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Assay Laboratory, 24.

Assaying, 69.

Assaying, Bureau of Mines
and, 83.

Assaying, Rates for, 84.

Assistants, Student, 8.

Astronomy. 50.

Athletics, 30, 78.

Bennett Scholarship, 39.

Biolosry, 22, 51.

Board of Regents, 3.

Boarding, 37.

Bookkeeping. 102.

Botany, 22, 92.

Buildings. 14-16.

Bureau of Mines and Assay-
ing, 83.

Calendar, 2.

Campus, 13.

Carnegie Ldbrary, 20.

Chem&try, 23, 52-54.

Civics, 42.

Civil Engineering, 26, 54-57.

Climate, 13.

College of Agriculture and
Mechanic Arts, 32.

Committees of Faculty, 9.

Courses of Instruction. 50.

Courses of Study and Degrees,
45-49.

Courses of Study, Preparatory,
92-103.



Date Orchard, 89.

Degrees Conferred, 1906, US.

Degrees, Courses for, 45, 49.

Desert Botanical Laboratory.
51.

Discipline, 34.

Domestic Science, 60, 101 .

Drawing, 66.

Economics, 57.

Electives, 43.

English, 40, 57, 96.

Equipment, University, 17-31.

Ethics, 77.

Excursions, Mining, 74.

Expenses, 37.

Experiment Station, see Agri-
cultural Experiment Station

Faculty, 4-7.

Fees, 37.

French, 43, 61.

Geology, 61.

German, 43, 63.

Groups of Courses, 47.

Greek, 42.

Gymnasium, 30.

History, 42, 64, 101.

Horticulture, 29.

Information, General, 34-44.

Instruction, Courses of, 50.

Latin, 43, 64.

Library, 17-20.

Living Accommodations) 36.

Location of University, 13.

Loflrtc, 77.

Muntenance, 16.

Mathematics, 25, 42, 65, 99.

Mechanic Arts, 28, 66, 99.

Mechanical Engineering, 27, ((8

Metallurgy, 25, 69.

Military Equipment, 31.

Military Organization, 109-110

Military Science and Tactics,
71.

Mineralogy, 25, 72.



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Mining', 24.

Mining Engineering, 25, 7:^.

Museum, 21-22.

Music, 75.

Normal Schools, Credit from,

44.
Officers of the University, 3-9.
Organization, University, 11,32
Parliamentary Practice, 86.
Pedagogy, 77.
Petrography, 24, 78.
Philosophy, 76.
Physical Culture, 78.
Physics, 24, 79.
Preparatory Department, 92-

103.
Psychology, 77.
Range Station, 89.
Records, 34.

Regents, Board of, 3, 13.
Register of Students, 111-119.
Registration, 34.



Requirements of Admission,
39-44.

Rooms, 36.

Samples, Shipping of, 86.

School of Mines, 33.

Science, 43, 100.

Shop and Drawing— See Me-
chanic Arts.

Site, University, 13-14.

Sociology, 80.

Spanish, 45, 81.

Special Students, 45.

Stenographv, 103.

Summary of Registration, 117.

Surveying, 21, 55.

Thesis, 46.

"Timely Hints for Farmers,'*
29, 89.

Tuition, 34.

Typewriting, 103.

Uniform, 38, 72.

Vacations, 35.

Zo-ology, 52.



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' 71 H



UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA RECORD

VOLUME 1. No. 2. MAY. 1908.

OCT 22 1909

REGISTER

1907-8



ANNOUNCEMENTS



1908-9



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UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

TUCSON. ARIZONA

1908



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REGISTER



OF THE



University of Arizona



SEVENTEENTH YEAR
1907-1908



ANNOUNCEMENTS
I906-I909



TUOSON. ARIZONA

Citizen Printing and Publishing Co.
1908



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CAIiENDAIL

1908.



Sept. 17, Thursday .
SBpt. 18, Friday .
Sept. 21, Monday .
Sept. 22, Tuesday .
Nov. 25, Wednesday
Nov. 30, Monday .
Dec. 23, Wednesday



Entrance Examinations.
Condition Examination.
Registration Day.
First Semester begins.
Thanksgving recess begins.
Instruction resumed.
Holiday recess begins.



1909.



