good
moral character, and of honorable dismissal from the schools
with which they were last connected.

Beginning with September, 1904, for admission to the Fresh-
man class, applicants must be at least sixteen years of age and
must pass satisfactory examinations In subjects sufficient to
give fifteen credits as described below. Until 1904 twelve credits
win be accepted. One study pursued satisfactorily for one
year, one period a day, as ordinarily taught in high schools,
entitles a student to one credit.

For admission to the course leading to the degree of Bache-
lor of Philosophy the subjects upon which examinations must
be passed, and the credits assigned each, are:

English 8 Lratin 8

Mathematics 8 Greek, French, German or

History and Civics 1 Spanish 2

Elective 2 Science 1

For admission to the course leading to the degree of Bache-
lor of Science, including the degrees of Bachelor of Science in
Mining, Engineering, Chemistry or Agriculture, the subjects
upon which examinations must be passed, and the credits
assigned each, are:

English 3 French, German or Spanish 2

Mathematics 3 Science 3

General History and Civics. 1 Elective 3

The scope of work required In these various subjects Is as
follows:

ENGLISH — (a) ETnglish classics. An acquaintance with the
works named below. These works are divided Into two classes,
those Intended for thorough study and those intended for gen-
eral reading. The portion of the examination devoted to the
former class will be upon subject matter, form and structure.
In addition, the candidate may be required to answer questions
involving the essentials of English grammar, and the leading
facta In those periods of English literary history to which the
prescribed books belong. In the portion of the examination de-



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REQUmSSMBNTS FOR ADMISSION U

voted to tbe latter clajBS, the candidate will be required to
preaent evidence of a general knowledge of the subject matter,
and to anawer almple questions on the lives of the authors.
Tkyd form of examination will usually be the writing of a para-
gTB^ or two on each of several topics, to be chosen by the
candidajte from a considerable number— perhaps ten or fifteen—
set before him in the examination paper. The treatment of
these topics is designed to test the candidate's power of clear
and accurate expression, and will call for only a general
knowledge of the substance of the books. In preparation for
this x>art of the requirement, it is important that the candidate
shall have been instructed in the principles of writing BhigUsh.
A knowledge of grammar is presupposed, (b) English composi-
tion. This requirement can be met only by examination of the
candidate or by his presenting satisfactory composition books
on themes certified by a former teacher as original uncorrected
work. The examination will take the form of a theme of five
hundred words on some subject familiar to the candidate and
will be a practical test of his ability to express himself in
writing qlearly find consecutively. No candidate will be ac-
cepted whose work is notably defective in point of neatness,
spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division into paragraphs. Those
f|ound lacking in composition will be required to make good
the deficiency at once in a special class organized for that
purpose.

No student will be admitted without examination, except
on the statement from his former instructors that the entire
requirement has been fulfilled. Substantial equivalents, prop-
erly certified, will be accepted.

For thorough study: For 1JM2, 1908, 1904, 1905, Shakespeare's
Maebetli; Wlton's L' Allegro, n Penserose, Comus, Lycidas;
jQurke's Speech oP Conciliation with America; Macaulay's
Sssays qn jtfllton and Addison.

,For genec^ reading: For 1903, 1904, 1905, Shakespeare's
Merchant of Venice and Julius Csesar; the Sir Roger de Cover-
ley, Papers In "The Spectator;" Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield;
Coferi^e's JUme of the Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Car-
lyle^s Bflsay on Burns; Tennyson's The Princess; Lo well's
Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Marner.

MATHSSMATICS— Arithmetic as covered in White's Ad-
Yanced Arithmetic to the appendix, but these subjects wiU ^



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24 tTNIVBRSITT OF ARIZONA

omitted in the entrance examinations; longritude and time, pres-
ent worth, stock investments, exchange, equation of payments,
compound proportion, partnership and cube root. Algebra,
through quadratic equations, as given in Wells's Essentials of
Algebra, or Wentworth's New School Algebra. Plane geometry
aB treated in the latest editions of Wentworth or Wells.