Jan. 4, Monday .
Jan. 29, Friday .
Feb. 1, Monday .
May 30, Sunday .
June 1, Monday .
June 2, Wednesday



][nstruction resumed.
First Semester ends.
Second Semester begins.
Baccalaureate Discourse.
Exhibition Military Depi.
Commencement



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BOARD OF RBGENTS.
Ex-Offlclo.

HON. JOSEPH H. KIBBBY PHoenU

Governor of the Territory.

HON. R. L. LONG Phoenix

Superintendent of Public Instruction.

Appointed by the Governor.

Term expires.
HON. MERRILL P. FREEMAN, Tucson August. 1909

Chancellor,
HON. QEORQE J. ROSKRUGE, Tucson August, 1909

Secretary.
HON. CHARLES H. BATLESS, A. M., Tucson . August, 1909

Treasurer.
HON. A. V. GROSSETTA, Tucson August, 1911

Regular meetings on the 10th of each month.



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PACUIiTY.

KENDRIC CHARLES BABCOCK, Ph. D.

B. L... 1889, Minnesota; A. M.. 1895, Harvard; Ph. D., 1896, Harvard.
PresidBnt; Professor of History and Economics. 1903.*

WILLIAM PHIPPS BLAKE, A. M.
Ph. B., 1862, Yale; A. M., Dartmouth; D. Sc, 1907, Pennsylvania
Professor of Geology, Emeritus. 1895.

ROBERT HUMPHREY FORBES, M. S.

B. a, 1892, M. S., 1895, University of IlUnois.
Director and Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Sta-
tion. 1894.

jFRANK NELSON GUILD, M. S.

B. S., 1894, M. a, 1903, Vermont.
Professor of Chemistry and Mineralogy. 1897.

GEORGE EDSON PHILIP SMITH, C. E.

B. S., 1897; C. E.. 1899. Vermont.
Irrigation Engineer, Agricultural Experiment Station.
1900.

JOHN JAMES THORNBER, A. M.

B. a, South Dakota (AgHcultural) ; B. 8., 1897. A. M.,1901, Nebraska.
Professor of Biology; Botanist, Agricultural Experi-
ment Station. 1901.

SAMUEL VICTOR McCLURE

First Lieutenant, U. S. A., 1896, West Point.
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 1904.

EDWIN MORTIMER BLAKE, Ph. D.

Engineer of Mines, 1890; Ph. D., 1893, Columbia.
Professor of Mathematics and Mechanical Engineer*
ing. 1904.

*Dates following titles indicate appointment to service in the Uni-
versity,
t Leave of absence, 1908-9.



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SIDNEY CARLETON NEWSOM, A. M.

A. B., 1896. Harvard; A. M., 1896, Chicago.
Professor of English. 1904.

CYRUS FISHER TOLMAN, Jr., B. 8.
B. S., 1896, Chicago.
Professor of Geology and Mining Engineering, 1906.

ALBERT EARLE VINSON. Ph. D.

B. 8., 1901, Ohio (State); Ph. D., 1906, Ooettingen.
Associate Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station.
1905.

CHARLES ALFRED TURRELL, A. M.

B. S., 1896, Nebraaka; A. M.. 1901, Missouri.
Professor of Modern Languages. 1904.

LESLIE ABRAM, WATBRBURY, C. E.

B. S., 1902; C. E., 1906, Illlnlos.
Professor of Civil Engineering.

ROBERT RHEA GOODRICH, M. S.

B. 8., (Mining), 1885; B. 8., (Mechanical Eng.), 1901; M. S., 1902. Mass
Inst. Technology.
Professor of Metallurgy. 1907.

ROBERT WAITMAN CLOTHIER, M. S.

B. 8., 1897; M. 8., 1899. Kansaa (Agricultural).
Professor of Agriculture and Conductor of Farmers
Institutes. 1907.

J. ELIOT COIT, Ph. D.

B. 8., North Carolina; M. 8„ 1906; Ph D., 1907» Cornell.
Associate Horticulturist, Agricultural Experiment
Station. 1907.

WILLIAM WHEELER HENLEY, A. B.

A. B., 1906, Leland Stanford, Jr.
Professor of Mechanic Arts. 1905.

ANDREW ELLICOTT DOUGLASS, A. B.
A. B.. 1889. Trinity.
Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 190S.



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WILLIAM BURNETT McCALLUM, Ph. D.

B. 8. A., UK Toronto; Ph. D., IM Chlcaca
Associate Botanist, Agiicvltural E^cperiment Station.
1907.

FREDERICK W. WILSON, B. S.

a fr, IMS. Kansas. (Aartcultural.)
Associate Animal Husbandman, A^icultural Experi-
ment SUtion. 1905.

WILLIAM QBORQE MBDGRAFT, A. M.

A. Bw, IBM; A. M. UOi Kanuui Wesleyan.
AssisUnt Professor of MathemaUcs. 1906.

VICTOR LIDQA, B. 8.

B. a. UOi CaUfornia.
Assistant Professor of Physical Training and French.
1906.

RAYMOND C. BENNER. M. S.

B. a, 1902. Minnesota; M. a. 1906. Wisconsin.
Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 1906.

MARION CUMMINQS STANLEY, B. L.
B. L.. 1900. CaUfornia.
Instructor in Philosophy. 1902.

ESTBLLE LUTRELL, A. B.

A. B.. 1896, Chlcaso.
Instructor in English; Libi^rian. 1904.

FREDERICK EDWIN TALMAGE, B. L.
B. L... 1908. California.
Instructor in Stenography and BoolE-lceeping. 1904.

LEVONA PAYNE NEWSOM, Ph. D.

A. B.. 1892: Ph. D.. 1886. FrankUn.
Instructor in Latin. 1905.

OPAL lONB TILLMAN, B. S.

B..8.. 1906; M. 8.. 1906. Ohio StaU.
Instructor in Domestic Science and Botany. 1906.



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IDA CHRISTINA REID. Ph. B.

Ph. B., 1906. Arisona.
Instructor in History and Mathematics. 1906.

CHARLES GUY HOOVER

Rochester College (Indiana.)
Instructor in Music.

MART JOHNSTON HOCHDBRFTER
B. A. 1908, Toronto.
Instructor in Modern Languages and English. 1907.

ESTHER EVERETT LAPE, B. A.

B. A., 1906, Wellesley.
Instructor in English. 1907.

FRANK CALEB KELTON, B. S.

R 8., ISOi Ariiona.
Instructor in Civil Engineering and Drawing. 1907.

FRANK OSCAR SMITH, LL. B.

B. 8.. 1906; M. A., LL. B., 1907, Northwestern.
Instructor in History and Economics. 1907.

WILLIAM HORACE ROSH, Ph. D.

B. S., 1903; M. 8., 1904, Dalhousie; Ph. D.. 1907. Chicago.
Assistant Chemist, Agricultural Experiment Station
. 1907.



FREDERICK EDWIN TTALMAGE, B. L.
Secretary of the Uniyersity. 1904.

HERBERT BROWN

Curator Territorial Museum.

LURENA MERRIMAN

Preceptress of Toung Women. 1907.

MRS. MARY HENRY AITON. M. D.
M. D. Northwestern.
Medical Examiner for Women. 1906.



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ARTHUR W. OLCOTT, M. D.

A. B., 1884, Princeton; M. D., 1887, St. LouiB.
Medical Examiner for Men. 1905.

RAYMOND C. BENNBR, M. S.

Head of Men's Dormitory. 1907.

WILBUR OLIVER HAYES

Secretary of the Agricultural Experiment Station. 1907.

WALTER M. COLE

Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds. 1907.

RAYMOND C. BBNNER, M. S.
Commercial Assayer. 1907.



STUDENT ASSISTANTS.

(Service not continuous through the year in every case.)



H. M. Wolflin
M. M. Carpenter
E. B. Whiting
W. A. Tarr
Burrell R. Hatcher
Theodore Chapin
Frances M. Babcock-
Mabel Wilkerson
B. S. Dinsmore

A. Perry Thompson

B. F. De Corse

B. L. Cheney
E. O. Blades

C. G. Standeford



R. Haby
E. Burgess

E. Engle
S. R. Jones

Lawrence A. Calloway
Pauline Rodgers
Anita C. Post

H. Oliver Coles
Frank Cannon
G. T. Ratliffe

F. W. Rose
W. P. Steele

G. S. Foster, Jr.



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STANDING GOMBHTTEES.