HISTORY AND CIVICS-^American History, including the
study of the subject topically. Smith's Topical Manual is used
in the sub-collegia te department. As much as is included in
Adams's European History and Fisk's Civil (Sovemment in the
United States or text books covering equivalent ground. In
place of General History the following will be accepted: His-
tory of Greece and Rome as contained in Myer's histories of
Greece and Rome or an equivalent and Coman and Kendall's
or Lamed's History of England.

^GREEK— As covered by Gleason and Atherton's Beginners'
Greek Book, Xenophon's Anabasis, four books, Homer's Iliad,
three books, with composition and the use of Hadley and
Allen's or Gk>odwin's Greek Grammar.

•LATIN— As covered by Collar's First Latin Book and Vlrl
Romae, together with Allen and Greenough's Grammar and
texts; sight reading; Cssar, four books or an equivalent;
Cicero, four orations; Vergil, six books; sight reading from
Nepos, Cicero and Gtollius; Daniell's or Bennett's Prose Compo-
sition.

•FRENCH— As covered by Whitney's French Grammar,
parts I and II; composition; Super's French Reader; Hal6vy,
L'Abb6 Constantin; MSrtm^e, Colomba; Moliftre, Le M6decin
malgr^ lul and Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme, and at least 800
pages from five different authors.

•SPANISH— De Tornos, Combined Spanish Grammar; Wor-
man's First and Second Spanish Readers, Loiseaux, Elementary
Spanish Reader; Valdis, Jose; Maratin, El si de los Nifios;
Alarc6n, El CapltAn Veno; Galdds, Dofia Perfecta; Cervantes,
Don Quixote.

•GERMAN— As covered by Kellner's German Grammar;
composition; Guerber's Maerchen und Erzaehlungen, together
with Rlehl, Der Fluch der SchOnhelt; Schiller, Marie Stuart and



•If any Ungnmge la offered it must be to the extent of two credits, dnoe a
■lagte year*s stndr of a language la not considered of snfBdent edncatioiiAl
valne to be enUtlcd to credit.



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RBQUnUBMSNTB FOR ADMISSION U

Jungtrau von Orleans; Goethe, Hermann und Dorothea, Iphl-
senia; Leesin^, Minna von Bamhehn.

SCISNCE— Under this head may be offered the required
number of credits in the following subjects: physical geog-
raphy, physiology, botany, chemistry, phirsics. elementary
astronomy. At least half the preparation in science should
consist of laboratory work. Note-book, covering such labora-
tory work as has been performed by the student, should be
presented for examination.

ELtBCTIVS— The remaining credits required may be made
up from additional subjects ordinarily taught in high schools^

Students from other institutions of equivalent rank may be
admitted to the higher classes upon the presentation of properly
authenticated certificates showing to the satisfaction of the
faculty that they are qualified to proceed with the desired work.

Arrangements have been made with the Arizona Normal
School at Tempe, and the Northern Normal School at Flagstaff,
whereby students from these institutions may have their record
transferred to the books of the University with proper credit,
upon presentation of a certificate duly signed by the principal.
Students of this University may also obtain the equivalent
privilege at the Normal Schools by presenting the proper cer-
tificate of standing, signed by the president.

The faculty desires to establish such relations with high
schools and other educational institutions as will enable it to
accept their certificates without question. To this end presid-
ing officers are respectfully requested to correspond with the
president.



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COURSES or STUDY AND DEGREES

All facilities and privileges of the University are open to
qualified persons of both sexes.

The University offers four-yey's French Grammar, Part I; Super's
French Reader; Hal^vy, L'Abb^, Constantln; M6rlm6e, Col-
omba Moll^re, Le M^decin Malgr6 Luland Le Bourgeois
Gentilhomme. Open to all students. Five hours both semes-
ters. (8)

FRENCH 8, 4— Whitney's French Grammar, Part II; Ra-
cine, Athalie; ComelUe, Le Cid; Balsac, Eugene Grandet;
Daudet, Morceauz Choisis; Hugo, Les Mlserables (abridged);
Rostand, Cyrano de Bergerac Open to students who have
taken French 1, 2. Four hours both semesters. (8)



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EXPLANATION OP COURSES OP INSTRUCTION SS

HISTORY. POLITICAL SCIENCE AND
PHILOSOPHY

PRESIDENT ADAMS
INSTRUCTOR BUTTERPIBLiD
In tbe work in history emphaBis is placed on the social and
political development, the relation of cause and effect and the
unity of history. The laboratory method is used wherever
possible and .individual wcHrk insisted upon. In political science
the historical method is used, and the subject rather than any
one writer's presentation of it is treated. After a brief pre-
sentation of pure economics, the course deals with practical
questions. The course in philosophy is arranged with especial
attention to the needs of teachers. Upon its completion grad-
uates of the University will receive Territorial Teachers' certif-
icates.