1907 1908.

The President Is ex-officio member of all committees.

Executive.

Professors Forbes, Tolman, B. M. Blake.

Reglstratloii and ClaMiflcation.

Professors Quild, E. M. Blake, Newsom, Medcraft.

lilbniry.

Professor Qulld, Turrell, Miss Lutrell.

AthleUcs.

Professors Thornber, Douglass, Mr Lldga.

PnUlc Exercises.

Professor Medcraft, Miss Lutrell

IntercoUegiate Debafde.

Professors Thornber, Newsom.

Manual Training.

Professors Henley, E. M.. Blake, Miss Tillman.

Co-operative Association.

Mr. Tallmage.

Preparatory Department.

Professors Newsom, Medcraft, Miss Reid.

Rliodes Scholarship.

President Babcock, Professors Newsom, Guild.



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UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA



Eirtttblished hj Act of the LegisUtiTe Awemblj, 1885;
Open to Students, October, 1891.



PURPOSfi AND ORGANIZATION.

The University of Arizona is an integral part of the
system of public education established by and for the
Territory, and aims, as the head of such system, to fill
the same position as that occupied by the State uni-
versities in such States as California and Wisconsin.
Its general organization is in accordance with the Act
of Congress of July 2, 1862 known as the Morrill Act,
creating the "Land Grant Colleges ;" the details of its
organization and government are regulated by the Act
of the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Ari-
zona, passed in 1885 and embodied, with amendments,
in the Revised Statutes of Arizona Territory, 1901,
which vests the government of the institution in a cor-
poration styled the Board of Regents of the University
of Arizona, consisting of the Governor and Superin-
tendent of Public Instruction of the Territory, ex
officio, and four other members appointed by the Gov-
ernor for a term of four years.

In creating the University, the Legislative Assembly
wisely followed the example of the great States of Wi«-



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12 ^^avBKSIT)r of Arizona.

consin, Illinois, Minnesota, Nebraska, and California,
in unifying under one management the various schools
and institutions of higher learning or investigation in
Arizona, — ^the colleges of liberal arts, the sdiools of
mines and engineering, the agricultural college, and the
agricultural experiment station, which in some States
have been widely and completely separated. No profes
sional schools of law, medicine, dentistry, or music have
been established. In compliance with the provisions
of Act creating it, the University consists of

I. The College of Agriculture and Mechanical
Arts.

II. The School of Mines.

III. The Agricultural Experiment Station.

IV, The Preparatory Department.

The Normal Department authorized by the statute
has not as yet been organized. The Preparatory Depart-
ment, which is really a first class manual training high
school with a four years course, will gradually disap-
pear as the educational system of the Territory is de-
veloped by the establishment of efficient high schools,
but no date is set for abolishing even the first year of
this preparatory course.

The University in all departments is open to persons
of both sexes, who are qualified for admission.
Through the aid received from the United States and
from the Territory, it is enabled to offer its privileges to
residents and non-resident^, with only very moder-
ate changfcs.



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PURPOSE AND ORGANIZATION. 13

The purpose of the University of Arizona is, in the
language of the organic law, "to provide the inhabi-
tants of this Territory with the means of acquiring a
thorough knowledge of the various branches of litera-
ture, science and the arts;" and so far as possible a
technical education adapted to the development of the
peculiar resources of Arizona. In furtherance of this
latter purpose, instruction is provided especially in
subjects fundamental to agriculture, the mechanic arts,
mining, and metallurgy. The University, by the
nature of its situation, frankly lays its strongest em-
phasis upon the course in mining engineering. It is,
in reality, in a great mining laboratory, surrounded
as it is on all sides by great mines. Some of these
mines developed on a large scale are within a few
miles of the city and the number and magnitude of such
enterprises are steadily increasing. Probably no Uni-
versity in the United States offers such fine advantages
to the students of mining engineering who desire to
see the actual operation of great mines, or the develop-
ment of great enterprises, while carrying on the theo-
retical and experimental work of the mining course.
The advantages in civil engineering are hardly less
noteworthy, for Tucson is not only a division point on
the main line of the Southern Pacific railioad, with
large shops and roundhouses, but it has the adminis-
trative and engineering headquarters for five of the
subsidiary or allied lines of the Southern Pacific system
in Arizona and in Sonora, Mexico, commonly Imown



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14 UNIVERSITY OP ARIZONA.

as the Randolph lines. All these lines arc undergo-
ing extensive expansion and rebuilding, and so furnish
excellent opportunities for observation and vacation
employment for students of civil engineering.

LOCATION AND CUMATE.

The University of Arizona is located at Tucson, a
city of fifteen thousand inhabitants, on the main line
of the Southern Pacific railway, 312 miles west of El
Paso, Texas, and 500 miles east of Los Angeles, Cal.
The city lies in a broad, flat valley at an elevation of
2,400 feet above sea level and is surrounded by moun-
tains. Its dry, mild, and equable climate has made
Tucson a famous winter resort unsurpassed for
healthfulness.

The winter climate is especially good; the tempera-
ture is cool and strengthening but not severe^ the low-
est temperature recorded during the average year be-
ing about twenty degrees above zero, Fahrenheit. Lit-
tle rain falls during the winter; fogs are all but un-
known; cloudy days are rare. The percentage of
sunshine throughout the winter is greater than that
recorded at any other place in the United States.
Owing to the extreme dryness of the air the highest
temperatures known are less oppressive to the senses
and less dangerous to the health than the summer
heats of the upper Mississippi Valley States. The
total amount of rainfall averages less than twelve
inches.

These advantages insure to students a comfortable



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BUILDINGS. 16

education and a wide range of out-door sports and
recreations throughout the college year.

The University Campus, consisting of fifty-five
acres, is situated upon high ground about a mile fiom
the business center of the city with which it is con-
side by an excellent electric street-car line. On every
side it commands a view of mountain scenery of re-
markable extent and grandeur. The buildings are
lighted by electricity furnished by the city plant.

An abundant supply of unusually good water for
household, laboratory and irrigation purposes is
drawn from a large well on the Campus from a depth
of one hundred and twenty feet.

The grounds have been carefully laid out in drives,
lawns and gardens. A large number of palm, olive,
umbrella, ash, pepper, bagota and cottonwood trees
give the Campus the air of a well kept park.

BUHiDINOS.

The main building. University Hall, is 200x150
feet, two stories in height; the first story of gray stone,
the second of red brick. It is completely surrounded
by a wide two-story veranda. The building contains
recitation rooms, laboratories and apparatus rooms of
various departments, an assembly room, and the office,
laboratories and library of the Agricultural Experi-
ment Station.

The library and museum building, costing about
$32,000, including furnishings, was occupied in Jan-
uary, 1905. It is a handsome building of red brick



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16 UNIVBRSITY OP ARIZONA.

and Bedford sandstone, with a massive tile roof. The
interior finish is in natural oak and pine. The offices
of the president and secretary of the University, tliree
lecture rooms for the departments of geology, mathe-
matics, English and history, work rooms for the
library and museum, and a laboratory for the depart-
ment of geology are on the first floor. The Library
reading room, on the second floor is a large, well*
lighted room, beautifully furnished with heavy solid
oak reading tables, desks and wall cases. The stack-
room at the rear is fitted up with the most modern
steel stacks. The Museum occupies part of the first
floor and the west half of the second floor. Fine oak
and plate glass cases constitute the furnishings.

North Hall, a dormitory two stories in height,
built of gray stone of fine quality, is occupied by the
college men. Besides the parlor, and rooms of the
instructors in charge, it contains seventeen rooms,
each large enough to accommodate two students, be-
sides bath and toilet rooms.

South Hall, a large brick building containing forty
rooms, besides bath and toilet rooms and store rooms,
is the dormitory mainly for preparatory students. It
is heated by a hot-water sj^stem. It will accomnuxlate
seventy-five students.

West College and its new four-room annex are the
dormitories for yoimg women, — a two story brick
house with wide porches, surrounded with vines,
shrubbery, lawns and trees.



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BUILDINGS. 17

The Dining Hall, built of red brick, provides ample
boarding accommodations for all persons living on
the campus.