HISTORY

HISTORY 1. 2. ENGLISH HISTORY— Oreen's Short His-
tory of the English People used as a basis; much assigned
reading. A thesis is required. Open to all students. Four
hours both semesters. (8) (Miss Butterfleld.)

HISTORY 8, 4. AMERICAN COLONIAL. HISTORY—A de-
tailed study of the American colonies under Great Britain, and
of the United Statra to the adoption of the Constitution. Lec-
tures and assigned reading. A thesis is required. Open to
students who have taken History 1, 2. Two hours both se-
mesters, (i)

HISTORY 5, 6. ECONOMIC HISTORY OF THE UNITED
STATESS— A study of the causes and development of the eco-
nomic history of the United States. Lectures and assigned
reading. A thesis is required. Open to students who have
taken History 1, 2. Three hours both semesters. U)

HISTORY 7. 8. SPANISH AMERICAN HISTORY— Spanish
settlement and administration during the colonial period; the
growth and development of the Southwest, with special refer-
ence to Arizona. Lectures and assigned reading. Open to all
students. Two hours both semesters. (J^J

HISTORY 9, 10. OONSTIT13TIONAL HISTORY OF THE
UNITED STATES— A detailed study of the formation of the



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U UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Union and of the political and constitutional history of the
United States, based on letters and speeches of American
statesmen, public documents and special histories. A thesis is
required. Open to students who have taken History 8, 4. Three
hours both semesters. (^J

HISTORY U. 12. THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN POLIT-
ICALi PARTIES— A seminary course covering the origin, devel-
opment and principles of political parties from 1782 to the
present time. Johnston's American Politics and Stan wood's
History of the Presidency will be the basis of the course but
the work will require much reading and investigation and a
thesis. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Three hours both se-
mesters. (Will not be given in 1903-04.)

POLITICAL SCIENCE

ECONOMICS 1, 2.— A study of the general principles and
laws of political economy. Text-book, Walker's Advanced
Political Economy. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Two hours
both semesters. (4)

ECONOMICS Z, 4— A study of economic and sociologic prob-
lemSj such as the currency question, tariff reform, banldng,
taxation and similar subjects. Lecture and assigned reading.
A thesis is required. To be preceded or accompanied by Eco-
nomics 1, 2. Three hours both semesters. (J^J

PHILOSOPHY

PSYCHOLOGY 1— A special consideration of the subject as
applied to teaching. Lectures, recitations and collateral read-
ing. Open to Juniors and Seniors. Five hours first semester. (^J

PEDAGOGY 2— An account of educational evolution, both
as a culture fact in the history of civilization and as a founda-
tion for professional work; lectures, giving a brief but compre-
hensive outline of the school systems of ancient, mediaeval and
modem countries with a special study of leading educators,
such as Socrates, Commenlus, Pestalozzl, Froebel, Mann and
others; the present trend of pedagogical thought and practice,
methods of teaching, school management, art of questioning
and school law. Arrangements have been made with the Tucson
city schools to use the Holliday school as a practice school for
this class. Open to students who have taken Psychology 1.
Five hours second semester. (J^J



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EXPUINATION OP COURSES OF INSTRUCTION t5

LOGIC 1— Text-book, Jevons's Logic; reading from Mill,
Hamilton, Thomi»on and others. Open to Juniors and Seniors.
Four hours first semester. (V (Professor Woodward.)

LOGIC 2— A brief history of the development of scientific
thought and related philosophical ideas. (4J (Professor Wood-
ward.)

ETHICS 2— Theoretical and practical ethics; view of the



Online LibraryUniversity of ArizonaAnnouncement for the academic year → online text (page 2 of 53)