The Shop and Assay building is a large, substantial
brick structure. It contains a commodious drawing
room for mechanical and free-hand drawing, a large
laboratory for forge work, machine practice and car-
pentry and a laboratory, instrument room and lecture
room for the department of civil engineering. Two
other rooms are used for lockers, and for the motor
and engine. The assay laboratory and commercial as-
saying department occupy five rooms fully equipped
with a large melting furnace, the necessary muffle
furnaces, and other accessories for making complete
and accurate assays.

The Mill or Mining Machinery building, located to
the northeast t>f the main group of buildings, is a plain
wooden structure in which are placed the stamp-mills,
jigs, concentrating tables, separators, etc., necessary
for the mming laboratory.

Herring Hall the gymnasium, is a very substantial
high building, 40x80 feet, constructed of red brick
and white plaster. It was erected in 1903, the gift of
Professor James Douglas and his associates of the
Copper Queen Consolidated Mining Company,
through Colonel William Herring, after whom it was
named.

The ptmip house and medianical engineering
laboratory wa^ built in 1905. By the use of brick,



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18 UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA.

cement and iron it is practically fire proof, thus insur-
ing safety to the well and pumps supplying the Uni-
versity with water for all its uses.

Two two-story brick residences arc occupied by the
President of the University and by the Director of the
Agricultural Experiment Station.

Other buildings are the cottage occupied by the de-
partment of domestic science, three green houses, a
brick barn, and various smaller out-buildings used for
shops and store rooms.

MAINTBNANCE.

The University is maintained by funds appropri-
ated by the United States and by the Territory of
Arizona. Fifty-«even sections of very valuable pine
land in Coconino County have been set apart by the
Federal Government for the benefit of the University,
but title and control of the land does not pass to the
Board of Regents until the Territory is admitted as a
State. In the meantime, only a very small sum is an-
nually received from the leases of this land.

By the provisions of the Morrill Act of 1890, the
University receives annually from the United States
the sum of $25,000 "to be applied only to instruction
in agriculture, the mechanic arts, the English
language and the various branches of mathematical,
physical, natural and economic science, with special
reference to their applications in the industries of life,
and to the facilities for such instruction." This Mor-
rill Fund is to be ultimately duplicated by the "Nd-



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HAINTBNANCBS. 19

son Fund," created by the Act of March 4, 1907,
which appropriated $5,000 for the year beginning
July I, 1907 and provided for an annual increase of
$S,ooo, until the total received by each State should
be $50,000 per year from the two funds. The Uni-
versity receives from the same source, for the support
of the Agricultural Experiment Station, $15,000
yearly from the Hatch Act of 1887; the Adams Act
of 1906, for the current year, appropriates $9000
which is to be increased annually by $2000 until it
also produces $15,000, giving the Station ultimately
$30,000 per year.

The appropriations by the Territorial Legislative
Atssembly of 1907 were $33,000 per year, for two
year, for maintenance, $5,600 for the work of the
Agricultural Experiment Station, and $40,000 for
improvements ($20,000 to be available January i,
1908, and $20,000 on January i, 1909). This last
sum will be used in the construction of a science
building for the departments of chemistry, physics,
and biology, plans for which have already been ac-
cepted by the Board of Regents. The building should
be ready for occupancy by the spring of 1909.

The University also receives annually, from miscel-
laneous sources such as matriculation and tuition fees,
rent of cottages, damage to University property, etc.,
about $1400. The receipts for board, lights, etc.,
amount to about $16,000 per year.. "^ t »»..



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to UNIVER8ITY OF ARIZONA

EQUIPBiENT.

LIBRARY.

The library contains 13,000 bound volumes and
12,000 pamphlets, and is open for the use of all stud-
ents. Of these volumes a collection of complete sets
of scientific and literary periodicals, to which addi-
tions are being made yearly, is of special service in
reference work. The library was made a regular de-
pository of United States Government documents in
1907.

The books are classed by the decimal system and
shelved in numeric order with a further author di-
vision according to the Cutter numbers. The cata-
logue is the usual dictionary card catalogue of au-
thors, subjects and titles in one alphabetical arrange-
ment. Library of Congress cards are used whenever
obtainable. The Reading Room is supplied with



Online LibraryUniversity of ArizonaAnnouncement for the academic year → online text (page 31 of 53)